Digital Classicist London 2019, call for proposals

February 11th, 2019 by Gabriel Bodard

The Digital Classicist invites proposals for the summer 2019 seminar series, which will run on Friday afternoons in June and July at the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London.

We would like to see papers that address digital, innovative and collaborative research, teaching and practice in all areas of antiquity (including cultures beyond the Mediterranean), whether from classics, ancient history, cultural heritage, reception, or other perspectives. Proposals from researchers of all levels, including students and professional practitioners, are welcome. As with previous years, most presentations will be live-cast and archived on Youtube.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend). To submit a paper, please email an abstract of up to 300 words as an attachment to gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk by Monday, March 4, 2019.

Digital Editions in Practice (Tufts, May 31–June 1, 2019)

February 1st, 2019 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Lisa M. Cerrato:

Call for applications: Digital Editions in Practice, A Two-Day Workshop

Hosted by: Perseus Digital Library
Where: Tufts University, Medford, MA
When: May 31 – June 1, 2019
Application Deadline: March 1, 2019
Contact: perseus_neh@tufts.edu
How to apply: complete online form (including statement of intent)

The Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University will host a two-day workshop that provides an overview of a sample, practical digital editions creation workflow. This will feature both an open-lecture component led by developers and expert users of advanced technologies and “hands-on” sessions for participants that offer in-depth demonstrations of select tools and technologies as well as discussions tailored to the attendees.

See the full announcement for more details.

British Library PhD Research Placements (London, 2019)

January 25th, 2019 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded from Gethin Rees:

The British Library are advertising placements for PhD students, several of which might be of interest.

https://www.bl.uk/news/2019/january/phd-research-placements-2019

May I draw your attention to the placement titled ‘Identifying and using map images in born-digital collections’.

https://www.bl.uk/britishlibrary/~/media/research%20collaboration%20webspace/placements%202019/digital%20map%20images.pdf

The deadline for applications is 18 February 2019.

This is a great opportunity for a student with an interest in geography, maps and digital research to develop their skills and experience through working with the British Library’s diverse digital collections.

Editor’s note: there are also several other placements in this call for applications that may be of interest to digital classicts, including:

And potentially many others…

 

EpiDoc and digital epigraphy workshop (London, April 29-May 4, 2019)

January 15th, 2019 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications for a six-day training workshop in digital and practical epigraphy at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, 29 April – 4 May 2019.

The workshop will be organised by Gabriel Bodard (ICS) and Katherine McDonald (Exeter), with additional training provided by Charlotte Tupman (Exeter), Charles Crowther (Oxford), Valeria Vitale (ICS) and Caroline Barron (Birkbeck). There will be no charge for the workshop. There will be a limited number of bursaries available to assist students and other unfunded scholars with the costs of travel and accommodation, provided by the AHRC Early Career Leadership Fellowship ‘Connectivity and Competition’ (PI Katherine McDonald).

The focus of the workshop will be on skills for Greek and Latin epigraphy, including squeeze-making, photogrammetry, reflectance transformation imaging (RTI), and EpiDoc. EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice, recommendations and tools for the digital editing and publication of ancient texts based on TEI XML. No expert computing skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek/Latin or other ancient language, epigraphy, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals. Although the focus is on Greek and Latin epigraphy, we welcome applications from those in other adjacent fields.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email k.l.mcdonald@exeter.ac.uk by Friday 15 February 2019, including the following information:

  • a brief description of your reason for interest
  • your relevant background and experience
  • if you would like to request a bursary, an estimate how much you would need.

If you have any questions before applying, please don’t hesitate to contact Katherine (k.l.mcdonald@exeter.ac.uk) or Gabby (gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk)

“Ancient History in the Internet Age” (Manchester, Jan 30, 2019)

January 9th, 2019 by Gabriel Bodard

The Manchester and District Classical Association’s Fourth Annual Whitehead Lecture will be held in the Geoffrey Manton Building at Manchester Metropolitcan University, on Wednesday  30 January 2019, 17:30. The public lecture (open to schoolchildren and the public as well as academics at all levels) may be of interest to Digital Classicists…

Our speaker this year is Professor Helen King (The Open University), on the topic of:

‘Does the Evidence Really Say That? Doing Ancient History in the Internet Age’

Abstract

The internet has changed how we do history of any kind. Primary sources are readily available to anyone with an interest in finding them, and more secondary material is available every day. But how do we evaluate the reliability of the evidence we find, and – even more importantly – how can we ensure that those with a general interest in ancient history have access to good materials? I’ve recently finished writing a book on how the internet does the ancient world, with special reference to Hippocrates. As part of this, I’ve engaged with some entirely fictional claims about the ‘Father of Medicine’ which now circulate widely, including the claims that he was the first to describe hysteria, and that he was imprisoned for twenty years for challenging the establishment. I suggest that, in some ways, there’s nothing new here: people have always told the stories they like and have played fast and loose with the evidence. But, in other ways, things have changed: access to bad history is now more widespread than ever.

This event is free and everyone is welcome but please register.

Post-doc position in Latin and Computational Linguistics (Lausanne)

January 8th, 2019 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Francesca Dell’Oro:

The Faculty of Arts of the University of Lausanne invites applications for a Postdoctoral Researcher SNSF in Computational Linguistics or Corpus Linguistics with a focus on Latin in the Language and Information Sciences Department.

Expected start date in position : 1st March 2019 (or to be agreed)
Contract length : 4 years
Activity rate : 75%
Workplace : Lausanne-Dorigny

The successful candidate will work on the project « A world of possibilities. Modal pathways on the extra-long period of time: the diachrony of modality in the Latin language » founded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF n° PP00P1_176778).

The team will consist of the PI and of a PhD student in addition to the Post-doc.

The main tasks of the post-doc researcher will be:

– the development of suitable annotation schemes
– the creation and development of a database and of its interface
– the creation and maintenance of the website of the project
– the annotation of Latin texts
– the collaboration at various research activities connected with the project (publications and other ways of disseminating results)

Job specification and application information.

Digital Humanities Winter School, Palermo 2019

January 7th, 2019 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Paolo Monella:

Applications are invited for the “Digital Humanities Winter School Palermo 2019” (#DHWSPA19) that will take place at the University of Palermo, Italy, from March 4-7 2019.

The winter school is sponsored by the Associazione per l’Informatica Umanistica e la Cultura Digitale, and by the Departments Scienze Umanistiche and Culture e Società and the Dottorato di ricerca internazionale in Studi Culturali Europei | Europäische Kulturstudien of the University of Palermo.

During the first day, talks by Fabio Ciotti, Vito Matranga, Raul Mordenti, Tito Orlandi, Elena Pierazzo, Roberto Rosselli Del Turco will provide an initial introduction to the digital humanities and Simona Stoyanova will lead a 2-hours workshop on TEI/EpiDoc markup.

In the following days, three 7-hours workshops will provide a hands-on introduction to:
1. TEI XML markup per scholarly digital editions (Luciano Longo);
2. Python programming for text and TEI XML analysis (Paolo Monella);
3. querying and visualization of a TEI XML edition (Tiziana Mancinelli).

A detailed program, the syllabi of the workshops and further information are available on the winter school website http://dhwspa19.unipa.it.

Participation is free of charge and open to students working on their BA or MA thesis, PhD students and scholars. No previous specific digital skills are required. Please apply by filling in the form in https://dhwspa19.unipa.it/call/ and uploading a CV (including an optional publication lists) by January 15, 2019. Priority will be given to PhD students and to those with research projects including digital humanities methods. Acceptance will be communicated by January 20.

The language of the winter school will be Italian, with the exception of the TEI/EpiDoc workshop held by Simona Stoyanova, which will be in English.

[Italian version in https://dhwspa19.unipa.it/call/]

All best,

Luciano Longo
Paolo Monella
Tiziana Mancinelli

Extended deadline: Studia UBB Digitalia, Digital Classics edition

November 5th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Reposting to note extended deadline, and interest in Digital Classics, of the forthcoming issue of Studia Digitalia:

    

Studia UBB Digitalia (ISSN 2559-6721) is the official journal of the Transylvania Digital Humanities Center – DigiHUBB. It is a peer-reviewed, open access scholarly publication, indexed in CEEOL and dealing with subjects of general interest in the field of digital humanities.

Its following number (4/2018) will be dedicated to digital classics, ancient history & archaeology, with a special focus on projects and initiatives pertaining to these fields. The subjects can include, but are not limited to, digital approaches to geo-visualization, non-invasive archaeological prospections, markup, scholarly annotation, photogrammetry, databases, etc.

The call is open to all specialists of the field, but we strongly encourage submissions from early career researchers.

The deadline for submissions is January 15th and for the Authors Guidelines, please see the dedicated page on the journal’s website. The articles should be submitted to dr. Rada Varga (radavarga@gmail.com).

For additional questions on this number of Studia UBB Digitalia, please contact us at the same e-mail address.

Workshop: Digital Approaches in Greek Palaeography, London, Dec 14, 2018

September 28th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Call for Participation

Digital Approaches in Greek Palaeography
Institute of Classical Studies, University of London
Room 234, Senate House, Malet Street WC1E 7HU
10:00-17:00 Friday, December 14, 2018

We invite interested scholars and colleagues to participate in a one-day discussion workshop exploring digital approaches, methods and tools to the study of Ancient Greek palaeography, script and scribal hands.

Palaeography as traditionally conceived has as its main goals handwriting decipherment and dating, next to the analysis of script styles and scribal hand identification. In recent years, digital palaeo¬graphy has been established as a new (sub)discipline, focusing specifically on the application of computational methods to palaeographical studies (see e.g. Ciula 2005; Rehbein et al. 2009). This has opened up new possibilities of research, such as the application of quantitative methods to palaeo-graphy.

Pioneering work in digital paleography has been done on languages such as Latin and English (see e.g. Terras 2006; Stokes 2009). There have also been several applications to Ancient Greek: Rodney Ast’s PapPal (http://www.pappal.info/contact) provides an online repository of images of dated docu¬mentay papyri, and several tools have been developed to align text and image (see e.g. Anagnosis at kallimachos.de/kallimachos/index.php/Anagnosis:Main). Several new projects have been an¬nounced, focusing in particular on non-literary sources, by scholars such as Klaas Bentein (Ghent), Isabelle Marthot (Basel), and Rodney Ast (Heidelberg).

In this one-day workshop, we want to address some key questions, including:

  1. What new research possibilities does digital palaeography offer?
  2. Can we arrive at a descriptive standard for (digital) palaeographical analysis?
  3. What role should the analysis of scribal hands and script types play in future investigations?
  4. Should new digital tools be developed, or can existing tools be modified and adapted to each researcher’s purpose? How much of the analysis can be done automatically with these tools?
  5. At what stages in research can digital tools assist the scholar—data gathering, categorization, synthesis, analysis, visualization, publication, etc.?
  6. What possibilities are there for interdisciplinary collaboration?

The main goal of the workshop is to bring together scholars with an interest in digital palaeography, focusing in particular on Ancient Greek. The workshop will be discussion focused, but will also involve a few short position papers or provocations to raise questions and structure the conversation.

We invite scholars to submit their interest in participating in these discussions. Although the focus is on Ancient Greek, contributions dealing with related topics in other ancient languages are welcome. We would like to see a mix of classicists working on palaeography who are interested in applying digital approaches to their material, and digital humanities or informatics scholars with an interest in working with ancient writing and scripts.
Please send an email outlining your interests in this area, and any prior work if applicable, to gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk and klaas.bentein@ugent.be by October 31. Notification of acceptance will be given by November 15.

We have a small amount of funding available to support attendees travel. Please let us know if you would like to apply for this support, and how much you would need.

Ciula, A. 2005 Digital paleography: using the digital representation of medieval script to support paleographic analysis. Digital Medievalist 1 (https://journal. digitalmedievalist.­org/­articles/10.16995/dm.4/print/)
Reggiani, N. 2017. Digital papyrology I: Methods, tools and trends. Berlin & New York. (OA)
Rehbein, M. et al. 2009. Codicology & palaeography in the digital age. Norderstedt.
Terras, M. 2006. Image to interpretation: an intelligent system to aid historians in reading the Vindolanda texts. Oxford.
Stokes, P. 2009. Computer-Aided Palaeography, Present and Future. In: M. Rehbein et al. 2009. Codicology & palaeography in the digital age, 309-338. Norderstedt.

Curator, Digital Publications, British Library (London)

September 11th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Gethin Rees:

The British Library is seeking a Curator, Digital Publications to help develop its ability to collect, manage and make complex digital publications available. The role supports the library’s ‘Emerging Formats’ project and is focused on UK publications created for the mobile web, as interactive narratives or in database format.
This is an exciting role offering opportunities to engage with creators and new technologies and to shape emerging collections.

One year Digital Humanities/French literature post, Lille

September 4th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Professor Bougassas:

Appel à candidature
Contrat de recherche postdoctoral OU
Contrat Ingénieur de recherche ou d’études

Humanités numériques / Littérature française des XVe et début XVIe siècles / manuscrits et imprimés

Dans le cadre de la préparation d’une base de données relationnelle sur des textes de la fin du Moyen Âge et du début du XVIe siècle (manuscrits et imprimés), l’Université de Lille recrute un/une post-doctorant/e pour 12 mois.

La personne recrutée travaillera sous la responsabilité du professeur Catherine Gaullier- Bougassas. Elle aura pour missions :

-le recensement et l’analyse des besoins pour la conception de la base de données, qu’elle présentera dans un document écrit ;
-le dépouillement d’un corpus de textes du XVe et du début du XVIe siècles (textes disponibles sous forme d’éditions modernes ou à partir des manuscrits et des imprimés des XVe et XVIe siècles, numérisés ou non)
-la collecte de données et la rédaction de notices
-la conception de la base de données relationnelle qui inclura des notices sur les textes, leurs manuscrits et/ou imprimés et qui établira les critères de recherche selon lesquels les croiser.
-la rédaction du cahier des charges pour le projet, ainsi que de la documentation d’administration et d’utilisation.
-la documentation de la production, du traitement et des analyses des données de la base.
-l’interface avec l’équipe informatique qui réalisera la base.

Read the rest of this entry »

Jobs: Living With Machines, British Library

August 28th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Shared from the British Library digital scholarship blog:

We are seeking to appoint several new roles who will collaborate on an exciting new project developed by the British Library and The Alan Turing Institute, the national centre for data science and artificial intelligence. You’d be working with an inter-disciplinary group of investigators. The project is led by Ruth Ahnert (QMUL), and co-led by (in alphabetical order): Adam Farquhar (British Library), Emma Griffin (UEA), James Hetherington (Alan Turing Institute), Jon Lawrence (Exeter), Barbara McGillivray (Alan Turing Institute and Cambridge) and Mia Ridge (British Library).

Jobs currently advertised:

Further opportunities are currently being scoped and are likely to include:

  • Data and Content Manager (British Library)
  • Rights Assurance (British Library)
  • Digital Curator (British Library, contributing to the development and implementation of the digital scholarship and public outreach strands of the project)
  • Digital Systems Engineer (British Library, suitable for Research Software Engineers or other software developers)

Digital Classics issue of Studia UBB Digitalia

July 17th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Annamária Pázsint:

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the following number of the journal Studia UBB Digitalia, which will be dedicated to digital classics, ancient history and archaeology.

Please find below details regarding the publication:

Studia UBB Digitalia (ISSN 2559-6721) is the official journal of the Transylvania Digital Humanities Center – DigiHUBB (Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania). It is a peer-reviewed, open access scholarly publication, indexed in CEEOL and dealing with subjects of general interest in the field of digital humanities.

Its following number (4/2018) will be dedicated to digital classics, ancient history & archaeology, with a special focus on projects and initiatives pertaining to these fields. The subjects can include, but are not limited to, digital approaches to geo-visualization, non-invasive archaeological prospections, markup, scholarly annotation, photogrammetry, databases, etc.

The call in open to all scientists of the field, but we strongly encourage submissions from career researchers.

The deadline for submissions is November 1st 2018 and for the Authors Guidelines, please see the dedicated page on the journal’s website. For additional questions on this number of Studia UBB Digitalia, please contact dr. Rada Varga (radavarga@gmail.com).

Teaching art & archaeology with 3D technologies

July 6th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Round Table: ancient art and archaeology pedagogy and 3D printing
Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, room 246
16:00 Wednesday July 11, 2018

The Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Historical Research at SAS have recently set up a centre of expertise and research in 3D imaging and modelling, with a view to supporting research, teaching, experimentation and collaboration in the use of 3D technologies to study the material and artistic culture of past societies. This centre includes some basic 3D kit: software and high-performance desktops for scanning and modelling; two low- to mid-range 3D printers; virtual reality headsets and a “gaming” platform.

We invite teachers and lecturers of ancient art and archaeology to join us for an informal round table to discuss the potential of 3D technologies, especially 3D printing, to enhance the teaching of ancient art and archaeology. Options range from the creation of replicas for classroom handling or testing of variant reconstructions of fragmentary artefacts, to engaging students with the processes of designing and making, but we would like to hear your ideas and what might work for you.

ALL WELCOME — NO REGISTRATION NECESSARY

Digital Classicist London, summer 2018

May 3rd, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Classicist London 2018

Institute of Classical Studies

Fridays at 16:30 in room 234*, Senate House south block, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
(*except June 1 & 15, room G21A)

ALL WELCOME

Seminars will be screencast on the Digital Classicist London YouTube channel, for the benefit of those who are not able to make it in person.

Discuss the seminars on Twitter at #DigiClass.

*Jun 1 Zena Kamash (Royal Holloway) Embracing customization in post-conflict reconstruction (abstract)
Jun 8 Thibault Clérice (ENC) et al. CapiTainS: challenges for the generalization and adoption of open source software (abstract)
*Jun 15 Rune Rattenborg (Durham) Further and Further Into the Woods: Lessons from the Crossroads of Cuneiform Studies, Landscape Archaeology, and Spatial Humanities Research (abstract)
Jun 22 Joanna Ashe, Gabriel Bodard, Simona Stoyanova, Valeria Vitale (ICS), Jen Baird (Birkbeck) Annotating the Wood Notebooks workshop (abstract)
Jun 29 Monica Berti, Franziska Naether (Leipzig) & Eleni Bozia (Florida) The Digital Rosetta Stone Project (abstract)
Jul 6 Emma Bridges (ICS) and Claire Millington (KCL) The Women in Classics Wikipedia Group (abstract)
Jul 13 Kendra Hayes-Pang (KCL), Flor Herrero-Valdes (Granada), Elizabeth Lewis (UCL), Katherine Shields (UCL) Presentation and discussion of Sunoikisis Digital Classics student projects
Jul 20 Anshuman Pandey (Michigan) Tensions of Standardization and Variation in the Encoding of Ancient Scripts in Unicode (abstract)
Jul 27 Patrick J. Burns (NYU) Backoff Lemmatization for Ancient Greek with the Classical Language Toolkit (abstract)

This seminar series addresses the tension between standardisation and customisation in digital and other innovative and collaborative classics research. The topic encompasses all areas of classics, including ancient history, archaeology and reception (including cultures beyond the Mediterranean). Seminars will be pitched at a level suitable for postgraduate students or interested colleagues in Archaeology, Classics, Digital Humanities and related fields.

Digital Classicist London seminar is organized by Gabriel Bodard, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale (ICS) and Simon Mahony and Eleanor Robson (UCL).

For more information, and links to the live casts on YouTube, see http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2018.html

Seminar: Digital Restoration of Herculaneum Papyri (Oxford, Mar 15, 2018)

March 8th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

The University of Kentucky’s Digital Restoration Initiative & Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence present

Prof. W. Brent Seales:
Reading the Invisible Library: The Digital Restoration of Herculaneum Papyri

From the inner wraps of carbonized scrolls, to the fused and buckled pages of disintegrating books, the world’s vast invisible library can finally be made visible, thanks to technology. Join Professor Seales and his research team as they demonstrate the use of digital imaging tools to enhance the readability of Herculaneum fragment PHerc.118. The challenges, successes, and promises of digital restoration for revealing the elusive hidden texts of carbonized papyri—in a completely noninvasive, damage-free way—will be presented.

Thursday, March 15th, 3:00 PM
Merton Lecture Room, University College
10 Merton Street, Oxford
Drinks reception immediately following.

Doctoral studentship, Digital Grammar of Greek Documentary Papyri, Helsinki

February 21st, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

Posting for Marja Vierros. Full details and applications forms at University of Helsinki site.

Applications are invited for a doctoral student for a fixed term of up to 4 years, starting in the fall of 2018 to work in the University of Helsinki. The selected doctoral candidate will also need to apply for acceptance in the Doctoral Programme for Language Studies at the Faculty of Arts during the fall application period. The candidate’s main duties will consist of PhD studies and writing of a dissertation.

The doctoral candidate will study a topic of his/her choice within the historical development and linguistic variation of Greek in Egypt (e.g. certain morphosyntactic variation as a sign of bilingualism), by way of producing a selected, morphosyntactically annotated corpus of documentary papyri, according to Dependency Grammar. The candidate’s duties include participation in regular team meetings and presenting his/her research at seminars and academic conferences. The candidate is expected to also take part in designing the online portal that presents the results of the project.

The appointee to the position of doctoral student must hold a Master’s degree in a relevant field and must subsequently be accepted as a doctoral candidate in the Doctoral Programme mentioned above. Experience in linguistic annotation, corpus linguistic methods or programming are an asset, but not a requirement. The appointee must have the ability to conduct independent scientific research. The candidate should have excellent analytical and methodological skills, and be able to work both independently and collaboratively as part of a multidisciplinary scientific community. The successful candidates are expected to have excellent skills in written and oral English. Skills in Finnish or Swedish are not required. Relocation costs can be negotiated and the director will offer help and information for the practicalities, if needed.

CFP Digital Classicist London, summer 2018 seminar

February 16th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

The Digital Classicist invites proposals for the summer 2018 seminar series, which will run on Friday afternoons in June and July in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London.

We would like to see papers that address the tension between standardisation and customisation in digital and other innovative and collaborative classics research. The seminar encompasses all areas of classics, including ancient history, archaeology and reception (including cultures beyond the Mediterranean). Papers from researchers of all levels, including students and professional practitioners, are welcome.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend). To submit a paper, please email an abstract of up to 300 words as an attachment to valeria.vitale@sas.ac.uk by Monday, March 19th, 2018.

EpiDoc & EFES training workshop, London April 9–13, 2018

January 25th, 2018 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications for a five-day training workshop in text encoding for epigraphy and papyrology, and publication of ancient texts, at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 9–13, 2018.

The training will be offered by Gabriel Bodard (ICS), Martina Filosa (Köln), Simona Stoyanova (ICS) and Polina Yordanova (ICS/Sofia) and there will be no charge for the workshop. Thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, a limited number of bursaries are available to assist students and other unfunded scholars with the costs of travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice, recommendations and tools for the digital editing and publication of ancient texts based on TEI XML. EFES (github.com/EpiDoc/EFES) is a publication platform closely geared to EpiDoc projects and designed for use by non-technical editors. No expert computing skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek/Latin or other ancient language, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk, by Feb 28, 2018 including the following information:

  1. a brief description of your reason for interest
  2. your relevant background and experience
  3. If you would like to request a bursary, estimate how much you would need.

“Digital Editions, Digital Corpora, and new Possibilities for the Humanities in the Academy and Beyond” – NEH Institute – Tufts University, July 2018

January 19th, 2018 by Monica Berti

This is a second request for applications for a NEH Institute at Tufts University in July 2018. Deadline is February 1st.

The Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University invites applications to “Digital Editions, Digital Corpora, and new Possibilities for the Humanities in the Academy and Beyond” a two-week NEH Institute for Advanced Technology in the Digital Humanities (July 16-27, 2018). This institute will provide participants the opportunity to spend two intensive weeks learning about a range of advanced new methods for annotating textual sources including but not limited to Canonical Text Service Protocols, linguistic and other forms of textual annotation and named entity analysis. By the end of the institute, participants will have concrete experience applying all of these techniques not just to provided texts and corpora but to their own source material as well.

Faculty, graduate students, and library professionals are all encouraged to apply and international participants are welcome. Applications are due by February 1, 2018.

Full application information regarding the application process may be found here:
https://sites.tufts.edu/digitaleditions/applications/

For more information, please visit the institute website: https://sites.tufts.edu/digitaleditions or send an email to perseus_neh@tufts.edu

Survey on Digital Humanities collaborations

November 27th, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Max Kemman:

A distinguishing feature of DH is the collaboration between humanists and computational researchers. As part of my PhD research on digital history practices, I therefore am conducting an online survey to investigate the practices of collaboration. If you are part of a DH collaboration, I would like to kindly ask you to participate in this survey.

This survey is held to gain an overview of how collaborations in digital history and digital humanities are organised. Questions will focus on the organisation of people in the collaboration, the physical space, and the time frame of the collaboration. Filling out the survey should take about 10 minutes.

All data will be reported anonymously. The anonymous data will be made available open access later.

To participate in the survey, please follow www.maxkemman.nl/survey
To learn more about the study, please see www.maxkemman.nl/aboutsurvey

If you have any questions or comments, do not hesitate to contact me via max.kemman@uni.lu.

Max Kemman MSc
PhD Candidate
University of Luxembourg
Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH)

DCO 3,2 (2017) is out!

November 16th, 2017 by mromanello

A new special issue of the Digital Classics Online journal was published a few days ago, and it contains a selection of papers presented at the Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin during its first four years (2012-2015).

Table of Contents:

Editorial

M. Romanello, M. Trognitz, U. Lieberwirth, F. Mambrini, F. Schäfer. A Selection of Papers from the Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin (2012-2015), pp. 1-4. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.36870.

Articles

P. Hacıgüzeller. Collaborative Mapping in the Age of Ubiquitous Internet: An Archaeological Perspective, pp. 5-16. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35670.

A. Trachsel. Presenting Fragments as Quotations or Quotations as Fragments, pp. 17-27. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35671.

G. Bodard, H. Cayless, M. Depauw, L. Isaksen, K.F. Lawrence, S.P.Q. Rahtz†. Standards for Networking Ancient Person data: Digital approaches to problems in prosopographical space, pp. 28-43. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.37975.

R. Varga. Romans 1 by 1 v.1.1 New developments in the study of Roman population, pp. 44-59. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35822.

U. Henny, J. Blumtritt, M. Schaeben, P. Sahle. The life cycle of the Book of the Dead as a Digital Humanities resource, pp. 60-79. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35896.

K. E. Piquette. Illuminating the Herculaneum Papyri: Testing new imaging techniques on unrolled carbonised manuscript fragments, pp. 80-102. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.39417.

T. Roeder. Mapping the Words: Experimental visualizations of translation structures between Ancient Greek and Classical Arabic, pp. 103-123. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.35951.

F. Elwert, S. Gerhards, S. Sellmer. Gods, graves and graphs – social and semantic network analysis based on Ancient Egyptian and Indian corpora, pp. 124-137. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.36017.

R. Da Vela. Social Networks in Late Hellenistic Northern Etruria: From a multicultural society to a society of partial identities, pp. 138-159. DOI: 10.11588/dco.2017.0.39433.

 

 

 

 

Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2017/18

October 6th, 2017 by mromanello

We are delighted to announce that the programme for this year’s Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2017/18 is now available. You can find it online at http://de.digitalclassicist.org/berlin/seminar2017, at the bottom of this email or as a ready-to-print poster.

The seminar series will start on Oct. 16 with a talk by Rebecca Kahn (HIIG Berlin) “An Introduction to Peripleo 2 – Pelagios Commons’ Linked Data Exploration Engine”. This year’s keynote lecture will be given by Leif Scheuermann (ACDH, University Graz) on Oct. 30 and is entitled “Approaches towards a genuine digital hermeneutic”.

This year there will be a couple of organizational changes: seminars will take place on Mondays starting at 17:00 (instead of Tuesdays), and they will be held on a fortnightly basis either in Berlin-Mitte at the Humboldt University (Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, Institutsgebäude (HV 5), room 0319) or in Berlin-Dahlem at the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (Wiegandhaus, Podbielskiallee 69-71, entrance via Peter-Lenne-Str.).

We would also like to draw your attention to the possibility for students to attend the seminar as part of their curriculum, because the seminar is also offered by the Humboldt University as a “Ringvorlesung” (see the HU’s course catalog and the DH Course Regisrtry).

We would be very grateful if you could disseminate this email and the poster to others. We are looking forward to seeing you in the Seminar!

Programme

16.10.2017 (HU)
Rebecca Kahn et al. (HIIG)
“An Introduction to Peripleo 2 – Pelagios Commons’ Linked Data Exploration Engine”

30.10.2017 (DAI)
Leif Scheuermann (TOPOI)
“Approaches towards a genuine digital hermeneutic”

13.11.2017 (HU)
Gregory Gilles (KCL)
“Family or Faction? Using Cicero’s Letters to Map the Political, Social and Familial Relationships Between Senators During the Civil War of 49-45BC”

27.11.2017 (DAI)
Ainsley Hawthorn (LMU Munich)
“Hacking Sumerian A Database Approach to the Analysis of Ancient Languages”

11.12.2017 (HU)
Lieve Donnelland (Uni Amsterdam)
“Network analysis as a tool for studying early urbanisation in Italy”

8.1.2018 (DAI)
Sabrina Pietrobono (Università Degli Studi Dell’Aquila)
“GIS tool for interdisciplinary landscape studies”

22.1.2018 (HU)
Simona Stoyanova & Gabriel Bodard (ICS)
“Cataloguing Open Access Classics Serials”

5.2.2018 (DAI)
Francesco Mambrini et al. (DAI)
“The iDAI.publications from open digital publishing to text mining”

OEDUc: Exist-db mashup application

August 2nd, 2017 by pietroliuzzo

Exist-db mashup application working
group

This working group has worked to develop a demo app built with exist-db, a natively XML database which uses XQuery.

The app is ugly, but was built reusing various bits and pieces in a bit less than two days (the day of the unconference and a bit of the following day) and it uses different data sources with different methods to bring together useful resources for an epigraphic corpus and works in most of the cases for the examples we wanted to support. This was possible because exist-db makes it possible and because there were already all the bits available (exist-db, the xslt, the data, etc.)

Code, without data, has been copied to https://github.com/EpiDoc/OEDUc .

The app is accessible, with data from EDH data dumps of July at http://betamasaheft.aai.uni-hamburg.de:8080/exist/apps/OEDUc/

Preliminary twicks to the data included:

  • Adding an @xml:id to the text element to speed up retrival of items in exist. (the xquery doing this is in the AddIdToTextElement.xql file)
  • Note that there is no Pleiades id in the EDH XML (or in any EAGLE dataset), but there are Trismegistos Geo ID! This is because it was planned during the EAGLE project to get all places of provenance in Trismegistos GEO to map them later to Pleiades. This was started using Wikidata mix’n’match but is far from complete and is currently in need for update.

The features

  • In the list view you can select an item. Each item can be edited normally (create, update, delete)
  • The editor that updates files reproduces in simple XSLT a part of the Leiden+ logic and conventions for you to enter data or update existing data. It validates the data after performing the changes against the tei-epidoc.rng schema. Plan is to have it validate before it does the real changes.
  • The search simply searches in a number of indexed elements. It is not a full text index. There are also range indexes set to speed up the queries beside the other indexes shipped with exist.
  • You can create a new entry with the Leiden+ like editor and save it. it will be first validated and in case is not ok you are pointed to the problems. There was not enough times to add the vocabularies and update the editor.
  • Once you view an item you will find in nasty hugly tables a first section with metadata, the text, some additional information on persons and a map:
  • The text exploits some of the parameters of the EpiDoc Stylesheets. You can
    change the desired value, hit change and see the different output.
  • The ids of corresponding inscriptions, are pulled from the EAGLE ids API here in Hamburg, using Trismegistos data. This app will be soon moved to Trismegistos itself, hopefully.
  • The EDH id is instead used to query the EDH data API and get the information about persons, which is printed below the text.
  • For each element with a @ref in the XML files you will find the name of the element and a link to the value. E.g. to link to the EAGLE vocabularies
  • In case this is a TM Geo ID, then the id is used to query Wikidata SPARQL endpoint and retrive coordinates and the corresponding Pleiades id (given those are there). Same logic could be used for VIAF, geonames, etc. This task is done via a http request directly in the xquery powering the app.
  • The Pleiades id thus retrieved (which could be certainly obtained in other ways) is then used in javascript to query Pelagios and print the map below (taken from the hello world example in the Pelagios repository)
  • At http://betamasaheft.aai.uni-hamburg.de/api/OEDUc/places/all and http://betamasaheft.aai.uni-hamburg.de/api/OEDUc/places/all/void two rest XQ function provide the ttl files for Pelagios (but not a dump as required, although this can be done). The places annotations, at the moment only for the first 20 entries. See rest.xql.

Future tasks

For the purpose of having a sample app to help people get started with their projects and see some of the possibilities at work, beside making it a bit nicer it would be useful if this could also have the following:

  • Add more data from EDH-API, especially from edh_geography_uri which Frank has added and has the URI of Geo data; adding .json to this gets the JSON Data of place of finding, which has a “edh_province_uri” with the data about the province.
  • Validate before submitting
  • Add more support for parameters in the EpiDoc example xslt (e.g. for Zotero bibliography contained in div[@type=’bibliography’])
  • Improve the upconversion and the editor with more and more precise matchings
  • Provide functionality to use xpath to search the data
  • Add advanced search capabilities to filter results by id, content provider, etc.
  • Add images support
  • Include all EAGLE data (currently only EDH dumps data is in, but the system scales nicely)
  • Include query to the EAGLE media wiki of translations (api currently unavailable)
  • Show related items based on any of the values
  • Include in the editor the possibility to tag named entities
  • Sync the Epidoc XSLT repository and the eagle vocabularies with a webhook

OEDUc: Disambiguating EDH person RDF working group

July 25th, 2017 by Tom Gheldof

One of the working groups at the Open Epigraphic Data Unconference (OEDUc) meeting in London (May 15, 2017) focussed on disambiguating EDH person RDF. Since the Epigraphic Database Heidelberg (EDH) has made all of its data available to download in various formats in an Open Data Repository, it is possible to extract the person data from the EDH Linked Data RDF.

A first step in enriching this prosopographic data might be to link the EDH person names with PIR and Trismegistos (TM) references. At this moment the EDH person RDF only contains links to attestations of persons, rather than unique individuals (although it attaches only one REF entry to persons who have multiple occurrences in the same text), so we cannot use the EDH person URI to disambiguate persons from different texts.

Given that EDH already contains links to PIR in its bibliography, we could start with extracting (this should be possible using a simple Python script) and linking these to the EDH person REF. In the case where there is only one person attested in a text, the PIR reference can be linked directly to the RDF of that EDH person attestation. If, however (and probably in most cases), there are multiple person references in a text, we should try another procedure (possibly by looking at the first letter of the EDH name and matching it to the alphabetical PIR volume).

A second way of enriching the EDH person RDF could be done by using the Trismegistos People portal. At the moment this database of persons and attestations of persons in texts consists mostly of names from papyri (from Ptolemaic Egypt), but TM is in the process of adding all names from inscriptions (using an automated NER script on the textual data from EDCS via the EAGLE project). Once this is completed, it will be possible to use the stable TM PER ID (for persons) and TM person REF ID (for attestations of persons) identifiers (and URIs) to link up with EDH.

The recommended procedure to follow would be similar to the one of PIR. Whenever there’s a one-to-one relationship with a single EDH person reference the TM person REF ID could be directly linked to it. In case of multiple attestations of different names in an inscription, we could modify the TM REF dataset by first removing all double attestations, and secondly matching the remaining ones to the EDH RDF by making use of the order of appearance (in EDH the person that occurs first in an inscription receives a URI (?) that consists of the EDH text ID and an integer representing the place of the name in the text (e.g., http://edh-www.adw.uni-heidelberg.de/edh/person/HD000001/1 is the first appearing person name in text HD000001). Finally, we could check for mistakes by matching the first character(s) of the EDH name with the first character(s) of the TM REF name. Ultimately, by using the links from the TM REF IDs with the TM PER IDs we could send back to EDH which REF names are to be considered the same person and thus further disambiguating their person RDF data.

This process would be a good step in enhancing the SNAP:DRGN-compliant RDF produced by EDH, which was also addressed in another working group: recommendations for EDH person-records in SNAP RDF.