CFP: Cyborg Classics: An Interdisciplinary Symposium

April 25th, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

We are pleased to announce a one-day symposium, sponsored by BIRTHA (The Bristol Institute for Research in the Humanities and Arts) to be held at the University of Bristol, on Friday July 7th 2017.

Keynote speakers:

  • Dr Kate Devlin (Goldsmiths)
  • Dr Genevieve Liveley (Bristol)
  • Dr Rae Muhlstock (NYU)

The aim of the day is to bring together researchers from different disciplines – scholars in Archaeology & Anthropology, Classics, English, History, and Theology as well as in AI, Robotics, Ethics, and Medicine – to share their work on automata, robots, and cyborgs. Ultimately, the aim is an edited volume and the development of further collaborative research projects.

Indicative key provocations include:

  • To what extent do myths and narratives about automata, robots, and cyborgs raise questions that are relevant to contemporary debates concerning robot, cyborg, and AI product innovation?
  • To what extent, and how, can contemporary debate concerning robot, cyborg, and AI product innovation rescript ancient myths and narratives about automata, robots, and cyborgs.
  • Can interdisciplinary dialogues between the ‘soft’ humanities and the ‘hard’ sciences of robotics and AI be developed? And to what benefit?
  • How might figures such as Pandora, Pygmalion’s statue, and Talos help inform current polarized debates concerning robot, cyborg, and AI ethics?
  • What are the predominant narrative scripts and frames that shape the public understanding of robotics and AI? How could these be re-coded?

We invite scholars working across the range of Classics and Ancient History (including Classical Reception) and across the Humanities more widely to submit expressions of interest and/or a title and abstract (of no more than 250 words) to the symposium coordinator, Silvie Kilgallon (silvie.kilgallon@bristol.ac.uk). PhD students are warmly encouraged to contribute. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is May 31st, 2017.

Research Fellows: Latinization of the north-western provinces

March 22nd, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

I should like to draw your attention to the advertisement for 2 Research Fellows for the 5-year ERC project: the Latinization of the North-Western Provinces: Sociolinguistics, Epigraphy and Archaeology (LatinNow).

The RFs will be based at the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents, University of Oxford, and will start, at the earliest, in September 2017. The positions will be for 3 years, with the possibility of extension.

Although the RFs will be located in Oxford, their contracts will be with the project host, the University of Nottingham, so applications must be made via the Nottingham online system:

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/jobs/currentvacancies/ref/ART002017

Please note that the panel requires basic details to be filled in online and a CV and covering letter to be uploaded (apologies, the generic application system is not clear on what needs to be uploaded). The deadline for applications is the 14th April.

If you would like further information, please do not hesitate to contact the Principal Investigator, Dr Alex Mullen.

Roman Society Summer Placements

March 22nd, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

The Roman Society is pleased to invite applications for its 2017 bursary scheme.  The placements may be held at the following museums / organisations:

Ashmolean Museum, Oxford: http://www.ashmolean.org/

Roman Baths, Bath: http://www.romanbaths.co.uk/

British Museum, Department of Greece and Rome: http://www.britishmuseum.org/

British Museum, Department of Coins and Medals: http://www.britishmuseum.org/

Corbridge Roman Site: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/corbridge-roman-town-hadrians-wall/

The placement will involve supporting the curatorial team in their collections research for the upcoming re-interpretation project at Corbridge museum. The exact nature of the work will depend on the applicant’s interests and experience, and the stage of current work at the time of the placement.

Great North Museum, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne: https://greatnorthmuseum.org.uk/

English Heritage, Properties Historians Team, London: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/

The successful candidate will have the opportunity to complete three different tasks: 1) historical research on an aspect of Roman history, including life in a Roman town, the history of Roman military installations and early-modern / modern literary responses to Roman sites; 2) the interpretation of historical material to the public, including the preparation of display panels, trails and reconstruction drawings; 3) shadowing a historian at project meetings and helping to prepare project documents. These examples are indicative and the exact of the nature of the placement programme will be determined by its timing, project requirements, and a discussion with the candidate.

Institute of Classical Studies: http://ics.sas.ac.uk/

This placement offers the opportunity to gain experience in digital classics research. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to design and implement a small, independent piece of work related to one of the Institute’s projects, for example: a database of persons or names related to a historical source or area; annotating geographical information in visual or textual resources; or library catalogue data related to digital publication. Advanced digital skills are not a requirement, but familiarity with basic tools such as spreadsheets and database tables would be an advantage.

  •  The dates of the placement may be determined by consultation between the successful candidates and institutions but are usually for 2-3 weeks during the summer vacation.
  • All Undergraduate and MA students are eligible to apply.
  • Up to eight bursaries of £250 will be offered as a contribution towards travel or living expenses.
  • Candidates should apply by letter setting out their reasons for wishing to undertake an internship and outlining any previous experience.  You should also provide the name and email address of a referee.
  • You may specify the Museum / organisation you would prefer to be based at, or submit an open application.
  • Queries and letters of application should be addressed to the Secretary, Dr Fiona Haarer, and sent by email by 30 April, 2017 to: office@romansociety.org

Cataloguing Open Access Classics Serials

March 17th, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

The Institute for Classical Studies is pleased to announce the appointment of Simona Stoyanova for one year as a new Research Fellow in Library and Information Science on the Cataloguing Open Access Classics Serials (COACS) project, funded by a development grant from the School of Advanced Study.

COACS will leverage various sites that list or index open access (OA) publications, especially journals and serials, in classics and ancient history, so as to produce a resource that subject libraries may use to automatically catalogue the publications and articles therein. The project is based in the ICS, supervised by the Reader in Digital Classics, Gabriel Bodard, and the Combined Library, with the support of Paul Jackson and Sue Willetts. Other digital librarians and scholars including Richard Gartner and Raphaële Mouren in the Warburg Institute; Patrick Burns and Tom Elliott from the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (NYU); Charles Jones from Penn State; and Matteo Romanello from the German Archaeological Institute are providing further advice.

Major stages of work will include:

  1. Survey of AWOL: We shall assess the regularity of metadata in the open access journals listed at AWOL (which currently lists 1521 OA periodicals, containing a little over 50,000 articles), and estimate what proportion of these titles expose metadata in standard formats that would enable harvesting in a form amenable to import into library catalogues. A certain amount of iteration and even manual curation of data is likely to be necessary. The intermediate dataset will need to be updated and incremented over time, rather than overwritten entirely on each import.
  2. Intermediate data format: We will also decide on the intermediate format (containing MARC data), which in addition to being ingested by the Combined Library will be made available for use by other libraries (e.g. NYU Library and the German Archaeological Institute’s Zenon catalogue). The addition of catalogued OA serials and articles to the library catalogue will significantly contribute to the research practice of scholars and other library users, enabling new research outputs from the Institute and enhancing the open access policy of the School.
  3. Further OA indexes: Once the proof-of-concept is in place, and data is being harvested from AWOL (and tested that they update rather than overwriting or duplicating pre-existing titles), we shall experiment with harvesting similar data from other indexes of OA content, such as DOAJ, OLH, Persée, DialNet, TOCS-IN, and perhaps even institutional repositories.
  4. Publish open access software: All code for harvesting OA serials and articles, and for ingest by library catalogues will be made available through Github. This code will then be available for updating the intermediate data to take advantage of new titles that are added to AWOL and other resources, and new issues of serials that are already listed. This will enable reuse of our scripts and data by other libraries and similar institutions.

By the end of the pilot project, we will have: made available and documented the intermediate dataset and harvesting and ingest code; performed a test ingest of the data into the ICS library catalogue; engaged known (NYU, Zenon, BL) and newly discovered colleagues in potentially adding to and using this data; explored the possibility of seeking external funding to take this project further.

We consider this project to be a pilot for further work, for which we intend to seek external funding once a proof of concept is in place. We hope to be able to build on this first phase of work by: extending the methods to other disciplines, especially those covered by the other institute libraries in SAS; enabling the harvest of full-text from serials whose license permit it, for search and other textual research such as text-mining and natural language processing; disambiguating enhancing the internal and external bibliographical references to enable hyperlinks to primary and secondary sources where available.

Yale University Library seeks Digital Scholarship Project Manager

March 2nd, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

Yale University offers exciting opportunities for achievement and growth in New Haven, Connecticut. Conveniently located between Boston and New York, New Haven is the creative capital of Connecticut with cultural resources that include two major art museums, a critically-acclaimed repertory theater, state-of-the-art concert hall, and world-renowned schools of Architecture, Art, Drama, and Music.

Position Focus: Yale University seeks a Project Manager (PM) who will be responsible for coordination and completion of projects for Digital Scholarship Services (DSS) in the Yale University Library. This position will oversee all aspects of digital scholarship project management by setting deadlines, assigning responsibilities, and monitoring and summarizing progress of projects. The PM will prepare reports for upper management regarding status of projects and be familiar with a variety of digital scholarship concepts, practices, and procedures. Relying on experience and judgment, the PM will plan and accomplish goals by performing a variety of tasks across a spectrum of technologies and digital services. A wide degree of creativity and latitude is expected. Reports to the Director of Digital Scholarship Services.
Read the rest of this entry »

CFP: Digital Textual Editions and Corpora

February 8th, 2017 by Tom Elliott

Digital Classics Association
Call for papers for the January 4-7, 2018 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Boston

“Digital Textual Editions and Corpora”

Organizer: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY ncoffee@buffalo.edu

The discovery, editing, and publication of classical texts has been a foundational activity in the study of antiquity. The creation of born-digital editions of classical texts and of digital textual corpora has led to a resurgence of interest in the curation and editing of texts, so that they can be made more broadly accessible online and enhanced with features only possible through digital representation. The aim of this panel is to inform the SCS membership and engage them in a discussion regarding the current state of the art in the curation and publication of digital editions and corpora, as well as likely future directions. Abstracts are invited in two complementary areas. Scholars with experience working with contemporary digital editions and corpora are invited to discuss their experience. This might involve creating a digital edition or corpus, or it might involve a research project that intensively engaged with one. Scholars who have set up digital corpora and/or editing environments, or who work on conventions or other software that underlie such corpora are invited to relate their experience as well. Papers can address completed work, but can also be devoted partly or entirely to ongoing work, problems, or challenges.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously in accordance with SCS regulations. Submitters should confirm in their emails that they are SCS members in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the SCS website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is March 1, 2017.

SCS website version: https://goo.gl/m21JQG

Digital Classicist London 2017 CFP

January 30th, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

The Digital Classicist London seminar invites proposals with a focus on the needs of users/readers, for the summer 2017 season, which will run on Friday afternoons in June and July in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London.

We welcome proposals in any area of classics, including ancient history, archaeology and reception, that employ digital or other innovative and collaborative approaches to the study of the ancient world (including cultures beyond the Mediterranean). Researchers of all levels, including students and professional practitioners, are welcome, and we expect a diverse audience of philologists and historians, information scientists and digital humanists, graduate students and interested members of the public.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a paper, please email an abstract of up to 500 words as an attachment to gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk by March 19th, 2017.

The seminar is organized by Gabriel Bodard, Simon Mahony, Eleanor Robson, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale. For full details, and previous years’ programmes, see http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2017.html

Classical Philology Goes Digital, University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017

January 23rd, 2017 by Monica Berti

Classical Philology Goes Digital. Working on Textual Phenomena of Ancient Texts
University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017

Organization: Karen Blaschka (Universität Potsdam) and Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig)
Funded by the Volkswagen Stiftung

Thursday, February 16, 2017
9.00
Welcome Address by the Vice Dean Prof. Dr. Johannes Haag
Opening (Monica Berti / Karen Blaschka)

I. DH-keynote-speakers (part I)
Chair: Neil Coffee (University at Buffalo)
9.30
Gregory R. Crane (Universität Leipzig/Tufts University), Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age
10:10
Franz Fischer (CCeH / IDE Köln), Digital Philology and the (cr)apparatus

10.50
Coffee Break

Chair: Gregory R. Crane (Universität Leipzig/Tufts University)
11:10
Francesco Mambrini (DAI, Berlin), The Syntax of Similes. A Treebank-based Exploration of Simile in Greek Poetry
11:50
Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig), Documenting Text Reuse of Greek Fragmentary Authors
12.30
Break for lunch

II. Project presentations (part I)
Chair: Karen Blaschka (Universität Potsdam)
13.30
Maria Vasiloudi, Carl W. Brunschön (Universität des Saarlandes/BBAW Berlin), Iatrosophia-digital: Die Rezeption antiker medizinischer Texte in griechischen Iatrosophia-Handschriften vom 13. bis 19. Jh.
Marie Revellio (Zukunftskolleg Universität Konstanz), Citation Practices in Jerome’s Letters as Vestigia of Late Antique Identit Construction
14.50
Coffee Break Read the rest of this entry »

Digital Approaches and the Ancient World, BICS 59-2 (2016)

January 20th, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

BICS 59-2 coverThe Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies is very happy to announce the publication of issue 59-2, the last issue of 2016, edited by Gabriel Bodard, Yanne Broux and Ségolène Tarte, on the theme of Digital Approaches and the Ancient World.

BICS is a print journal, published by Wiley-Blackwell, also available in electronic form to subscribers through their online library.

Section I, Near East, with articles by: J. Troy Samuels; Stéphane Polis & Vincent Razanajao.

Section II, History and Landscape, with articles by: Adam Rabinowitz et al.; Chiara Palladino; Elaine Sullivan.

Section III, Greek and Latin, with articles by: Neel Smith; Gloria Mugelli et al.; Monica Berti et al.; Justin A. Stover & Mike Kestermont.

Contents at Wiley Online Library: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bics.2016.59.issue-2/issuetoc

Table of contents at ICS Publications: http://ics.sas.ac.uk/node/1009

EpiDoc training workshop, London, April 2017

January 17th, 2017 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications to participate in a training workshop on digital editing of papyrological and epigraphic texts, at the Institute of Classical Studies, London, April 3–7, 2017. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard and Lucia Vannini (ICS) and Simona Stoyanova (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc: Ancient Documents in XML

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the online Papyrological Editor tool.

The workshop will assume knowledge of papyrology or epigraphy; Greek, Latin or another ancient language; and the Leiden Conventions. No technical skills are required, and scholars of all levels, from students to professors, are welcome. To apply, please email gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk with a brief description of your background and reason for application, by February 14, 2017.

(Revised to bring back deadline for applications to Feb 14th.)

Sunoikisis Digital History and Archaeology, Fall 2016

October 5th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

The fall programme of the Sunoikisis Digital Classics course has just started, with online sessions via YouTube on Thursdays at 16h00 UK/11h00 New York. This semester, focussed on objects, space and heritage data, rus in parallel with courses taught at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London (ICS03), and Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University (ISAW-GA-3024), and includes contributions from colleagues and students worldwide.

The full programme can be found on Github at SunoikisisDC, and the sessions will be streamed on our YouTube channel.

  1. Sep 29. Introduction: Object artefact script (Gabriel Bodard)
  2. Oct 6. 3D Imaging, Photogrammetry (Sebastian Heath)
  3. Oct 13. Geography 1: Gazetteers (Valeria Vitale, Usama Gad and Gabriel Bodard)
  4. Oct 20. 3D Modelling, Computer Aided Design (Valeria Vitale)
  5. Oct 27. Geography 2: Carto (Tom Elliott)
  6. Nov 3. Geography 3: GIS (Leif Isaksen)
  7. Nov 10. Ontologies and Data Modelling (Arianna Ciula and Charlotte Tupman)
  8. Nov 17. Data Structuring and Querying (Tom Elliott and Sebastian Heath)
  9. Nov 24. Data Visualization (Jonathan Blaney, Sarah Milligan, Jane Winters)
  10. Dec 1. Network Analysis (Silke Vanbeselaere and Greg Woolf)
  11. Dec 8. Crowdsourcing Heritage and Conservation (John Pearce)
  12. Dec 15. Historical sources (Monica Berti)

All are welcome to follow these sessions remotely (live or after the event). Please get in touch if you would like to get involved more directly with these or future Sunoikisis DC programmes.

Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2016/17

October 4th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

We are delighted to announce that the final programme for this year’s Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin is now online. You can find it at <http://de.digitalclassicist.org/berlin/seminar2016> and below.

The seminar series will start on Oct. 18 with a keynote by Silvia Polla (TOPOI) entitled “Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey.”

Seminars take place on Tuesdays (starting at 17:00 c.t.) on a fortnightly basis at the TOPOI building Dahlem or at the DAI.

We would also like to draw your attention to the possibility for students to attend the seminar as part of their curriculum. The seminar is now part of the academic programme of the Freie Universität under the name “Digitale Methoden in den Altertumswissenschaften” (see the FU’s course catalog <http://www.fu-berlin.de/vv/de/lv/315967>).

The seminar is recognised with 5 credit points (ECTS): this requires the attendance of the seminars and a 15 minute poster presentation on one of the topics covered by the seminar series. The poster presentations can be either in English or German and will take place after the end of the seminars on 18.4.2017 in the TOPOI building Dahlem.

Programme

18.10.2016
Silvia Polla (TOPOI)
“Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey”

1.11.2016
Undine Lieberwirth & Axel Gering (TOPOI)
“3D GIS in archaeology – a micro-scale analysis”

15.11.2016
Duncan Keenan-Jones (Glasgow)
“Digital Experimental Archaeology: Hero of Alexandria and his Automata in CAD”

29.11.2016
Chiara Palladino & Tariq Youssef (Leipzig)
“iAligner: a tool for syntax-based intra-language text alignment”

13.12.2016
Christian Prager (Bonn)
“Of Codes, Glyphs and Kings: Tasks, Limits and Approaches in the Encoding of Classic Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions”

10.1.2017
Wolfgang Schmidle et al. (DAI)
“chronOntology: A time gazetteer with principles”

24.1.2017
Nathan Gibson (Vanderbilt)
“Toward a Cyberinfrastructure for Syriac Literature: Mapping a Text Corpus using TEI and RDF”

7.2.2017
Katherine Crawford (Southampton)
“In the Footsteps of the Gods: network approach to modeling Roman Religious Processions”

21.2.2017
Aline Deicke (Mainz)
“From E19 to MATCH and MERGE. Mapping the CIDOC CRM to graph databases as an environment for archaeological network research”

The Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG) is online

September 11th, 2016 by Monica Berti

The Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG) is a project directed by Monica Berti at the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig for producing the digital version of the five volumes of the Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (FHG) edited by Karl Müller in the 19th century.

The FHG consists of a survey of excerpts from many different sources pertaining to more than 600 Greek fragmentary authors. Excluding the first volume, authors are chronologically distributed and cover a period of time from the 6th century BC through the 7th century CE. Fragments are numbered sequentially and arranged according to works and book numbers, when these pieces of information are available in the source texts preserving the fragments. Every Greek fragment is translated or summarized into Latin.

The digital version of FHG vol. 1 is now available online with search functionalities and citation extraction (CTS and CITE URNs). It collects the fragments of 6th-4th century authors (Hecataeus of Miletus, Charon of Lampsacus, Xanthus of Lydia, Hellanicus of Lesbos, Pherecydes of Athens, Acusilaus of Argos, Ephorus of Cuma, Theopompus of Chius, and Phylarchus), Apollodorus of Athens (with fragments of the Bibliotheca), historians of Sicily (Antiochus of Syracuse, Philistus of Syracuse, Timaeus of Tauromenius), and the Atthidographers (Clidemus, Phanodemus, Androtio, Demo, Philochorus, and Ister).

DFHG

Book launch invitation: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange & Public Engagement

May 27th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

We would like to invite you to a launch event on June 10th, with the Institute of Classical Studies and Ubiquity Press, for the recently published volume:

Bodard G. & Romanello M. 2016. Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange & Public Engagement. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/bat

A limited number of print copies of the book will be available to view and purchase, and several authors will be present to discuss their chapters and the work as a whole. Wine and refreshments will be provided.

18:00 Friday June 10, 2016
2nd floor lobby, south block, Senate House, Malet St, London WC1E 7HU
(Note this event follows the Digital Classicist seminar, 16:30 room 234, see digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2016.html)

Please also feel free to display or circulate the attached poster.

We hope to see many of you there!

Digital Classicist London: 2016 seminars

May 16th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Classicist Seminar

Institute of Classical Studies
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
Fridays at 16:30 in room 234

Jun 3 Gregory Crane (Leipzig & Tufts), Philological Education and Citizenship in the 21st Century
Jun 10 Matteo Romanello (Lausanne & DAI), Of People, Places and References: Extracting information from Classics publications
Jun 17 Eleanor Robson (University College London), From the ground to the cloud: digital edition of freshly excavated cuneiform tablets on Oracc
Jun 24 Stuart Dunn (King’s College London), Reading text with GIS: Different digital lenses for Ancient World Geography
Jul 1 Valeria Vitale (King’s College London), Rethinking 3D visualisation: from illustration to research tool
Jul 8 Chiara Palladino (Leipzig & Bari), Annotating geospatial patterns in ancient texts: problems and strategies
Jul 15 Daniel Pett (British Museum) & George Oates (Museum in a Box), 3D in Museums; Museums in 3D
Jul 22 Stelios Chronopoulos (Freiburg), New Life into Old Courses? Using Digital Tools in Reading and Prose Composition Classes
Jul 29 Silke Vanbeselaere (KU Leuven), Exploring ancient sources with data visualisation

digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2016.html

Each seminar will offer an overview of the subject suitable for postgraduate students or interested colleagues in Archaeology, Classics, Digital Humanities and related fields, along with suggested reading, practical exercise and discussion topics. No advance preparation is required, but you will get the most out of these seminars if you check out the short bibliographies suggested on the programme website.

ALL WELCOME

Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age

May 10th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

The School of Advanced Study, London sponsors an S T Lee Visiting Professorial Fellowship. This year it is held by Greg Crane, Humboldt Professor of the Humanities at the University of Leipzig. During May and June he will be lecturing and holding events around the UK on the theme Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age.

The opening event, Global Philology, will be take place at the ICS (Senate House, room 349) on 17th May, 5.30 and will be a round table discussion with Dr Imre Galambos (Cambridge), Professor Eleanor Robson (UCL), Dr Sarah Savant (Aga Khan University), Dr Michael Willis (British Museum) and will explore the question of what Classics can realistically mean in a century where China, India (with its six official Classical languages), and the various nations of the Arabic and Persian-speaking world play an active role in shaping global cultures. It will be followed by a reception.

All are welcome.

The full programme is listed below and also available at
http://www.icls.sas.ac.uk/events/greek-latin-and-digital-philology-global-age

*Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age*

Tuesday, May 17, 17:30-19:30, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 349: “Global Philology, Greco-Roman Studies, and Classics in the 21st Century,” round table with Imre Galambos, Eleanor Robson, Sarah Savant and Michael Willis.

Friday, May 20, 16:00-17:30, University of Glasgow: “Europe, Europeana and the Greco-Roman World.”

Monday, May 23, 13:00-14:00: Oxford University Faculty of Classics, first floor seminar room, Epigraphy Workshop: “What are the possibilities for epigraphic (and papyrological) sources in a digital age?”

Tuesday, May 24, 14:00-16:00, Oxford University: Seminar, Main lecture theatre, Faculty of Classics: “What would a smart edition look like and why should we care?”

Friday, May 27, 12:00-13:30, University of Manchester: Seminar, “Greek into Arabic, Arabic into Latin, and reinterpretation of what constitutes Western Civilization.”

Tuesday, June 1, 5.30-6.30, Durham University,seminar room, Dept. of Classics and Ancient History “Digital Philology and Greco-Roman Culture as the grand challenge of Reception Studies.”

Friday, June 3, 16:30-18:00, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 234: “Philological Education and Citizenship in the 21st Century.”

Queries to valerie.james@sas.ac.uk.

Institute of Classical Studies Library survey

May 10th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

A message from the Institute of Classical Studies and Joint Library, University of London:

Please help us improve our services by taking a few minutes to complete our 2016 survey and letting us know your views about the ICS / Joint Library. The survey, open to all users of our library, is available online at http://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/ICS-JL-SURVEY or you can use one of the printed forms available from the library reception desk on the 3rd Floor of Senate House. The closing date for responses is midnight on Saturday 14th May 2016. If you have any problems completing the survey, please contact library staff by email: iclass.enquiries@london.ac.uk; or phone 020 7862 8709. Details of the results of the survey will be published here in due course. Responses may be used for publicity material or for publicising survey results but all comments will remain anonymous.

Workshop Digital Classics (Freiburg, Jun 30–Jul 1, 2016)

May 3rd, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

WORKSHOP: Digital Classics: Editing, Interpreting, Teaching
Thursday, 30th June 2016, and Friday, 1st July 2016.
Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Germany

This workshop, sponsored by the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, Germany, is part of the project “Der digital turn in den Altertumswissenschaften: Wahrnehmung – Dokumentation – Reflexion“ (Dr Stelios Chronopoulos, PD Dr Felix K Maier, Dr Anna Novokhatko).

Digital tools and technologies have led to significant changes in Classics during the past 10 to 15 years. Methods and scientific practice have been adjusted, both to adapt to the new environment and to open up novel possibilities. In the course of these transitions it is essential to discuss changes and consequences that will affect teaching, researching and publishing in Classics.

A conference, taking place from the 30th June to the 1st July, will address these questions: three groups of experts (organized in three panels) will discuss three major topics in Digital Classics. The first day of the conference will be internal work closed to public. The second day will be a public discussion where the results of each group will be presented. This discussion starts at 10.00am on Friday (1st July) and will end at 5.00pm (University of Freiburg, KGI 2004 and 3024, updates on www.texte-messen.uni-freiburg.de).

The three panels will be:

1) Digital Tools for Teaching Classics: Dr Marco Büchler (Göttingen), Dr Stefan Faller (Freiburg), Emily Franzini (Göttingen), Prof Dr Christian Mair (Freiburg), Prof Dr Peter von Moellendorff (Gießen)
2) Digital Editions – visualization, annotation, structuring: Dr Leif Isaksen (Lancaster), Prof Dr Donald Mastronarde (Berkeley), Jun Prof Dr Brigitte Mathiak (Cologne), Prof Dr Patrick Sahle (Cologne), Prof Dr Stefan Schorn (Leuven)
3) Open access and digital publishing: Georgios Chatzoudis (Düsseldorf), Prof Dr Marcus Deufert (Leipzig), Dr Niels Taubert (Bielefeld), Dr Lilian Landes (Munich), Dr Stefan von der Lahr (Munich)

In addition there will be a public panel discussion on Thursday (30th June) at 6.00pm on the consequences of open access in academia:
Roland Reuß (University of Heidelberg) and Hubertus Kohle (University of Munich).

For further information please contact
Felix.maier@geschichte.uni-freiburg.de

Digital Classics outside the Echo-Chamber: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange and Public Engagement

April 29th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

We’re delighted to announce the publication of the latest volume of essays arising in part from the Digital Classicist seminars in London, Berlin and elsewhere, as an open access publication.

Gabriel Bodard and Matteo Romanello (2016). Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange and Public Engagement. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/bat

cover

Thanks to the generosity of the Knowledge Unlatched programme, this volume is available as Gold Open Access—i.e. you can freely download PDF, Epub or Kindle versions from the publisher’s site under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Print copies are also available for £34.99 hc, £12.99 pb. Review copies will be circulated to appropriate journals and similar venues.

Classical Philology goes digital (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

April 20th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts

University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017
http://www.uni-potsdam.de/klassphil/workshop-classical-philology-goes-digital.html

Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods.
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Epigraphy Editathon, (April 20-22, 2016 – Leipzig)

April 3rd, 2016 by Monica Berti

Epigraphy Editathon (Editing chronological and geographic data in ancient inscriptions)
April 20-22, 2016
Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities – University of Leipzig
Augustusplatz 10, 04109 Leipzig
P 402

April 20, 2016

Morning (paper presentations)
09:00-09:15: Monica Berti: Welcome and Introduction
09:15-09:45: Charlotte Roueché (King’s College London): Making the stones speak
09:45-10:15: Michèle Brunet (Université Lyon 2): IG Louvre: developments and issues – A case study
10:15-10:45: Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig): The Digital Marmor Parium
10:45-11:15: Coffee Break
11:15-11:45: Artemis Karnava (Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften): The Cypriot syllabary of the 1st mill. BC: yet another writing system for the Greek language
11:45-12:15: Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Berlin): Telling stories with the inscription. The EAGLE Storytelling App and beyond
12:15-13:00: Discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: DĀMOS – Database of Mycenean at Oslo (Federico Aurora, University of Oslo)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: Data and standards in the iDAI.world (Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank, DAI Berlin)
17:00-18:00: Editing inscriptions in Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 21, 2016

Morning (paper/projects presentations)
09:00-09:30: Silvia Orlandi (Università La Sapienza Roma): Chronological and geographical information in Latin inscriptions: examples and issues
09:30-10:00: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University): Treebanks and meter in 4th century Attic inscriptions
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:00: Chiara Palladino (Università di Bari / Leipzig Universität): Numbers, winds and stars: representing the ancient geographical language in the digital environment
11:00-11:30: Anita Rocco (Università di Bari): Remarks about time and places in the inscriptions by Christians in Rome
11:30-12:00: Martin Scholz (Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg): EDEN, An Epigraphic Web Database of Ancient Inscriptions
12:00-13:00: Gregory Crane (Tufts University / Universität Leipzig): Perseus and Leipzig developments and general discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: Classroom epigraphy assignments with Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu and Tim Buckingham, Tufts University)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: EDR – Epigraphic Database Roma (Silvia Evangelisti, Università di Foggia)
17:00-18:00: Pelagios (Rainer Simon, Austrian Institute of Technology)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 22, 2016

Morning (projects/standards presentations)
9:00-10:00: EAGLE Project (Pietro Liuzzo, Universität Heidelberg)
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:30: GODOT: Graph of Dated Objects and Texts (Frank Grieshaber, Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften and Universität Heidelberg)
11:30-12:30: Towards Guidelines for TEI encoding of text artefacts in Egyptology (Daniel Werning, Excellence Cluster Topoi, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)
12:30-13:00: Trismegistos Places: a geographical index for all Latin inscriptions (Herbert Verreth, Leuven University)

Afternoon
14:30-16:30: Round Table

UCLDH Seminar

March 21st, 2016 by Simon Mahony

Details of the upcoming seminar in the UCLDH 2016 series follow:

The ancient cultures of Sumer, Assyria and Babylonia have left a rich written legacy, in the form of many hundreds of thousands of clay tablets, inscribed in the complex, wedge-shaped cuneiform script. Over the past two centuries these artefacts, dating from c.3000 BC to c.100 AD, have been excavated from archaeological sites across the Middle East, particularly Iraq and Syria, and are now housed in many different museums around the world.

For several decades now there has been a concerted effort to catalogue, photograph, edit and analyse these most precious witnesses of the first half of history. The editorial and analytical effort has been spearheaded by Oracc.org, the Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus, co-directed by Professor Eleanor Robson here at UCL, along with international colleagues.

On Wednesday 27th April 2016, Eleanor Robson, along with Raquel Alegre of RITS, will give a seminar presenting a new editorial interface they have been working on for Oracc, that will hopefully enable a significant number of less technophile colleagues to contribute to the project. They will explain what Oracc does and why it matters, why new software was needed, and how it improves the editorial experience.

All welcome and there will be drinks and discussion after the talk.
Please note that registration is required: https://ucldhseminarritsoracc.eventbrite.co.uk

Summer School in Digital Humanities (Sep 2016, Hissar, Bulgaria)

March 3rd, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

The Centre for Excellence in the Humanities to the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, organizes jointly with an international team of lecturers and researchers in the field of Digital Humanities a Summer School in Digital Humanities. The Summer School will take place between 05-10 September 2016 and is targeted at historians, archaeologists, classical scholars, philologists, museum and conservation workers, linguists, researchers in translation and reception studies, specialists in cultural heritage and cultural management, textual critics and other humanitarians with little to moderate skills in IT who would like to enhance their competences. The Summer School will provide four introductory modules on the following topics:

  • Text encoding and interchange by Gabriel Bodard, University of London, and Simona Stoyanova, King’s College London: TEI, EpiDoc XML (http://epidoc.sourceforge.net/), marking up of epigraphic monuments, authority lists, linked open data for toponymy and prosopography: SNAP:DRGN (http://snapdrgn.net/), Pelagios (http://pelagios-project.blogspot.bg/), Pleiades (http://pleiades.stoa.org/).
  • Text and image annotation and alignment by Simona Stoyanova, King’s College London, and Polina Yordanova, University of Sofia: SoSOL Perseids tools (http://perseids.org), Arethusa grammatical annotation and treebanking of texts, Alpheios text and translation alignment, text/image alignment tools.
  • Geographical Information Systems and Neogeography by Maria Baramova, University of Sofia, and Valeria Vitale, King’s College London: Historical GIS, interactive map layers with historical information, using GeoNames (http://www.geonames.org/) and geospatial data, Recogito tool for Pelagios.
  • 3D Imaging and Modelling for Cultural Heritage by Valeria Vitale, King’s College London: photogrammetry, digital modelling of indoor and outdoor objects of cultural heritage, Meshmixer (http://www.meshmixer.com/), Sketchup (http://www.sketchup.com/) and others.

The school is open for applications by MA and PhD students and postdoc and early researchers from all humanitarian disciplines, as well as employees in the field of cultural heritage. The applicants should send a CV and a Motivation statement clarifying their specific needs and expressing interest in one or more of the modules no later than 15.05.2016. The places are limited and you will be notified about your acceptance within 10 working days after the application deadline. Transfer from Sofia to Hissar and back, accommodation and meal expenses during the Summer School are covered by the organizers. Five scholarships of 250 euro will be accorded by the organizing committee to the participants whose work and motivation are deemed the most relevant and important.

The participation fee is 40 еurо. It covers coffee breaks, social programme and materials for the participants.

Please submit your applications to dimitar.illiev@gmail.com.

ORGANISING COMMITTEE
Assoc. Prof. Dimitar Birov (Department of Informatics, University of Sofia)
Dr. Maria Baramova (Department of Balkan History, University of Sofia)
Dr. Dimitar Iliev (Department of Classics, University of Sofia)
Mirela Hadjieva (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)
Dobromir Dobrev (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)
Kristina Ferdinandova (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 11-15, 2016

February 24th, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 11-15, 2016. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (ICS), Simona Stoyanova (KCL) and Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg / Hamburg). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the online Papyrological Editor and Perseids platforms.

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek/Latin or other ancient language, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email pietro.liuzzo@zaw.uni-heidelberg.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by 6th March 2016. Please use as subject of your email “[EPIDOC LONDON 2016] application <yourname>”.

Unlocking the Digital Humanities (Tufts and Leipzig, Feb 29–May 2)

February 23rd, 2016 by Gabriel Bodard

Unlocking the Digital Humanities

http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x

An Open Research Series organized by the Tufts Department of Classics and by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig.

Talks will take place in Eaton Hall on the Medford Campus of Tufts University and in Paulinum 402 at the University of Leipzig. All talks will be broadcast as Google Hangouts and published on Youtube.

The URLs for the Google Hangouts and for the Youtube recordings will be posted at http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x.

Part 1. Introducing Digital Humanities

What is digital humanities? Why does it matter to you? All humanities disciplines welcome.

29 Feb, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Language, Digital Philology and the Humanities in a Global Society.

Gregory Crane, Winnick Family Chair and Professor of Classics, Tufts University; Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

2 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Digital Humanities: Everything you wanted to know but haven’t yet asked.

Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

7 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods.

Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig.

Melinda Johnston, prev. Cartoon Specialist, National Library of New Zealand

Part 2. Digital Humanities Showcase

Ask the experts! Hear and discuss use-cases of recent DH research and teaching.

10 Mar, 4:00-5:00pm, Eaton 123
Valid and Verified Undergraduate Research.
Christopher Blackwell, Forgione University Professor, Furman University
Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Assistant Professor, Tufts University

14 Mar, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
eLearning and Computational Language Research.
Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, Leipzig

4 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Rediscovery of Postclassical Latin and European Culture.
Neven Jovanovic, Associate Professor of Latin, University of Zagreb
Petra Sostaric, Lecturer, University of Zagreb

11 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Visualizing Literary and Historical Social Networks.
Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor of English, Northeastern University

11 Apr, 5:00-6:00pm, Eaton 123
From Archive to Corpus: Bottom-Up Bibliography for Millions of Books.
David A Smith, Assistant Professor College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University

25 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Spatial and Chronological Patterns in Historical Texts.
Maxim Romanov, Postdoctoral Researcher, Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

27 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Digital Art History.
Chiara Pidatella, Lecturer in Art History, Tufts

2 May, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Representing Influence: writing about text reuse when everything is online.
Ioannis Evrigenis, Professor of Political Science, Tufts University
Monica Berti, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

For information, contact Thomas Koentges (thomas.koentges@tufts.edu) at Tufts or Matt Munson (munson@dh.uni-leipzig.de) at Leipzig.