Ontologies for Prosopography: workshop at DH 2014, Lausanne (July 8)

April 10th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Humanities 2014: Workshop
Lausanne, Switzerland
8th July, 2014

To register, go to the Digital Humanities 2014 website.

Ontologies for Prosopography: Who’s Who? or, Who was Who?

Linked data has become an increasingly popular fixture in digital humanities research because it offers a way to break out of the data silos that are constantly being created, and provides a framework for new ways of approaching research questions. Tim Berners-Lee’s four principles of linked data, however, remind us that global identifiers for entities – URIs – provide only a part of what is needed if linked data is to fulfil its promise.  As much as possible, we also need common semantic frameworks to better tie the data together – what are called “ontologies”.

In a seminal paper way back in 1993 Thomas Gruber defined an ontology as an “explicit specification of a shared conceptualisation”. We will be focusing on possibilities for an ontology for prosopography because, for historical data at least, people, places and textual sources are likely to be the three pillars upon which a structure of linked data can be constructed, and these three things are likely to be the primary entry point for a collection of linked historical data. While methodologies for dealing with textual sources are being continually refined, the success of the Pelagios project has demonstrated how historical geographic information, in this case classical, can be used to bring together a wide variety of projects. This workshop will address the issues of bringing linked data to the description of historical persons with the morning session devoted to exploring the question of whether there are sufficient common concepts – a shared conceptualisation – to enable for the practical and useful development of an ontology for historical persons, and the afternoon addressing the challenges of linking these descriptions together to create a shared resource.

Read the rest of this entry »

BICS Supplement 122: THE DIGITAL CLASSICIST 2013

April 7th, 2014 by Simon Mahony

We are very pleased to announce the publication of the latest Digital Classicist volume, The Digital Classicist 2013, published by the Institute of Classical Studies, London as part of their BICS series.

SUPP-122-flyer_Page_1_Image_0001
This edited volume collects together peer-reviewed papers that initially emanated from presentations at Digital Classicist seminars and conference panels.

For full details see the publisher’s site and the promotional flyer.

Please ask your library to order a copy.

Digital Classicist London seminars, 2014

April 3rd, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014

Fridays at 16:30 in room G37* Senate House
Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU
* Unless otherwise specified below

June 6* Ségolène Tarte (Oxford), On Cognition and the Digital in the Study of Ancient Textual Artefacts 103 (Holden Room)
June 13* Victoria Moul & Charlotte Tupman (King’s College London), Neo-Latin poetry in English manuscripts, 1550-1700 103 (Holden Room)
June 20 Lorna Richardson (University College London), Public Archaeology in a Digital Age
June 27 Monica Berti, Greta Franzini & Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig), The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects
July 4* Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg), The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data 102 (Athlone Room)
July 11 Silke Vanbeselaere (Leuven), Retracing Theban Witness Networks in Demotic Contracts
July 18* Thibault Clérice (King’s College London), Clotho: Network Analysis and Distant Reading on Perseus Latin Corpus G34
July 25* Marja Vierros (Helsinki), Papyrology and Linguistic Annotation: How can we make TEI EpiDoc XML corpus and Treebanking work together? G35
Aug 1 Sebastian Rahtz (Oxford) & Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relations in Greco-Roman Names (SNAP:DRGN)
Aug 8 Dominic Oldman & Barry Norton (British Museum), A new approach to Digital Editions of Ancient Manuscripts using CIDOC-CRM, FRBRoo and RDFa
Aug 15 Various postgraduate speakers, Short presentations

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk, Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk, S.Mahony@ucl.ac.uk or Charlotte.Tupman@kcl.ac.uk, or see the seminar website at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2014.html

Artistic practice and language learning, Grenoble, Jan 28-30, 2015

March 27th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Call for papers

International symposium, within the context of
ARC 5 – Cultures, Sciences, Sociétés et Médiations
Rhône-Alpes Region (France)
Operation Fabula agitur !

Fabula agitur !
Theatrical and artistic practices, oracy, and the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures
History, Aesthetics, Didactics

Grenoble University (France), January 28-30, 2015

In recent years, specialists in language instruction have paid much attention to the contribution of theatrical practices – and, more broadly speaking, of artistic practices - to the learning of modern languages. This symposium intends to look into a body of work that has so far been neglected: artistic practices used as a way to teach Ancient Languages, whether at school, college, or in local associations, in France and abroad.

For a long time now, however, there have been many examples of such practices. The Educational Theatre of Jesuit colleges, used from the sixteenth century onwards, is one of the most famous examples. Indeed, this type of practice is remarkable because of its wide audience as well as its ‘holistic’ educational approach. Nowadays, Ancient Language teachers may organize Olympiades, tiny drama workshops, unpolished performances or even erudite pageants to provide their pupils with a different approach to Ancient Languages and Cultures. Thanks to the stage, acting and oracy, this approach may be more physical and more emotional than those they are used to encountering in the classroom, in terms of what the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) calls “knowledge”, “skills” and “existential competences” (three macro-categories that apply to each form of learning).

The symposium will be held at Stendhal University – Grenoble III (France) from January 28 to January 30, 2015. Conference participants will be offered short training sessions on Ancient Language theatre as well as two theatrical performances which will clearly display the benefits of artistic practices for the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures.

Communication and workshop proposals should be sent to Malika Bastin-Hammou (Malika.Bastin@u-grenoble3.fr) and Filippo Fonio (Filippo.Fonio@u-grenoble3.fr) before July 01, 2014. They should be written as a presentation, and not exceed 1,500 characters. Scientific committee decisions will be made available on October 01, 2014 at the latest.

Appel à communication-Fabula agitur (PDF: French & English)

TEI Hackathon workshop at DH2014 (July 7)

March 25th, 2014 by Hugh Cayless

Call for Participation

We are inviting applications to participate in the TEI Hackathon full day workshop that will be held on July 7, 2014, as a pre-conference session at DH2014 (http://dh2014.org/).

Digital humanists, librarians, publishers, and many others use the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines to mark up electronic texts, and over time have created a critical mass of XML — some conforming to known subsets of the TEI Guidelines, some to individual customizations; in some cases intricate and dense, in others lean and expedient; some enriched with extensive external  metadata, others with details marked explicitly in the text. The fruits of this labor are most often destined for display online or on paper (!), indexing, and more rarely, visualisation. Techniques of processing this markup beyond display and indexing are less well-understood and not accessible to the broad community of users, however, and programmers sometimes regard TEI XML as over-complex and hard to process.

What We’ll Do

The goal of the hackathon is to make significant progress on a few projects during one day of work (from 9am to roughly 5.30pm). Read the rest of this entry »

Postdoc in digital history at Washington & Lee

March 11th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Rebecca Benefiel:

Mellon Junior Faculty Fellow in Digital History

Washington and Lee University invites applications for a Mellon Foundation postdoctoral fellowship for recent Ph.D.s in history who intend to pursue careers as teacher-scholars in a liberal arts college setting. These two-year fellowships are open to candidates who earned their Ph.D.s in Spring 2012 or later. Fellows will play an active role in helping to demonstrate innovative methods of teaching, making interdisciplinary connections and teaching new courses in neglected areas of the curriculum. Fellows will have a reduced teaching load to allow time for their own scholarly development.

The Department of History seeks a specialist in digital history with a concentration in ancient or any field in pre-1800 global or non-Western history. Applicants should have experience with digital humanities pedagogies and using digital humanities tools in their scholarly research.

Apply electronically at our portal: https://jobs.wlu.edu/postings/1907. After filling out a cover sheet, you will be prompted to upload a letter of application, a CV, a sample of recent scholarly work, and enter contact information for two providers of letters of recommendation (or a credentials file). Review of applications will begin April 7, 2014. Address your application letter (and any questions) to Professor Sarah Horowitz (horowitzs@wlu.edu), Chair, Mellon Junior Faculty Fellow in Digital History Search Committee, Department of History, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450. Washington and Lee and the Department of History are interested in candidates committed to high standards of scholarship and professional activities, and to the development of a campus climate that supports equality and diversity among its faculty, staff, and students. The University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

March 10th, 2014 by Simon Mahony

We have had requests for a few days’ extension to the deadline for abstracts and consider it only fair to extend that to everyone. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014

See earlier CFP for full details.

Course on Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing

January 24th, 2014 by Tom Elliott

Via an email from Katie Green to the Antiquist list:

Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing
Mon 3 to Tue 4 Mar 2014
Rewley House 1 Wellington Square Oxford OX1 2JA

Through a series of presentations, practical sessions and group discussions, this course will explore the importance of digital preservation for the long term safety of archaeological data and provide practical guidance on how to prepare, curate, deposit and access digital data. The course will also provide guidance on data publishing online and introduce Linked Open Data for archaeology. The course is aimed primarily at archaeology data creators and data curators operating in national agency and local authority heritage environments. However this course will also be of benefit to professionals working in commercial, independent and research environments and to community groups utilising and creating archaeological data. The course will be of particular interest to those who maintain large data sets and need to efficiently manage, effectively preserve and provide access to their data for the future.

More details available here: http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/details.php?id=V400-325&Category=800
If you have any questions about this course, please email professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk.

Part-time, fixed-term IT job in British Museum

January 21st, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

A job ad that might suit a digital classicist or archaeologist with good programming skills (Python, PHP, Java) looking to work part-time, perhaps while studying or freelancing, is being circulated by Dan Pett of the Portable Antiquities Scheme in the British Museum. It may be a sign of the tough climate that a limited contract like this is offered to someone with this kind of expertise and interests, but if it does suit the shape of your life at the moment, the PAS are a great team to work with!

The British Museum is currently recruiting for an ICT Officer in the Britain, Europe and Prehistory Department on a fixed term part-time basis working 3 days per week. The ICT Officer will provide assistance to the ICT Adviser for further development of the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) website and database, with system maintenance and monitoring of data flow. You will ensure data standards are maintained, providing a secondary point of contact for technical enquiries from the general public and PAS staff. You will be fully trained to run the PAS database and will gain experience of managing the PAS ICT infrastructure.

See full job and applications details.

CFP: Making Meaning from Data

January 13th, 2014 by Tom Elliott

Abstracts are invited for the Digital Classics Association colloquium at SCS / AIA Annual Meetings in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 8-11, 2015.

[[ reposted from http://apaclassics.org/annual-meeting/146/cfp-making-meaning-data ]]

Sponsored by the Digital Classics Association
Organizers: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri Kansas-City

Digital techniques hold the promise of providing a consistent and comprehensive basis for the interpretation of classical culture, yet they also raise significant questions of method. Do digital approaches lead us away from certain kinds of interpretation and toward others? How does the quantitative and aggregate nature of argumentation common to digital humanities relate to other modes of understanding the ancient world? Papers are invited for this session that reflect theoretically on the study and understanding of classical antiquity in light of the growing importance of digital methods. Participants may take as their object material any aspect of classical culture, including, but not limited to: history, language, literature, material and visual culture, and philosophy.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously by three readers in accordance with APA regulations. In your email, please confirm that you are an APA member in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the APA website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 5 p.m. Eastern Time, February 3, 2014.

Contact: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY, ncoffee@buffalo.edu

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 28-May 1, 2014

January 13th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, London, April 28-May 1, 2014. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday February 21st, 2014.

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

January 6th, 2014 by Simon Mahony

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014. (Note new deadline.)

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: www.digitalclassicist.org/wip

Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series (LOFTS)

December 16th, 2013 by Greta Franzini

The Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig is pleased to announce a new effort within the Open Philology Project: the Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series (LOFTS).

The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series is a new effort to establish open editions of ancient works that survive only through quotations and text re-uses in later texts (i.e., those pieces of information that humanists call “fragments”).

As a first step in this process, the Humboldt Chair announces the Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG) Project, whose goal is to produce a digital edition of the five volumes of Karl Müller’s Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (FHG) (1841-1870), which is the first big collection of fragments of Greek historians ever realized.

For further information, please visit the project website at: http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/open-philology-project/the-leipzig-open-fragmentary-texts-series-lofts/

Volunteers with excellent Latin sought

December 8th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

Ostrakon from Bu Njem

A few volunteers have started gathering for an interesting project, and it occurs to me that others may like to join us. This might be especially appropriate to someone with excellent Latin, a love for the subject, but no current involvement with the classics, and some spare time on their hands. A retired Latin teacher might fit the bill, or someone who completed an advanced classics degree some years ago, but now works in an unrelated field and misses working with ancient texts. Current students and scholars are also more than welcome to participate.

The Papyri.info site includes some 52,000 transcribed texts, of which about 2,000 in Latin, very few translated into English or any other modern language. The collaborative editing tool SoSOL (deployed at papyri.info/editor) allows users to add to or improve existing editions of papyrological texts, for example by adding new translations.

If you think you might like to take part in this exercise, take a look for instance at O. Bu Njem, a corpus of 150 ostraka from the Roman military base at Golas in Libya. The Latin texts (often fragmentary) are already transcribed; do you think you could produce an English translation of a few of these texts, which will be credited to you? Would you like a brief introduction to the SoSOL interface to enable you to add the translations yourself (pending approval by the editorial board)?

Publishing Text for a Digital Age

December 6th, 2013 by Greta Franzini

March 27-30, 2014
Tufts University
Medford MA
perseus_neh (at) tufts.edu
http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/2014-workshop/

Call for contributions!

As a follow-on to Working with Text in a Digital Age, an NEH-funded Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities and in collaboration with the Open Philology Project at the University of Leipzig, Tufts University announces a two-day workshop on publishing textual data that is available under an open license, that is structured for machine analysis as well as human inspection, and that is in a format that can be preserved over time. The purpose of this workshop is to establish specific guidelines for digital publications that publish and/or annotate textual sources from the human record. The registration for the workshop will be free but space will be limited. Some support for travel and expenses will be available. We particularly encourage contributions from students and early-career researchers.

Textual data can include digital versions of traditional critical editions and translations but such data also includes annotations that make traditional tasks (such as looking up or quoting a primary source) machine-actionable, annotations that may build upon print antecedents (e.g., dynamic indexes of places that can be used to generate maps and geospatial visualizations), and annotations that are only feasible in a digital space (such as alignments between source text and translation or exhaustive markup of morphology, syntax, and other linguistic features).

Contributions can be of two kinds:

  1. Collections of textual data that conform to existing guidelines listed below. These collections must include a narrative description of their contents, how they were produced and what audiences and purposes they were designed to serve.
  2. Contributions about formats for publication. These contributions must contain sufficient data to illustrate their advantages and to allow third parties to develop new materials.

All textual data must be submitted under a Creative Commons license. Where documents reflect a particular point of view by a particular author and where the original expression should for that reason not be changed, they may be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All other contributions must be distributed under a CC-BY-SA license. Most publications may contain data represented under both categories: the introduction to an edition or a data set, reflecting the reasons why one or more authors made a particular set of decisions, can be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All data sets (such as geospatial annotation, morphosyntactic analyses, reconstructed texts with textual notes, diplomatic editions, translations) should be published under a CC-BY-SA license.

Contributors should submit abstracts of up to 500 words to EasyChair. We particularly welcome abstracts that describe data already available under a Creative Commons license. 

Dates:

January 1, 2014:  Submissions are due. Please submit via EasyChair.

January 20, 2014:  Notification.

DCSB 2013/2014: programme now online

October 7th, 2013 by mromanello

We are glad to announce to the community that this year’s #DigiClass Berlin seminar programme has now been published:

All seminars will be video recorded and the videos, as well as the slides, will be available from the programme page.

Digital Humanities in new lecture series on history and pubs

August 21st, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

A new lecture series on history of beer/wine/pubs is starting in London, and the inaugural paper, 18:00 on August 28th,  is from Digital Humanities scholar Harvey Quamen explaining why databases, prosopography and digital mapping are useful for the scholar of the history of brewing (an argument that can of course be extended to all modern history, and for that matter ancient). From the original announcement:

Three major questions—all difficult to answer—prompt this talk:

  1. what caused the sudden demise of porter around 1820?
  2. how did the style called India Pale Ale spread so rapidly?
  3. can we locate the historical London breweries?

Although surrounded in some mystery, these questions might be answerable using some techniques from the digital humanities. In particular, building a database of historical recipes will help us understand the movement and growth of beer styles (especially as those styles moved through homebrewing) and we can begin to track master-apprenticeship relationships with the use of propopographies, databases that serve as “collective biographies” of groups of people. Finally, using historical maps (like the Agas map digitized at the Map of Early Modern London project), we might begin to reconstruct the historical distribution of beer around the capital.

The series will focus on archaeology and history, so more future papers may be of more direct interest to the #DigiClass community too.

Postdoc Research Fellowship in Trier, Germany

August 21st, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

Seems like two out of three jobs we see advertized in Digital Humanities these days are in Germany (even not counting the recent mass recruitment at Greg Crane’s new shop in Leipzig!), which is both great news for everyone in this field, and a little bit sobering for those us seeing many of our best students and colleagues heading off that way.

The latest announcement comes from Trier (via Laura Löser on the MARKUP list), of a one year DH postdoctoral position at the Kompetenzzentrum there. See http://kompetenzzentrum.uni-trier.de/files/6713/7596/2062/Ausschreibung_Postdoktorandenstipendium.pdf for the full details. Note the closing date is in about three weeks time.

Digital Classicist London Videocasts

August 16th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

The videocasts for all the 2013 Digital Classicist London summer seminars are now available online at the Seminar Programme page. Each presentation is available as a downloadable or streamable video (MP4), or, for those who prefer audio, as MP3. Slideshows have also been made available in PDF format, although these are generally included in the video as well. Users can receive updates to the series, including videos from the London, Berlin, and occasional other seminars, by subscribing to the Seminar RSS Feed, or following @Stoaorg on Twitter.

Many thanks to our excellent videographer Wilma Stefani for filming and editing the videos, and to all our speakers for permission to share their presentations and slides.

(Thanks also to Christina Kamposiori, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale who helped with the organization and management of the seminars every week.)

Getty Joins Open Content Movement

August 15th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

The Getty Museum and research institute have just announced the launch of their Open Content Program, under which they intend to publish as many of their digital resources as they are legally able. In the first instance, they are release high quality digital images of all the public domain works in their collections: 4,600 photographs so far, including a few hundred of their classical sculptures, vases, and other artefacts. (A search for “Greek” within the open content images returns 261 results, and “Roman” 231.)

There is no specific common license attached to these images, but the text says they are re-usable “for any purpose” and without restriction; the objects are in the public domain, and the Getty does not assert copyright on the photographs. (I’ve only found a small number of photographs of inscriptions so far, but I’ll keep hunting!) And I very much hope many more images get added to this collection as the copyright status of further objects is resolved.

I look forward to hearing about innovative, open, and unrestricted projects, mashups, and publications that arise from this.

Last call for abstracts: Leipzig eHumanities seminar

August 8th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

Read the rest of this entry »

EpiDoc Latest Release (8.17)

August 8th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Scott Vanderbilt has just announced the latest release of the EpiDoc Guidelines, Schema, and Example Stylesheets.

Details are available on the Latest Release page of the EpiDoc wiki at SourceForge.

Digital Humanities conferences, 1989-2013

July 17th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

It’s recently been announced that the DH conference in 2015 will be held at the University of Sydney, the first time it has ever been held outside the axis of North America and northern Europe. It’s been as far south as Tempe Arizona and as far east as Oulu, Finland; I’ve plotted this little Google Map to show the distribution, which is simultaneously impressive within its borders, and staggeringly insular from a global perspective.


View DH footprint in a larger map

I hope this means that in 2015 we’ll see more South- and East- Asian and southern African as well as antipodean scholars able to attend the conference for the first time. In the name of ADHO’s current policies of greater inclusiveness, I applaud this extension of our borders.

Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

July 11th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

Job: lecturer in Digital Humanities, Leuven

June 22nd, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

A full-time, tenure-track, academic post (research and teaching) in the digital humanities has been advertised at KU Leuven. From the jobsite:

We are looking for a candidate with a PhD in one of the Arts Faculty’s fields of cultural scholarship (history, literature, fine arts, musicology, archaeology, area studies) or in Digital Humanities and whose research shows substantial expertise in the application of digital techniques.. The candidate is expected to further develop a prominent profile in the interdisciplinary field of Digital Humanities. The research focus must be methodological, with an emphasis on data-analysis and the visualisation of large corpora using qualitative methods and meaning investigation. The candidate actively keeps up with international developments in digital media and technologies. The candidate is required to apply for research funding in the area of Digital Humanities, notably but not exclusively in the Horizon 2020 framework, in cooperation with diverse research units in the Arts Faculty. The candidate is expected to publish in internationally recognised Digital Humanities journals as first author, and to contribute to mainstream journals in various Arts Faculty disciplines as co-author.

Full details and instructions for applying at: https://icts.kuleuven.be/apps/jobsite/vacatures/52493650?lang=en