Humanités numériques: l’exemple de l’Antiquité (Grenoble, Sept 2-4, 2015)

November 28th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

(Version française dessous)

The University ‘Stendhal’ of Grenoble 3, the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme-Alpes, L’Université Grenoble 2, the Humboldt Chair for Digital Humanities and HISOMA  organise the conference “Digital Humanities: the example of Antiquity”. The conference will take place in Grenoble, from the 2nd to the 4th of September 2015.

The goal of this conference is twofold: at the same time an assessment of existing methodologies and a looking forward to new ones. It also has the objective of evaluating current practices of the application of Digital Humanities to the study of antiquity, practices which are quite numerous but also sometimes disconnected from each other and without an overall understanding. The conference also aims to contribute toward the design of new projects and the opening new paths, by establishing a dialogue between scholars for whom the Digital Humanities are already familiar and those wishing to acquire knowledge and practice in this domain.
Read the rest of this entry »

Round table: Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts

November 27th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts
a round table discussion
Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Daniel Pett (British Museum), Humphrey Southall (Portsmouth), Charlotte Tupman (KCL); with response by Eleanor Robson (UCL)

18:00, Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS

As classicists and ancient historians have become increasingly reliant on large online research tools over recent years, it has become ever more imperative to find ways of integrating those tools. Linked Open Data (LOD) has the potential to leverage both the connectivity, accessibility and universal standards of the Web, and the power, structure and semantics of relational data. This potential is being used by several scholars and projects in the area of ancient world and historical studies. The SNAP:DRGN project (snapdrgn.net) is using LOD to bring together many technically varied databases and authorities lists of ancient persons into a single virtual authority file; the Pleiades gazetteer and service projects such as Pelagios and PastPlace are creating open vocabularies for historical places and networks of references to them. Museums and other heritage institutions are at the forefront of work to encode semantic archaeological and material culture data, and projects such as Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (ancientwisdoms.ac.uk) and the Homer Multitext (homermultitext.org) are developing citation protocols and an ontology for relating texts with variants, translations and influences.

The panel will introduce some of these key projects and concepts, and then the audience will be invited to participate in open discussion of the issues and potentials of Linked Ancient World Data.

Conference: Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations of History (Gothenburg, March 19-21 2015)

October 24th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Reposted from Critical Heritage Studies blog (thanks to Anna Foka):

March 19-21 2015, Gothenburg. Deadline for abstracts November 20, 2014

Full call here

A Critical Approach to Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations for History and Culture.

A conference for scholars and practitioners who study the implementation and potential of visual and multi-sensory representations to challenge and diversify our common understanding of history and culture.

Abstracts for research papers, posters, visual and multi-sensory demonstrations of ongoing projects, workshops, panels, and organised sessions on the conference themes will be accepted until November 20, 2014.

www.challengethepast.com

challengethepast@gu.se

Supporting partners:
Critical Heritage Studies (University of Gothenburg) //  HUMlab (Umeå University) // Visual Arena // Malmö Museer

Petition on software in research

October 16th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Giacomo Peru (EPCC, University of Edinburgh):

As a ‘lapsed classicist’, and on behalf of the Software Sustainability Institute (SSI) at the University of Edinburgh, for whom I now work, I would like if I may to draw your attention to a petition, launched by SSI, which seeks to assert the fundamental importance of software to today’s research:

http://bit.ly/SoftwareIsFundamental

and on Twitter:

I would like to ask a few minutes of your attention to read the petition and, if you agree, to sign it.

Perhaps because software is intangible, we have become accustomed to focussing on only the hardware that makes research possible. But with very few exceptions, every significant advance in research over the last thirty years would have been impossible without software. I would like to see these advances continue, but that won’t happen if the research community overlooks the role of software.

Thank you and best regards.

Stage d’ecdotique. 16-20 février 2015

October 13th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Guillaime Bady:

Chères/chers collègues,
Je vous annonce que le prochain stage d’ecdotique des Sources Chrétiennes aura lieu du 16 au 20 février 2015, avec une initiation à la paléographie le 15 février, et une table-ronde le 19 février, à laquelle je vous invite chaleureusement à participer.

Vous trouverez en pièce jointe l’affiche du stage (le programme n’est pas encore disponible).

Pour une présentation du stage:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/formation/stage-ecdotique-stage-2015

Formulaire de préinscription:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/webform/preinscription-stage-ecdotique-2015

Appel à contribution pour la Table-ronde:
http://ecdotique.hypotheses.org/544

En espérant que les dates retenues, choisies en fonction des disponibilités des intervenants, seront opportunes, d’avance je vous remercie pour la publicité que vous pourrez faire à cette annonce.

Avec mes plus cordiales salutations,

Guillaume Bady

Chercheur CNRS à HiSoMA-Sources Chrétiennes (UMR 5189)
22 rue Sala
69002 Lyon

CFP: Seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age

October 1st, 2014 by Tom Elliott

The Digital Latin Library, a joint project of the Society for Classical Studies, the Medieval Academy of America, and the Renaissance Society of America, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, announces a seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age. The seminar will take place on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, the DLL’s host institution, on June 25–26, 2015.

We welcome proposals for papers on all subjects related to the intersection of modern technology with traditional methods for editing Latin texts of all eras. Suggested topics:

  • Keeping the “critical” in digital critical editions
  • The scholarly value of editing texts to be read by humans and machines
  • Extending the usability of critical editions beyond a scholarly audience
  • Visualizing the critical apparatus: moving beyond a print-optimized format
  • Encoding different critical approaches to a text
  • Interoperability between critical editions and other digital resources
  • Dreaming big: a wishlist of features for the optimal digital editing environment

Of particular interest are proposals that examine the scholarly element of preparing a digital edition.

The seminar will be limited to ten participants. Participants will receive a stipend, and all travel and related expenses will be paid by the DLL.

Please send proposals of no more than 650 words to Samuel J. Huskey at dll-seminar@ou.edu by December 1, 2014. Notification of proposal status will be sent in early January.

Digital Classicist New England seminar 2015 CFP

September 2nd, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

[original link]

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the third series of the Digital Classicist New England (Boston). This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organized in association with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University. It will run during the spring term of the academic year 2014/15.

We invite submissions on any kind of research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the ancient world. We encourage contributions not only from students of Greco-Roman but also from other areas of the pre-modern world, such as Egypt and the Near East, Ancient China and India.

Themes may include digital editions, natural language processing, image processing and visualisation, linked data and the semantic web, open access, spatial and network analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. We welcome seminar proposals addressing the application of these methods to individual projects, and particularly contributions which show how the digital component can facilitate the crossing of disciplinary boundaries and answering new research questions. Seminar content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, as well as to information scientists and digital humanists, with an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of these fields.

Anonymised abstracts [1] of 500 words max. (bibliographic references excluded) should be uploaded by midnight (CET) on 01 November 2014 using the special submission form. When submitting the same proposal for consideration to multiple venues, please do let us know via the submission form (to be posted later).

Seminars will run from mid-January through April 2015 and will be hosted at Brandeis, Holy Cross, Northeastern and Tufts. The full programme, including the venue of each seminar, will be finalised and announced in December. In order to facilitate real-time participation from California to Europe, seminars will take place in the early afternoon and will be accessible online as Google Hangouts.

As with the previous series, the video recordings of the presentations will be published online and we endeavour to provide accommodation for the speakers and contribute towards their travel expenses. There are plans to publish papers selected from the first series of the seminar as a special issue in an appropriate open access journal.

[1] The anonymized abstract should have all author names, institutions and references to the authors work removed. This may lead to some references having to be replaced by “Reference to authors’ work”. The abstract title and author names with affiliations are entered into the submission system in separate fields.

Organizing committee:

Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University
Gregory Crane, Tufts and Leipzig
Stella Dee, University of Leipzig
Leonard Muellner, Brandeis University
Maxim Romanov, Tufts University
David A. Smith, Northeastern University
David Neel Smith, College of the Holy Cross

Funded PhD, spacial technology and NE Archaeology, FH Mainz

August 12th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

The following funded PhD studentship has been advertised at the Institute for Spatial Information and Surveying Technology at the University of Applied Sciences Mainz (Technik FH Mainz).

The position is funded by the DFG/ANR project TEXTE LSEM (2014 – 2017) investigating the application of Semantic Web and related technologies to support archaeological and philological research in reconstructing the historic geography of Mesopotamia in the 2nd mill. BC.
[...]
Your primary field of work will be the exploration and application of semantically modelling archaeological site information and webbased visualisation solutions, investigating the potential of querying distributed information systems for integrating philological and archaeological knowledge. The project involves European universities from France and Germany (Paris, Dijon, Berlin, Munich, Mainz).

Full details: http://bit.ly/textelsem

Suda On Line milestone

August 8th, 2014 by Bill Hutton

Thanks to Simon Mahony for posting an excerpt of this announcement previously sent to contributors and registered guests of SOL.   Below is a version of the full announcement tailored for the stoa.org audience.   Many people who contribute to and read this site have made important contributions to SOL’s database and infrastructure over the years, and we thank you wholeheartedly for helping us reach this point.   Quick facts: home page is http://www.stoa.org/sol; and to find out about participating in SOL’s future, please contact the managing editors at sudatores@lsv.uky.edu.   Here comes the announcement:

The Managing Editors of the Suda On Line are pleased to announce that a translation of the last of the >31,000 entries in the Suda was recently submitted to the SOL database and vetted.   This means that the first English translation of the entire Suda lexicon (a vitally important source for Classical and Byzantine studies), as well as the first continuous commentary on the Suda’s contents in any language, is now searchable and browsable through our on-line database (http://www.stoa.org/sol).

Conceived in 1998, the SOL was one of the first new projects that Ross Scaife brought under the aegis of the Stoa Consortium.  Ross also took the lead in turning the inchoate ideas of the project’s originators into a workable digital reality, oversaw the project’s technical development along with Raphael Finkel, and served as one of the Managing Editors until his untimely passing in 2008. After sixteen years, SOL remains, as it was when it began, a unique paradigm of digital scholarly collaboration, demonstrating the potential of new technical and editorial methods of organizing, evaluating and disseminating scholarship.   The current Managing Editors hope that the SOL will stand as a lasting tribute to Ross’s visionary leadership.    From the beginning the SOL has also benefitted from the cooperation and support of the TLG and the Perseus Digital Library.

To see a brief history of the project, go to http://www.stoa.org/sol/history.shtml, and for further background see Anne Mahoney’s article in Digital Humanities Quarterly (http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/003/1/000025/000025.html). The SOL has already proved to be a catalyst for new scholarship on the Suda, including the identification – as possible, probable, or certain – of many hundreds more of the Suda’s quotations than previously recognised. To see a list of these identifications, with links to the Suda entries in question, please visit http://www.stoa.org/sol/TLG.shtml.

Although all the entries are translated, our work is not done. One of the principles of SOL is that there will never be any limit to the improvement of our database.   From here on our editors will be scrutinizing every entry for opportunities to introduce improvements to the translations, additions to the annotations, updates to the associated bibliography, and so on.

We also invite the participation of qualified scholars who can contribute their expertise toward the betterment of SOL.  If you are interested in working on the project, please visit our home page and follow the appropriate link to submit an on-line application to be registered as an editor.   Normally our editors are scholars who possess professional credentials in Classical or Byzantine Studies or in other fields relating to the content of the Suda, but we consider all applications.

If you are already registered as an editor for SOL, and want to get back to work on it after a long layoff, feel free to contact the Managing Editors if you need help getting started (sudatores@lsv.uky.edu).  Also, those who have registered before as translators or guests may submit a request to the Managing Editors to have their status changed to that of editor.

 

The Managing Editors (David Whitehead, Raphael Finkel, William Hutton, Catharine Roth, Patrick Rourke, Elizabeth Vandiver)

Postdoc: Hero’s Automata (Glasgow)

August 7th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Ian Ruffell.

(The post can be found on the University of Glasgow website via the search page here (search on the College of Arts): http://www.gla.ac.uk/about/jobs/vacancies/. Some more details about the project are here: http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/humanities/research/classicsresearch/researchprojects/heroandhisautomata/.)

Research Associate
Reference Number 009086
Closing date: August 24, 2014
Location Gilmorehill Campus / Main Building
College / Service COLLEGE OF ARTS
Department SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES
Job Family Research And Teaching
Position Type Full Time
Salary Range £32,590 – £36,661

Job Purpose

This post is part of the project ‘Hero of Alexandria and his Theatrical Automata’, funded by the Leverhulme Trust (PI: Dr Ian Ruffell, School of Humanities; Co-I Dr Euan McGookin, School of Engineering). Based in the University of Glasgow (Classics, School of Humanities), the project runs from 1 October 2014 to 30 September 2017. The project investigates Hero of Alexandria’s treatise on the making of automata, and will design, build andthe models described in that work. The post is full-time and available for 36 months from October 1, 2014. The post holder will prototype, build and test versions of the automata, working in collaboration with the rest of the project team in technical analysis of the text. The successful candidate will i) use 3D-modelling (training will be provided) and rapid prototyping equipment to explore possible designs of the automata, ii) with the aid of technicians in the School of Engineering, build full-scale working models of the automata; iii) combine practical data with textual and contextual elements in the project website, iv) test the scope and limitations of the models in performance in dialogue with practitioners and audiences. Read the rest of this entry »

Suda On Line milestone reached

July 31st, 2014 by Simon Mahony

The Suda On Line: Byzantine Lexicography affectionately known as SOL and one of Ross Scaife’s (et al) host of innovative projects has now reached the amazing milestone of 100% translation coverage.

A translation of the last of the Suda’s 31000+ entries was submitted to the database on July 21, 2014 and vetted the next day. This milestone is very gratifying, but the work of the project is far from over. As mentioned above, one of the founding principles of the project is that the process of improving and annotating our translations will go on indefinitely. Much important work remains to be done. We are also constantly thinking of ways to improve SOL’s infrastructure and to add new tools and features. If you are interested in helping us with the continuing betterment of SOL, please read about how you can register as an editor and/or contact the managing editors. (http://www.stoa.org/sol/history.shtml)

Although never involved in this project myself, I often use SOL as an example and case study in my teaching. With much discussion nowadays about so-called ‘crowdsourcing’ and ‘community-sourcing’ this is surely the forerunner.

Job: XML db developer for EpiDoc project

July 30th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Exciting job opportunity for someone with experience in XML databases and EpiDoc projects (part-time, fixed-term, at Oxford but remote working an option):

Part-time XML Research Database Developer
Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles, Oxford
Grade 7: £29,837 – £36,661 p.a. (pro rata)

https://www.recruit.ox.ac.uk/pls/hrisliverecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=114327

The Faculty of Classics seeks to appoint a part-time XML Research Database Developer. This is fixed-term for 12 months. We are looking for a highly motivated individual with a strong interest in Digital Humanities and classical text-editing to build an XML Database backed website for publication, analysis, and editing of EpiDoc TEI P5 XML documents for the I.Sicily project (0.4 FTE) and for the Ptolemaic Egypt project (0.1 FTE).
*We are happy to consider applications from those who would wish to work remotely.*

The postholder will design and implement a native XML Database application for the online publication, analysis, and editing of EpiDoc XML based on open source components; create a testing mechanism for the technical infrastructure for resilient deployment (and redeployment from backup) of the website; develop and maintain the project’s technical infrastructure including XML Database installation and basic Linux server systems administration; and work closely with the IT Consultant and project PI in strategically designing and developing the infrastructure to ensure both reliable behaviour and potential for future expansion of the project.
Read the rest of this entry »

Reflecting on our (first ever) Digital Classicist Wiki Sprint

July 16th, 2014 by Anna Foka

From (Print) Encyclopedia to (Digital) Wiki

According to Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d’Alembert the purpose of an encyclopedia in the 18th century was ‘to collect knowledge disseminated around the globe; to set forth its general system to the people with whom we live, and transmit it to those who will come after us, so that the work of preceding centuries will not become useless to the centuries to come’.  Encyclopedias have existed for around 2,000 years; the oldest is in fact a classical text, Naturalis Historia, written ca 77 CE by Pliny the Elder.

Following the (recent) digitalization of raw data, new, digital forms of encyclopedia have emerged. In our very own, digital era, a Wiki is a wider, electronic encyclopedia that is open to contributions and edits by interesting parties. It contains concept analyses, images, media, and so on, and it is freely available, thus making the creation, recording, and dissemination of knowledge a democratised process, open to everyone who wishes to contribute.

 

A Sprint for Digital Classicists

For us, Digital Classicists, scholars and students interested in the application of humanities computing to research in the ancient and Byzantine worlds, the Digital Classicist Wiki is composed and edited by a hub for scholars and students. This wiki collects guidelines and suggestions of major technical issues, and catalogues digital projects and tools of relevance to classicists. The wiki also lists events, bibliographies and publications (print and electronic), and other developments in the field. A discussion group serves as grist for a list of FAQs. As members of the community provide answers and other suggestions, some of these may evolve into independent wiki articles providing work-in-progress guidelines and reports. The scope of the Wiki follows the interests and expertise of collaborators, in general, and of the editors, in particular. The Digital Classicist is hosted by the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London, and the Stoa Consortium, University of Kentucky.

So how did we end up editing this massive piece of work? On Tuesday July 1, 2014 and around 16:00 GMT (or 17:00 CET) a group of interested parties gathered up in several digital platforms. The idea was that most of the action will take place in the DigiClass chatroom on IRC, our very own channel called #digiclass. Alongside the traditional chat window, there was also a Skype voice call to get us started and discuss approaches before editing. On the side, we had a GoogleDoc where people simultaneously added what they thought should be improved or created. I was very excited to interact with old members and new. It was a fun break during my mini trip to the Netherlands, and as it proved, very focused on the general attitude of the Digital Classicists team; knowledge is open to everyone who wishes to learn and can be the outcome of a joyful collaborative process.

 

The Technology Factor

As a researcher of digital history, and I suppose most information system scholars would agree, technology is never neutral in the process of ‘making’. The magic of the Wiki consists on the fact that it is a rather simple platform that can be easily tweaked. All users were invited to edit any page to create new pages within the wiki Web site, using only a regular web browser without any extra add-ons. Wiki makes page link creation easy by showing whether an intended target page exists or not. A wiki enables communities to write documents collaboratively, using a simple markup language and a web browser. A single page in a wiki website is referred to as a wiki page, while the entire collection of pages, which are usually well interconnected by hyperlinks, is ‘the wiki’. A wiki is essentially a database for creating, browsing, and searching through information. A wiki allows non-linear, evolving, complex and networked text, argument and interaction. Edits can be made in real time and appear almost instantly online. This can facilitate abuse of the system. Private wiki servers (such as the Digital Classicist one) require user identification to edit pages, thus making the process somewhat mildly controlled. Most importantly, as researchers of the digital we understood in practice that a wiki is not a carefully crafted site for casual visitors. Instead, it seeks to involve the visitor in an ongoing process of creation and collaboration that constantly changes the Web site landscape.

 

Where Technology Shapes the Future of Humanities

In terms of Human resources some with little involvement in the Digital Classicist community before this, got themselves involved in several tasks including correcting pages, suggesting new projects, adding pages to the wiki, helping others with information and background, approaching project-owners and leaders in order to suggest adding or improving information. Collaboration, a practice usually reserved for science scholars, made the process easier and intellectually stimulating.  Moreover, within these overt cyber-spaces of ubiquitous interaction one could identify a strong sense of productive diversity within our own scholarly community; it was visible both in the IRC chat channel as well as over skype. Several different accents and spellings, British, American English, and several continental scholars were gathering up to expand this incredibly fast-pacing process. There was a need to address research projects, categories, and tools found in non-english speaking academic cultures.  As a consequence of this multivocal procedure, more interesting questions arose, not lest methodological. ‘What projects are defined as digital, really’, ‘Isn’t everything a database?’ ‘What is a prototype?’. ‘Shouldn’t there be a special category for dissertations, or visualisations?’.  The beauty of collaboration in all its glory, plus expanding our horizons with technology! And so much fun!

MediaWiki recorded almost 250 changes made in the 1st of July 2014!

The best news, however is that this, first ever wiki sprint was not the last.  In the words of the Organisers, Gabriel Boddard and Simon Mahony,

‘We have recently started a programme of short intensive work-sprints to
improve the content of the Digital Classicist Wiki
(http://wiki.digitalclassicist.org/). A small group of us this week made
about 250 edits in a couple of hours in the afternoon, and added dozens
of new projects, tools, and other information pages.

We would like to invite other members of the Digital Classicist community to
join us for future “sprints” of this kind, which will be held on the
first Tuesday of every month, at 16h00 London time (usually =17:00
Central Europe; =11:00 Eastern US).

To take part in a sprint:

1. Join us in the DigiClass chatroom (instructions at
<http://wiki.digitalclassicist.org/DigiClass_IRC_Channel>) during the
scheduled slot, and we’ll decide what to do there;

2. You will need an account on the Wiki–if you don’t already have one,
please email one of the admins to be invited;

3. You do not need to have taken part before, or to come along every
month; occasional contributors are most welcome!’

The next few sprints are scheduled for:
* August 5th
* September 2nd
* October 7th
* November 4th
* December 2nd

Please, do join us, whenever you can!

 

 

CfP: Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2014/2015

June 16th, 2014 by mromanello

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the third series of the Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin. This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organised in association with the German Archaeological Institute and the Excellence Cluster TOPOI. It will run during the winter term of the academic year 2014/15.

We invite submissions on any kind of research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the ancient world. We encourage contributions not only from Classics but also from the entire field of “Altertumswissenschaften”, to include the ancient world at large, such as Egypt and the Near East.

Themes may include digital editions, natural language processing, image processing and visualisation, linked data and the semantic web, open access, spatial and network analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. We welcome seminar proposals addressing the application of these methods to individual projects, and particularly contributions which show how the digital component can facilitate the crossing of disciplinary boundaries and answering new research questions. Seminar content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, as well as to information scientists and digital humanists, with an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of these fields.

Anonymised abstracts [1] of 300-500 words max. (bibliographic references excluded) should be uploaded by midnight (CET) on 01 August 2014 using the special submission form. Although we do accept abstracts written in English as well as in German, the presentations are expected to be delivered in English. When submitting the same proposal for consideration to multiple venues, please do let us know via the submission form. The acceptance rate for the first two seminar series was of 41% (2012/13) and 31% (2014/15).

Seminars will run fortnightly on Tuesday evenings (18:00-19:30) from October 2014 until February 2015 and will be hosted by the Excellence Cluster TOPOI and the German Archaeological Institute, both located in Berlin-Dahlem. The full programme, including the venue of each seminar, will be finalised and announced in September. As with the previous series, the video recordings of the presentations will be published online and we endeavour to provide accommodation for the speakers and contribute towards their travel expenses. There are plans to publish papers selected from the first three series of the seminar as a special issue of the new open access publication from TOPOI.

[1] The anonymised abstract should have all author names, institutions and references to the authors work removed. This may lead to some references having to be replaced by “Reference to authors’ work”. The abstract title and author names with affiliations are entered into the submission system in separate fields.

Web/Database Job at UPenn Museum

May 23rd, 2014 by Sebastian Heath

[Note: I have no official connection to this posting but can vouch for C. Brian Rose as a great person to work with. -Sebastian]

GORDION DATABASE AND WEB DEVELOPER

 

“The Gordion Database and Web Developer is a one-year term position with the possibility of renewal that reports to the Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section and is responsible for the design and implementation of the Gordion Project’s digital resources. These include the back-end database which uses open-source software and the public website housed at http://sites.museum.upenn.edu/gordion/. The Gordion Project in central Turkey has been active since the 1950s and has collected a substantial and growing archive of paper-based and digital information. A significant portion of this archive has been digitized and is available in a content management system. This material is currently used by researchers working to publish the excavation’s results. The project is also committed to sharing this data via its website. The Gordion Database and Web Developer will work with the Gordion Project Archivist to facilitate both internal use and public access. The Gordion Database and Web Developer will also be responsible for database development for ongoing field research in Gordion. Participation in fieldwork at Gordion is also desirable.”

Full posting: https://jobs.hr.upenn.edu/postings/4014

Editing Texts and Digital Libraries: 2 seminars in Leipzig

May 15th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Greta Franzini:

Next week the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities is hosting two seminars as part of its Digital Philology course:

1) Monday May 19th, 3:15-4:45pm, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“Editing Texts in Context: Two Case Studies” by Rebecca Finnigan, Christine Bannan and Prof. Neel D. Smith, College of the Holy Cross

2) Tuesday May 20th, 9:15-10:45am, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“digilibLT – a Digital Library of Late Latin Texts” by Prof. Maurizio Lana, Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)

For more information, please visit http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/news-announcements/

SNAP:DRGN introduction

May 8th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopography: Data and Relations in Greco-roman Names (SNAP:DRGN) is a one-year pilot project, based at King’s College London in collaboration with colleagues from the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (Oxford), Trismegistos (Leuven), Papyri.info (Duke) and Pelagios (Southampton), and hopes to include many more data partners by the end of this first year. Much of the early discussion of this project took place at the LAWDI school in 2013. Our goal is to recommend standards for sharing relatively minimalist data about classical and other ancient prosopographical and onomastic datasets in RDF, thereby creating a huge graph of person-data that scholars can:

  1. query to find individuals, patterns, relationships, statistics and other information;
  2. follow back to the richer and fuller source information in the contributing database;
  3. contribute new datasets or individual persons, names and textual references/attestations;
  4. annotate to declare identity between persons (or co-reference groups) in different source datasets;
  5. annotate to express other relationships between persons/entities in different or the same source dataset (such as familial relationships, legal encounters, etc.)
  6. use URIs to annotate texts and other references to names with the identity of the person to whom they refer (similar to Pelagios’s model for places using Pleiades).

More detailed description (plus successful funding bid document, if you’re really keen) can be found at <http://snapdrgn.net/about>.

Our April workshop invited a handful of representative data-holders and experts in prosopography and/or linked open data to spend two days in London discussing the SNAP:DRGN project, their own data and work, and approaches to sharing and linking prosopographical data in general. We presented a first draft of the SNAP:DRGN “Cookbook”, the guidelines for formatting a subset of prosopographical data in RDF for contribution to the SNAP graph, and received some extremely useful feedback on individual technical issues and the overall approach. A summary of the workshop, and slides from many of the presentations, can be found at <http://snapdrgn.net/archives/110>.

In the coming weeks we shall announce the first public version of the SNAP ontology, the Cookbook, and the graph of our core and partner datasets and annotations. For further discussion about the project, and linked data for prosopography in general, you can also join the Ancient-People Googlegroup (where I posted a summary similar to this post earlier today).

Ontologies for Prosopography: workshop at DH 2014, Lausanne (July 8)

April 10th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Humanities 2014: Workshop
Lausanne, Switzerland
8th July, 2014

To register, go to the Digital Humanities 2014 website.

Ontologies for Prosopography: Who’s Who? or, Who was Who?

Linked data has become an increasingly popular fixture in digital humanities research because it offers a way to break out of the data silos that are constantly being created, and provides a framework for new ways of approaching research questions. Tim Berners-Lee’s four principles of linked data, however, remind us that global identifiers for entities – URIs – provide only a part of what is needed if linked data is to fulfil its promise.  As much as possible, we also need common semantic frameworks to better tie the data together – what are called “ontologies”.

In a seminal paper way back in 1993 Thomas Gruber defined an ontology as an “explicit specification of a shared conceptualisation”. We will be focusing on possibilities for an ontology for prosopography because, for historical data at least, people, places and textual sources are likely to be the three pillars upon which a structure of linked data can be constructed, and these three things are likely to be the primary entry point for a collection of linked historical data. While methodologies for dealing with textual sources are being continually refined, the success of the Pelagios project has demonstrated how historical geographic information, in this case classical, can be used to bring together a wide variety of projects. This workshop will address the issues of bringing linked data to the description of historical persons with the morning session devoted to exploring the question of whether there are sufficient common concepts – a shared conceptualisation – to enable for the practical and useful development of an ontology for historical persons, and the afternoon addressing the challenges of linking these descriptions together to create a shared resource.

Read the rest of this entry »

BICS Supplement 122: THE DIGITAL CLASSICIST 2013

April 7th, 2014 by Simon Mahony

We are very pleased to announce the publication of the latest Digital Classicist volume, The Digital Classicist 2013, published by the Institute of Classical Studies, London as part of their BICS series.

SUPP-122-flyer_Page_1_Image_0001
This edited volume collects together peer-reviewed papers that initially emanated from presentations at Digital Classicist seminars and conference panels.

For full details see the publisher’s site and the promotional flyer.

Please ask your library to order a copy.

Digital Classicist London seminars, 2014

April 3rd, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014

Fridays at 16:30 in room G37* Senate House
Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU
* Unless otherwise specified below

June 6* Ségolène Tarte (Oxford), On Cognition and the Digital in the Study of Ancient Textual Artefacts 103 (Holden Room)
June 13* Victoria Moul & Charlotte Tupman (King’s College London), Neo-Latin poetry in English manuscripts, 1550-1700 103 (Holden Room)
June 20 Lorna Richardson (University College London), Public Archaeology in a Digital Age
June 27 Monica Berti, Greta Franzini & Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig), The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects
July 4* Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg), The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data 102 (Athlone Room)
July 11 Silke Vanbeselaere (Leuven), Retracing Theban Witness Networks in Demotic Contracts
July 18* Thibault Clérice (King’s College London), Clotho: Network Analysis and Distant Reading on Perseus Latin Corpus G34
July 25* Marja Vierros (Helsinki), Papyrology and Linguistic Annotation: How can we make TEI EpiDoc XML corpus and Treebanking work together? G35
Aug 1 Sebastian Rahtz (Oxford) & Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relations in Greco-Roman Names (SNAP:DRGN)
Aug 8 Dominic Oldman & Barry Norton (British Museum), A new approach to Digital Editions of Ancient Manuscripts using CIDOC-CRM, FRBRoo and RDFa
Aug 15 Various postgraduate speakers, Short presentations

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk, Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk, S.Mahony@ucl.ac.uk or Charlotte.Tupman@kcl.ac.uk, or see the seminar website at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2014.html

Artistic practice and language learning, Grenoble, Jan 28-30, 2015

March 27th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Call for papers

International symposium, within the context of
ARC 5 – Cultures, Sciences, Sociétés et Médiations
Rhône-Alpes Region (France)
Operation Fabula agitur !

Fabula agitur !
Theatrical and artistic practices, oracy, and the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures
History, Aesthetics, Didactics

Grenoble University (France), January 28-30, 2015

In recent years, specialists in language instruction have paid much attention to the contribution of theatrical practices – and, more broadly speaking, of artistic practices – to the learning of modern languages. This symposium intends to look into a body of work that has so far been neglected: artistic practices used as a way to teach Ancient Languages, whether at school, college, or in local associations, in France and abroad.

For a long time now, however, there have been many examples of such practices. The Educational Theatre of Jesuit colleges, used from the sixteenth century onwards, is one of the most famous examples. Indeed, this type of practice is remarkable because of its wide audience as well as its ‘holistic’ educational approach. Nowadays, Ancient Language teachers may organize Olympiades, tiny drama workshops, unpolished performances or even erudite pageants to provide their pupils with a different approach to Ancient Languages and Cultures. Thanks to the stage, acting and oracy, this approach may be more physical and more emotional than those they are used to encountering in the classroom, in terms of what the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) calls “knowledge”, “skills” and “existential competences” (three macro-categories that apply to each form of learning).

The symposium will be held at Stendhal University – Grenoble III (France) from January 28 to January 30, 2015. Conference participants will be offered short training sessions on Ancient Language theatre as well as two theatrical performances which will clearly display the benefits of artistic practices for the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures.

Communication and workshop proposals should be sent to Malika Bastin-Hammou (Malika.Bastin@u-grenoble3.fr) and Filippo Fonio (Filippo.Fonio@u-grenoble3.fr) before July 01, 2014. They should be written as a presentation, and not exceed 1,500 characters. Scientific committee decisions will be made available on October 01, 2014 at the latest.

Appel à communication-Fabula agitur (PDF: French & English)

TEI Hackathon workshop at DH2014 (July 7)

March 25th, 2014 by Hugh Cayless

Call for Participation

We are inviting applications to participate in the TEI Hackathon full day workshop that will be held on July 7, 2014, as a pre-conference session at DH2014 (http://dh2014.org/).

Digital humanists, librarians, publishers, and many others use the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines to mark up electronic texts, and over time have created a critical mass of XML — some conforming to known subsets of the TEI Guidelines, some to individual customizations; in some cases intricate and dense, in others lean and expedient; some enriched with extensive external  metadata, others with details marked explicitly in the text. The fruits of this labor are most often destined for display online or on paper (!), indexing, and more rarely, visualisation. Techniques of processing this markup beyond display and indexing are less well-understood and not accessible to the broad community of users, however, and programmers sometimes regard TEI XML as over-complex and hard to process.

What We’ll Do

The goal of the hackathon is to make significant progress on a few projects during one day of work (from 9am to roughly 5.30pm). Read the rest of this entry »

Postdoc in digital history at Washington & Lee

March 11th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Rebecca Benefiel:

Mellon Junior Faculty Fellow in Digital History

Washington and Lee University invites applications for a Mellon Foundation postdoctoral fellowship for recent Ph.D.s in history who intend to pursue careers as teacher-scholars in a liberal arts college setting. These two-year fellowships are open to candidates who earned their Ph.D.s in Spring 2012 or later. Fellows will play an active role in helping to demonstrate innovative methods of teaching, making interdisciplinary connections and teaching new courses in neglected areas of the curriculum. Fellows will have a reduced teaching load to allow time for their own scholarly development.

The Department of History seeks a specialist in digital history with a concentration in ancient or any field in pre-1800 global or non-Western history. Applicants should have experience with digital humanities pedagogies and using digital humanities tools in their scholarly research.

Apply electronically at our portal: https://jobs.wlu.edu/postings/1907. After filling out a cover sheet, you will be prompted to upload a letter of application, a CV, a sample of recent scholarly work, and enter contact information for two providers of letters of recommendation (or a credentials file). Review of applications will begin April 7, 2014. Address your application letter (and any questions) to Professor Sarah Horowitz (horowitzs@wlu.edu), Chair, Mellon Junior Faculty Fellow in Digital History Search Committee, Department of History, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450. Washington and Lee and the Department of History are interested in candidates committed to high standards of scholarship and professional activities, and to the development of a campus climate that supports equality and diversity among its faculty, staff, and students. The University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

March 10th, 2014 by Simon Mahony

We have had requests for a few days’ extension to the deadline for abstracts and consider it only fair to extend that to everyone. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014

See earlier CFP for full details.

Course on Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing

January 24th, 2014 by Tom Elliott

Via an email from Katie Green to the Antiquist list:

Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing
Mon 3 to Tue 4 Mar 2014
Rewley House 1 Wellington Square Oxford OX1 2JA

Through a series of presentations, practical sessions and group discussions, this course will explore the importance of digital preservation for the long term safety of archaeological data and provide practical guidance on how to prepare, curate, deposit and access digital data. The course will also provide guidance on data publishing online and introduce Linked Open Data for archaeology. The course is aimed primarily at archaeology data creators and data curators operating in national agency and local authority heritage environments. However this course will also be of benefit to professionals working in commercial, independent and research environments and to community groups utilising and creating archaeological data. The course will be of particular interest to those who maintain large data sets and need to efficiently manage, effectively preserve and provide access to their data for the future.

More details available here: http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/details.php?id=V400-325&Category=800
If you have any questions about this course, please email professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk.