Suggestions for new Greek, Latin texts? English translations?

December 6th, 2012 by gregcrane

[Please repost!]

We are preparing for a new set of texts to be entered by the data entry firm with which we work (http://www.digitaldividedata.org/). The next order will be sent in mid December but a more substantial order will be placed early in 2013.

What would you like to see added to the Perseus Digital Library, both for use within the Perseus site and for download as TEI XML under a Creative Commons license? Note that we only enter materials that are in the public domain and that can be freely redistributed for re-use by others.

Some possibilities — but please suggest other things that you find important!

* Scholia of Greek and Latin authors.

* Collections of fragmentary authors

* Sources from later antiquity (esp. Christian sources)

* More English translations

Please think about (1) individual authors and texts and (2) what you would want to see if we could do something big.

If you have individual suggestions, please write gcrane2008@gmail.com. A public discussion via the Digital Classicist would probably be the best.

Let us know what you want!

6 Responses to “Suggestions for new Greek, Latin texts? English translations?”

  1. Javier Sánchez González Says:

    It would be great to digitalice some authors as St. Columbanus, making more accessible works as Sermons.

  2. Gabe Baker Says:

    Please include literally anything from the Renaissance. Sick of Classical and Christian fathers.

  3. Lisa Cerrato Says:

    Perseus has a small Renaissance Collection: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/collection?collection=Perseus:collection:Renaissance

  4. Rovertos Heller Says:

    So many. Even without the translation just the original would be great. Some I’m surprised are not on there already. Great work with getting more Plutarch up by the way.

    Empedocles William E. Leonard translation with greek

    Aristotle’s Complete works but in particular his ‘On Soul’ and his ‘Physics’

    Plato’s Complete works

    Stobaeus

    Philoponus

    Sextus Empiricus

    Alexander of Aphrodisias

    Simplicius

    Porphyry

    Augustine ‘confessions’

    Justus Lipsius (this one would be of great interest for Stoicism)

    Lots more but these are first choice.

  5. Mark S Says:

    I don’t know if anyone will see this comment since the thread is old, but I second Rovertos’s suggestions. I would also like to see more modern commentaries and other modern works available. In the case of Aristotle, works by Bonitz and Ross would be useful. That might require more work than a simple text dump to be useful though.

    Going beyond text suggestions a bit…

    For those with large screens, it would be great to be able to normally and without extra clicking have the text, translation, and commentary of at least a normal sized page worth of Greek text displayed all at once. And it would be great if clicking on or hovering over a Greek word would take one directly to the LSJ entry for that word. I NEVER want to use Middle Liddell, Slater, or Autenrieth, and for those cases in which Perseus can’t figure out what the headword is, I would be happy if it simply displayed all the possible entries, in order of likeliness. Also, as things stand, Perseus’s version of the LSJ has a big disadvantage compared to the TLG’s since it gives context for far fewer of the citations. (The TLG’s LSJ does this for everything in the TLG, even for people who are not TLG subscribers.) I am not sure what the best way to address this is, but in general, better integration of Perseus and the TLG would be a very good thing. For instance, the TLG now provides links to Perseus translations when they are available, but they are often inaccurate, and part of the problem might be that Perseus is extremely particular about the format it accepts references to classical texts in (a problem that also makes it had to look up a passage in Perseus by typing in a reference one might find in a book or article).

    More usable versions of Smyth and Kuehner-Blass would also be fantastic.

  6. cosmos Says:

    Please see the work of Canadian translator Ian Johnston. Very accessible.

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