Author Archive

CFP: Seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

The Digital Latin Library, a joint project of the Society for Classical Studies, the Medieval Academy of America, and the Renaissance Society of America, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, announces a seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age. The seminar will take place on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, the DLL’s host institution, on June 25–26, 2015.

We welcome proposals for papers on all subjects related to the intersection of modern technology with traditional methods for editing Latin texts of all eras. Suggested topics:

  • Keeping the “critical” in digital critical editions
  • The scholarly value of editing texts to be read by humans and machines
  • Extending the usability of critical editions beyond a scholarly audience
  • Visualizing the critical apparatus: moving beyond a print-optimized format
  • Encoding different critical approaches to a text
  • Interoperability between critical editions and other digital resources
  • Dreaming big: a wishlist of features for the optimal digital editing environment

Of particular interest are proposals that examine the scholarly element of preparing a digital edition.

The seminar will be limited to ten participants. Participants will receive a stipend, and all travel and related expenses will be paid by the DLL.

Please send proposals of no more than 650 words to Samuel J. Huskey at dll-seminar@ou.edu by December 1, 2014. Notification of proposal status will be sent in early January.

Course on Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Via an email from Katie Green to the Antiquist list:

Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing
Mon 3 to Tue 4 Mar 2014
Rewley House 1 Wellington Square Oxford OX1 2JA

Through a series of presentations, practical sessions and group discussions, this course will explore the importance of digital preservation for the long term safety of archaeological data and provide practical guidance on how to prepare, curate, deposit and access digital data. The course will also provide guidance on data publishing online and introduce Linked Open Data for archaeology. The course is aimed primarily at archaeology data creators and data curators operating in national agency and local authority heritage environments. However this course will also be of benefit to professionals working in commercial, independent and research environments and to community groups utilising and creating archaeological data. The course will be of particular interest to those who maintain large data sets and need to efficiently manage, effectively preserve and provide access to their data for the future.

More details available here: http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/details.php?id=V400-325&Category=800
If you have any questions about this course, please email professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk.

CFP: Making Meaning from Data

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Abstracts are invited for the Digital Classics Association colloquium at SCS / AIA Annual Meetings in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 8-11, 2015.

[[ reposted from http://apaclassics.org/annual-meeting/146/cfp-making-meaning-data ]]

Sponsored by the Digital Classics Association
Organizers: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri Kansas-City

Digital techniques hold the promise of providing a consistent and comprehensive basis for the interpretation of classical culture, yet they also raise significant questions of method. Do digital approaches lead us away from certain kinds of interpretation and toward others? How does the quantitative and aggregate nature of argumentation common to digital humanities relate to other modes of understanding the ancient world? Papers are invited for this session that reflect theoretically on the study and understanding of classical antiquity in light of the growing importance of digital methods. Participants may take as their object material any aspect of classical culture, including, but not limited to: history, language, literature, material and visual culture, and philosophy.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously by three readers in accordance with APA regulations. In your email, please confirm that you are an APA member in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the APA website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 5 p.m. Eastern Time, February 3, 2014.

Contact: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY, ncoffee@buffalo.edu

EpiDoc Latest Release (8.17)

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Scott Vanderbilt has just announced the latest release of the EpiDoc Guidelines, Schema, and Example Stylesheets.

Details are available on the Latest Release page of the EpiDoc wiki at SourceForge.

Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

Perseus Catalog Released

Friday, June 21st, 2013

From Lisa Cerrato via the Digital Classicist List:

The Perseus Digital Library is pleased to announce the 1.0 Release of the Perseus Catalog.

The Perseus Catalog is an attempt to provide systematic catalog access to at least one online edition of every major Greek and Latin author (both surviving and fragmentary) from antiquity to 600 CE. Still a work in progress, the catalog currently includes 3,679 individual works (2,522 Greek and 1,247 Latin), with over 11,000 links to online versions of these works (6,419 in Google Books, 5,098 to the Internet Archive, 593 to the Hathi Trust). The Perseus interface now includes links to the Perseus Catalog from the main navigation bar, and also from within the majority of texts in the Greco-Roman collection.

The metadata contained within the catalog has utilized the MODS and MADS standards developed by the Library of Congress as well as the Canonical Text Services and CTS-URN protocols developed by the Homer Multitext Project.  The Perseus catalog interface uses the open source Blacklight Project interface and Apache Solr. Stable, linkable canonical URIs have been provided for all textgroups, works, editions and translations in the Catalog for both HTML and ATOM output formats. The ATOM output format provides access to the source CTS, MODS and MADS metadata for the catalog records. Subsequent releases will make all catalog data available as RDF triples.

Other major plans for the future of the catalog include not only the addition of more authors and works as well as links to online versions but also to open up the catalog to contributions from users. Currently the catalog does not include any user contribution or social features other than standard email contact information but the goal is to soon support the creation of user accounts and the contribution of recommendations, corrections and or new metadata.

The Perseus Catalog blog features documentation, a user guide, and contact information as well as comments from Editor-in-Chief Gregory Crane on the history and purpose of the catalog.

The Perseus Digital Library Team
contact: perseus_catalog@tufts.edu

CFP: Digital Classicist Berlin

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Proposals with abstracts for the winter 2013/2014 Digital Classicst Seminar Berlin are due September 1, 2013. See the full Digital Classicist Berlin call for papers for instructions.

Job at Cologne: Professor of ArchaeoInformatics / Computational archaeology

Thursday, June 13th, 2013

Posted for Michael Heinzelmann:

Professor of ArchaeoInformatics / Computational archaeology (W2)

The Institute of Archaeology of the University of Cologne invites applications for a Full Professorhip in ArchaeoInformatics / computational archaeology (pay grade W2). The starting date for this position is October 1st, 2014.

We seek a distinguished faculty member in the position of a full professor for ArchaeoInformatics / computational archaeology and as director of the Institute’s Digital Archaeology Laboratory. Candidate’s scientific focus is in one or more of the following fields: databases, geographic information systems, CAD-, 3D-Modelling. Relevant experience in usage and development of methods in information technology methods is preconditioned. The archaeological focus should be in Classical / Mediterranean archaeology. The successful candidate will have profound knowledge in research and teaching. Applicants should be internationally recognized for leadership and scholarship in their discipline.

Duties will be to head the Digital Archaeology Laboratory and to provide intellectual and administrative leadership for the Institute of Archaeology and its activities as well as interdisciplinary research and teaching in Classics. Cooperation with regional, national and international research facilities is mandatory.

The position is open to candidates with Ph.D and habilitation or equivalent achievement in  Classical or Mediterranean archaeology.

The University of Cologne is an equal opportunities employer. Preference will be given to suitably qualified women or persons with disabilities, all other considerations being equal.

For further information please contact: Prof. Michael Heinzelmann (email: michael.heinzelmann(at)uni-koel.de).

Letter of application, CV,  list of publications, list of given lectures and diplomas (please do not send any original documents) to be sent to

Den Dekan der Philosophischen Fakultät der Universität zu Köln,
Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Köln.

Closing date is June 30th, 2013.

Digital.Humanities @ Oxford Summer School

Monday, June 10th, 2013

Noted on the Digital Classicist list:

The Digital.Humanities @ Oxford Summer School (DHOxSS) is an annual event for anyone working in the Digital Humanities. This year’s Summer School will be held on 8 – 12 July, at the University of Oxford. If you are a researcher, project manager, research assistant, or student of the Humanities, this is an opportunity for you to learn about the tools and methodology of digital humanities, and to make contact with others in your field. You will be introduced to topics spanning from creating, managing, analysing, modelling, visualizing, to publication of digital data for the Humanities. Visit http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/2013/ for more information.

With the DHOxSS’s customisable schedule, you book on one of our five-day workshops, and supplement this by booking several guest lectures from experts in their fields.

The main five-day training workshops this year are:

1. Cultural Connections: exchanging knowledge and widening participation in the Humanities
2. How to do Digital Humanities: Discovery, Analysis and Collaboration
3. A Humanities Web of Data: publishing, linking and querying on the semantic web.
4. An Introduction to XML and the Text Encoding Initiative
5. An Introduction to XSLT for Digital Humanists

There are a variety of evening events including a peer-reviewed poster session to give delegates a chance to demonstrate their work to the other delegates and speakers. The Thursday evening sees an elegant drinks reception and three-course banquet at historic Queen’s College, Oxford! (Well worth it!)

DHOxSS is a collaboration for Digital.Humanities @ Oxford between the University of Oxford’s IT Services, the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC), the Bodleian Libraries, and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities.

If you have questions, then email us at courses@it.ox.ac.uk for answers.
More details at: http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/2013/

James Cummings,
Director of DHOxSS

CFP: Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions

Friday, June 7th, 2013

Noted on the Antiquist list:

CALL FOR PAPERS
Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions (CRMEX)

http://www.ontotext.com/CRMEX

26th September 2013 in Valetta, Malta

A workshop affiliated with the 17th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL 2013)

http://www.tpdl2013.info/

Background and Objectives

The CIDOC CRM (international standard ISO 21127:2006) is a conceptual model and ontology with a fundamental role in many data integration efforts in the Digital Libraries and Cultural Heritage (CH) domain. It has spawned various CRM-compliant extensions, such as:

  • Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBRoo) for works and bibliographic data -
  • CRM Digitization (CRMdig) for digitization and provenance
  • CRM for English Heritage (CRMEH) for archaeology
  • British Museum Ontology (BMO) for museum objects
  • Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (SAWS) for medieval gnomologia (collections of wise sayings)
  • PRESSoo, a FRBRoo extension for serial publications (more…)

CFP: CAA2014 Paris Conference

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Seen on the Antiquist list:

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

You are warmly invited to take part in the CAA2014 Paris Conference, which will be held at the “Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne – Institut d’art et d’archéologie” 3 rue Michelet, 75006 Paris, France, from 22th to 25th April 2014.

The CAA (Computers Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology) is an international congress which has taken place every year for 40 years, the last being in Australia. This conference usually brings together hundreds of participants and works on the principle of parallel sessions and workshops or roundtables. (more…)

Seminar: Hestia 2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Via Leif Isaksen on the Digital Classicist list:

Dear all,

The AHRC-funded Hestia project is pleased to announce “Hestia2:
Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources”, a one-day seminar
on spatial network analysis and linked data in Classical studies,
archaeology and cultural heritage.

The seminar will be held at The University of Southampton on 18 July.
Registration for this event is free, but we do recommend registering
as early as possible since the number of available places is limited.
More information, including abstracts and registration, can be found
via the following link: http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/hestia-2013/

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Southampton!

Elton Barker, Stefan Bouzarovski, Leif Isaksen and Tom Brughmans (more…)

Open Book Digital Humanities Series

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Via Roberto Rosselli Del Turco on the Digital Classicist list:

Open Book Publishers is proud to announce the launch of a Digital Humanities Series. The series is overseen by an international board of experts and its books subjected to rigorous peer review. Its objective is to encourage and support the development of experimental monographs, edited volumes and collections that extend the boundaries of the field and help to strengthen its interrelations with the other disciplines of the arts, humanities and beyond. We are also interested in introductory guides for non-specialists, best practices guides for practitioners and “state of the art” surveys. The Series will offer digital humanists a dedicated venue for high-quality, Open Access publication.

Proposals in any area of the Digital Humanities are invited. For further details and instructions on how to submit please see
http://www.openbookpublishers.com/section/29/1/digital-humanities

Editorial Board

Paul Arthur, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Julia Flanders, Gary Hall, Brett
Hirsch, Matthew, L. Jockers, John Lavagnino, Willard McCarty, Roberto
Rosselli Del Turco and Elke Teich.

Open Book Publishers

Open Book is an independent academic publisher, run by scholars who are committed to making high-quality research available to readers around the world. We publish monographs and textbooks in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and offer the academic excellence of a traditional press, with the speed, convenience and accessibility of digital publishing. All our books are available to read for free online. To date we have 30 books in print, over 215,000 visits to these books via the Web and readers from over 125 countries. See http://www.openbookpublishers.com/ for more information.

Lecture: Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Via Simon Mahony:

The first of this Summer’s Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies seminars is this Friday.

Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton)
‘Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models’

Friday June 7 at 16:30
Room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Are lines of sight between Roman towns important for explaining their location? Through a case study on visibility patterns between urban settlements in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain, this paper will discuss how Exponential Random Graph Models (ERGM) can help explore hypothetical past processes of interaction and site location. With these models the frequency of certain subnetworks in random networks and the empirically attested network is compared, to examine the probability that the subnetworks might have emerged through random processes. This paper will critically evaluate the potential and limitations of such an approach for archaeology.

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

All are welcome

The full 2013 programme is at <http://digiclass.cch.kcl.ac.uk/wip/wip2013.html>

Job: British Library paid internship: digital mapping and medieval cartography

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Seen on the Antiquist list:

Date: Fri, 31 May 2013 16:29:52 +0100
From: KC Kowal <kckowal@GOOGLEMAIL.COM>
Subject: Internship: Virtual Mappa Research Associate

A part-time, 12-month, paid internship opportunity is available at the British Library. It would be ideal for a graduate student interested equally in digital mapping technologies for humanities research and medieval cartography.

Funded by a Digital Humanities Implementation Grant, DM: From Annotation to Dissemination dm.drew.edu<https://gs10.globalsuccessor.com/britishlibrary/dm.drew.edu>, is an exciting new project combining medieval research with the latest digital tools. The British Library is a partner in this project and is pleased to be able to host a research intern at the London St Pancras site.

In liaison with the Virtual Mappa Project Team, the Research Associate will work within the Cartographic and Topographical Materials section towards development of content and tools. He/she will create metadata and annotations for map and textual content; assist in design of templates and schemas; generate linked data, and identify external web resources (e.g. other digital repositories, database resources, bibliographic items). Working closely with and under the guidance of the Project Team with testing of new functionality, he/she will contribute to producing the project’s public face – a website virtually collecting the core group of maps and displaying various layers of annotations by different users or groups of users.

To read the full job description and to apply please see https://gs10.globalsuccessor.com/fe/tpl_britishlibrary01.asp?newms=sr Note that the closing date for this post is 16 June. Applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

Kimberly C. Kowal
Lead Curator, Digital Mapping
The British Library
96 Euston Rd.
London NW1 2DB
Tel: +44 (0)20 7412 7849

Open Philology Project Announced

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Via Marco Büchler, Greg Crane has just posted “The Open Philology Project and Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at Leipzig” at Perseus Digital Library Updates.

Abstract: The Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig sees in the rise of Digital Technologies an opportunity to re-assess and re-establish how the humanities can advance the understanding of the past and to support a dialogue among civilizations. Philology, which uses surviving linguistic sources to understand the past as deeply and broadly as possible, is central to these tasks, because languages, present and historical, are central to human culture. To advance this larger effort, the Humboldt Chair focuses upon enabling Greco-Roman culture to realize the fullest possible role in intellectual life. Greco-Roman culture is particularly significant because it contributed to both Europe and the Islamic world and the study of Greco-Roman culture and its influence thus entails Classical Arabic as well as Ancient Greek and Latin. The Humboldt Chair inaugurates an Open Philology Project with three complementary efforts that produce open philological data, educate a wide audience about historical languages, and integrate open philological data from many sources: the Open Greek and Latin Project organizes content (including translations into Classical Arabic and modern languages); the Historical Language e-Learning Project explores ways to support learning across barriers of language and culture as well as space and time; the Scaife Digital Library focuses on integrating cultural heritage sources available under open licenses.

Details of the project, its components, and rationale are provided in the original post.

Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Lecture announcement: http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/news/index.html#sep27

September 27, 2012
Lecture: “Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy.” John W. Hessler, Kluge Staff Fellow.
4:00 – 5:00 p.m., LJ-119, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress. Reception to follow.

Abstract

How accurately have culturally fundamental texts from literature, law, science, geography, and philosophy been handed down from ancient Rome and Greece to the present by way of scribal copying in the Middle Ages?  This fundamental question of how various manuscripts from a textual tradition have been transmitted through space and time has been the concern of scholars since at least the founding of the great Library of Alexandria in the third century BC.

Early Medieval scribes recognized that in the process of copying ancient texts mistakes were made, and that these errors became part of the textual tradition, to be passed on through history. They also realized that this process of copying error had a random or chaotic nature, and so they invented the demon Tutivillus, whom they considered to be the error’s source. Throughout the Renaissance scholars, like Erasmus, battled this demon in their attempts to re-construct important Latin and Greek manuscripts descended from antiquity. Later in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries scholars, like Karl Lachmann and Paul Krüger, tried to systematize a method in order to determine which parts of medieval manuscripts were errors, and which were the real readings descended from the original authors.

This paper will highlight a new computational technique to show how modern digital philology is changing the way we think of the transmission of medieval manuscripts through space and time, and is also helping to solve this seemingly simple, but unfortunately, rather complicated problem. Using the notes of the classical philologist Paul Krüger, whose manuscripts were recently rediscovered in the Law Library of Congress, complex three dimensional visualization techniques will be used to show how the medieval manuscripts making up the Codex of Justinian are spatially and temporally related to each other. This talk will also highlight how these new techniques give scholars the tools to postulate what the structure of missing and destroyed manuscripts might have been.  Using these methods, based in lattice theory and information entropy, this paper can be seen as a case study in how digital and computational algorithms are changing the face of even the most traditional of the humanities, classical philology.

The results of this study and my year long Kluge Fellowship will be published in the book  called, Roman Law in Ruins: a Computational Study of the Medieval Transmission of Justinian’s Codex. This has been made possible through a generous grant from the American Academy in Rome and it will be published copyright free both in hardcover and on the web by Franz-Steiner Verlag (Berlin) in February, 2014 as part of their Alte Geschichte Monograph Series.

Guide to Evagrius Ponticus

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

This just in from Joel Kalvesmaki:

I am pleased to announce the appearance of the Guide to Evagrius Ponticus, a digital-only, peer-reviewed reference work about the fourth-century monastic theologian. Updated quarterly, it provides definitive, integrated lists of Evagrius’s works, of editions and translations of those works, and of studies related to his life and thought. The Guide also includes a sourcebook of key ancient testimonies to Evagrius and his reception, in English translation, as well as a checklist of images from the ancient world.

The Guide takes relatively new approaches to open-access academic publishing in the digital humanities [ed: cc-nc-sa], and so is anticipated to develop over the coming years. Future editions will include a manuscript checklist, images of manuscripts, transcriptions of those manuscripts, and open-source critical editions of Evagrius’s writings.

http://evagriusponticus.net/

(For a more complete experience, read the Guide on a browser other than Internet Explorer.)

Linked Ancient World Data Institute at NYU (Spring 2012)

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) will host the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) from May 31st to June 2nd, 2012 in New York City. “Linked Open Data” is an approach to the creation of digital resources that emphasizes connections between diverse information on the basis of published and stable web addresses (URIs) that identify common concepts and individual items. LAWDI, funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for Humanities, will bring together an international faculty of practitioners working in the field of Linked Data with twenty attendees who are implementing or planning the creation of digital resources.

More information, including a list of faculty, and application instructions are available at the LAWDI page on the Digital Classicist wiki.

Postdoc in Digital Humanities: University of Alabama

Monday, November 28th, 2011

The Alabama Digital Humanities Center at the University of Alabama (http://www.lib.ua.edu/digitalhumanities) is pleased to invite applications for a post-doctoral fellowship in Digital Humanities. The fellowship offers the successful candidate a unique platform for professional advancement: financial and material support for independent research combined with the opportunity to play an instrumental role in nurturing the growing digital humanities community at the University of Alabama.

See the full announcement here.

„Historische Dokumente auf dem Weg zum digitalen Volltext“ – Turning Historical Documents into Digital Full Texts

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

From Marco Büchler:

The Munich DigitiZation Center (MDZ) of the Bavarian State Library invites you to Munich on Tuesday 11 October and Wednesday 12 October, 2011, for two conferences under the shared title “Historische Dokumente auf dem Weg zum digitalen Volltext – Turning Historical Documents into Digital Full Texts”.

Starting from different viewpoints, both events will focus on using OCR to create digital full texts. You can attend either event separately, or both together.

Please note: both conferences are German-speaking only!

October 11th – Results of OCR Research: IMPACT Demo Day

Jointly organised by the Munich DigitiZation Center of the Bavarian State Library and the Austrian National Library, this Demo Day will present research results and tools from the EU-funded IMPACT Project (IMProving ACcess to Text). It will focus on the challenges involved in creating searchable full text from historical documents, and show the tools and solutions created by IMPACT to resolve these challenges. It will also detail how project outputs will be made available once the project ends (December 2011). The event is open to anyone, but is mainly aimed at representatives from libraries, museums and archives.

October 12th – Insights from Practical Experience: OCR, Full Texts and Forms of Presentation

Digitisation projects can’t just present digital images anymore. User expectations are increasing steadily, and mobile devices and other technological forms of interaction bring their own challenges with them.

Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and searchable full text are therefore becoming more important. This has consequences for the entire project workflow – from its initial scoping and the choice of hardware, to the presentation of the results online. All of these challenges will be discussed at the conference.

The day will focus on the results of a number of full-text digitisation projects, detailing the particular issues presented by different types of source material. OCR software solutions will be compared, along with a number of post-capture processing tools and techniques, including crowdsourcing to improve OCR.

“Insights from Practical Experience: OCR, Full Texts and Forms of Presentation” is free of charge, thanks to our sponsors: Abbyy Europe, ARPA Data, Image Access, Treventus Mechatronics and Zeutschel.

For more information about the programme and registration, please visit::

http://www.muenchener-digitalisierungszentrum.de/~lza/impact/index.html?c=info&l=en

The deadline for registration is September 25th. Please remember, the events will be German-speaking only.

Contact details:

Munich DigitiZation Center (MDZ) Digital Library
Bavarian State Library
Fedor Bochow / Mark-Oliver Fischer
Ludwigstrasse16
80539 Munich
Germany

mdz[at]bsb-muenchen.de

Tel. +49 (0) 89 28638 2295
oder +49 (0) 89 28638 2890
Fax +49 (0) 89 28638 2672

http://www.muenchener-digitalisierungszentrum.de

http://www.bsb-muenchen.de

Workshop on Digital Humanities and the Study of Religion in Antiquity

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

From Michael Satlow at Brown University. Please direct all questions to him.

WORKSHOP CALL FOR PAPERS
FEBRUARY 13-14, 2012
BROWN UNIVERSITY

The Program in Judaic Studies in collaboration with the Brown University Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship is pleased to announce plans for a two-day workshop devoted to investigating the ways in which the digital humanities has or can change the study of religion in antiquity. The workshop will take place on February 13-14, 2012, at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

We invite proposals for papers and presentations that explore the intersection of ancient religion and the digital humanities. We are particularly interested in presentations of projects that have the potential to open up new questions and avenues of research. Can digital tools not only allow us to do our work faster and more thoroughly but also enable entirely new kinds of research? How might different digital data (e.g., textual, geographic, and material culture) be used together most productively? The workshop will concentrate primarily on research rather than directly on pedagogy or scholarly communication. One session will be devoted to “nuts and bolts” issues of funding and starting a digital project.

The focus of the workshop will be on the religions of West Asia and the Mediterranean basin through the early Islamic period. Proposals relating to other regions, however, will also be considered.

More and updated information can be found at: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Judaic_Studies/AncientReligionModernTechnologyWorkshop.html

Please submit proposals of up to 300 words by October 31, 2011, to Michael Satlow (Michael_Satlow@Brown.edu).

TRAIL 2011: Training and Research in the Archaeological Interpretation of Lidar

Monday, January 24th, 2011

From Rachel Opitz:

TRAIL 2011 Training and Research in the Archaeological Interpretation of Lidar
14-16 March 2011, European Research Centre at Bibracte, Glux-en-Glenne, France

The objective of these days is to create a forum for discussion for professionals, researchers and students who have previously worked with LiDAR or are currently involved in the preparatory or active phase of a project using LiDAR. The exchanges at this workshop aim to show the potential of the technology for archaeological applications, to discuss possibilities for coordination, method sharing and to outline research perspectives at the European level.

This workshop will be organized in two phases:

  • Two half-day sessions targeted for archaeologists who are not LiDAR specialists but who are interested in the potential archaeological applications;
  • Two half-day sessions targeting archaeologists already familiar with the technology.

Application forms and more information are available from: http://modelter.zrc-sazu.si/ .

Please direct any questions to Rachel Opitz at rachel.opitz@mshe.univ-fcomte.fr.

Immediate Opening: Digital Papyrology Programmer

Monday, December 13th, 2010

This position, previously announced, has been re-opened for a 12-month tenure, beginning January 2011.

New York University
Programmer/Analyst

New York University’s Division of the Libraries seeks a Programmer/Analyst to work on the “Papyrological Navigator” (http://papyri.info) and associated systems. Papyri.info is a web-based research portal that provides scholars worldwide with the ability to search, browse and collaboratively edit texts, transcriptions, images and metadata relating to ancient texts on papyri, pottery fragments and other material. The incumbent will work closely with the Project Coordinator and with scholars involved in the project at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, Duke University, the University of Kentucky and the University of Heidelberg, as well as with NYU Digital Library Technology staff.

The incumbent’s initial responsibilities will include: close collaboration with project team members to enhance and extend a robust production environment at NYU for the ongoing ingest and processing of new and updated text transcriptions, metadata and digital images; performing both analysis and programming of any required changes or enhancements to current PN applications.

Candidates should have the following skills:

  • Bachelor’s degree in computer or information science and 3 years of relevant experience or equivalent combination
  • Must include experience developing web applications using Java
  • Demonstrated knowledge of Java, Javascript, Tomcat, Saxon, Lucene, Apache, SQL, XML, XSLT
  • Experience with metadata standards (e.g. TEI, EpiDoc)
  • Experience working in Unix/Linux environments
  • Preferred: Experience with Apache Solr, RDF triple stores (e.g. Mulgara), Clojure
  • Preferred: Experience designing, building, and deploying distributed systems
  • Preferred: Experience working with non-Roman Unicode-based textual data (esp. Greek)
  • Excellent communication and analytical skills

Applicants should submit resume and cover letter, which reflects how applicant’s education and experience match the job requirements.

NYU offers a competitive salary and superior benefit package, which includes tuition benefits for self and eligible family members, generous vacation, medical, dental, and retirement plans. For more information about working at NYU visit our website at: www.nyucareers.com.

To apply:

To apply for this position online, visit
http://www.nyucareers.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=52507

NYU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Digital Papyrology Position at NYU

Monday, September 13th, 2010

New York University
Programmer/Analyst

New York University’s Division of the Libraries seeks a Programmer/Analyst to work on the “Papyrological Navigator” (http://papyri.info) and associated systems. Papyri.info is a web-based research portal that provides scholars worldwide with the ability to search, browse and collaboratively edit texts, transcriptions, images and metadata relating to ancient texts on papyri, pottery fragments and other material. The incumbent will work closely with the Project Coordinator and with scholars involved in the project at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, Duke University, the University of Kentucky and the University of Heidelberg, as well as with NYU Digital Library Technology staff.

The incumbent’s initial responsibilities will include: close collaboration with project team members to enhance and extend a robust production environment at NYU for the ongoing ingest and processing of new and updated text transcriptions, metadata and digital images; performing both analysis and programming of any required changes or enhancements to current PN applications.

Candidates should have the following skills:

  • Bachelor’s degree in computer or information science and 3 years of relevant experience or equivalent combination
  • Must include experience developing web applications using Java
  • Demonstrated knowledge of Java, Javascript, Tomcat, Saxon, Lucene, Apache, SQL, XML, XSLT
  • Experience with metadata standards (e.g. TEI, EpiDoc)
  • Experience working in Unix/Linux environments
  • Preferred: Experience with Apache Solr, RDF triple stores (e.g. Mulgara), Clojure
  • Preferred: Experience designing, building, and deploying distributed systems
  • Preferred: Experience working with non-Roman Unicode-based textual data (esp. Greek)
  • Excellent communication and analytical skills

Applicants should submit resume and cover letter, which reflects how applicant’s education and experience match the job requirements.

NYU offers a competitive salary and superior benefit package, which includes tuition benefits for self and eligible family members, generous vacation, medical, dental, and retirement plans. For more information about working at NYU visit our website at: www.nyucareers.com.

To apply:

To apply for this position online, visit
http://www.nyucareers.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=52507

NYU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.