Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2017/18

Friday, October 6th, 2017

We are delighted to announce that the programme for this year’s Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2017/18 is now available. You can find it online at http://de.digitalclassicist.org/berlin/seminar2017, at the bottom of this email or as a ready-to-print poster.

The seminar series will start on Oct. 16 with a talk by Rebecca Kahn (HIIG Berlin) “An Introduction to Peripleo 2 – Pelagios Commons’ Linked Data Exploration Engine”. This year’s keynote lecture will be given by Leif Scheuermann (ACDH, University Graz) on Oct. 30 and is entitled “Approaches towards a genuine digital hermeneutic”.

This year there will be a couple of organizational changes: seminars will take place on Mondays starting at 17:00 (instead of Tuesdays), and they will be held on a fortnightly basis either in Berlin-Mitte at the Humboldt University (Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, Institutsgebäude (HV 5), room 0319) or in Berlin-Dahlem at the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (Wiegandhaus, Podbielskiallee 69-71, entrance via Peter-Lenne-Str.).

We would also like to draw your attention to the possibility for students to attend the seminar as part of their curriculum, because the seminar is also offered by the Humboldt University as a “Ringvorlesung” (see the HU’s course catalog and the DH Course Regisrtry).

We would be very grateful if you could disseminate this email and the poster to others. We are looking forward to seeing you in the Seminar!

Programme

16.10.2017 (HU)
Rebecca Kahn et al. (HIIG)
“An Introduction to Peripleo 2 – Pelagios Commons’ Linked Data Exploration Engine”

30.10.2017 (DAI)
Leif Scheuermann (TOPOI)
“Approaches towards a genuine digital hermeneutic”

13.11.2017 (HU)
Gregory Gilles (KCL)
“Family or Faction? Using Cicero’s Letters to Map the Political, Social and Familial Relationships Between Senators During the Civil War of 49-45BC”

27.11.2017 (DAI)
Ainsley Hawthorn (LMU Munich)
“Hacking Sumerian A Database Approach to the Analysis of Ancient Languages”

11.12.2017 (HU)
Lieve Donnelland (Uni Amsterdam)
“Network analysis as a tool for studying early urbanisation in Italy”

8.1.2018 (DAI)
Sabrina Pietrobono (Università Degli Studi Dell’Aquila)
“GIS tool for interdisciplinary landscape studies”

22.1.2018 (HU)
Simona Stoyanova & Gabriel Bodard (ICS)
“Cataloguing Open Access Classics Serials”

5.2.2018 (DAI)
Francesco Mambrini et al. (DAI)
“The iDAI.publications from open digital publishing to text mining”

OEDUc: Disambiguating EDH person RDF working group

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

One of the working groups at the Open Epigraphic Data Unconference (OEDUc) meeting in London (May 15, 2017) focussed on disambiguating EDH person RDF. Since the Epigraphic Database Heidelberg (EDH) has made all of its data available to download in various formats in an Open Data Repository, it is possible to extract the person data from the EDH Linked Data RDF.

A first step in enriching this prosopographic data might be to link the EDH person names with PIR and Trismegistos (TM) references. At this moment the EDH person RDF only contains links to attestations of persons, rather than unique individuals (although it attaches only one REF entry to persons who have multiple occurrences in the same text), so we cannot use the EDH person URI to disambiguate persons from different texts.

Given that EDH already contains links to PIR in its bibliography, we could start with extracting (this should be possible using a simple Python script) and linking these to the EDH person REF. In the case where there is only one person attested in a text, the PIR reference can be linked directly to the RDF of that EDH person attestation. If, however (and probably in most cases), there are multiple person references in a text, we should try another procedure (possibly by looking at the first letter of the EDH name and matching it to the alphabetical PIR volume).

A second way of enriching the EDH person RDF could be done by using the Trismegistos People portal. At the moment this database of persons and attestations of persons in texts consists mostly of names from papyri (from Ptolemaic Egypt), but TM is in the process of adding all names from inscriptions (using an automated NER script on the textual data from EDCS via the EAGLE project). Once this is completed, it will be possible to use the stable TM PER ID (for persons) and TM person REF ID (for attestations of persons) identifiers (and URIs) to link up with EDH.

The recommended procedure to follow would be similar to the one of PIR. Whenever there’s a one-to-one relationship with a single EDH person reference the TM person REF ID could be directly linked to it. In case of multiple attestations of different names in an inscription, we could modify the TM REF dataset by first removing all double attestations, and secondly matching the remaining ones to the EDH RDF by making use of the order of appearance (in EDH the person that occurs first in an inscription receives a URI (?) that consists of the EDH text ID and an integer representing the place of the name in the text (e.g., http://edh-www.adw.uni-heidelberg.de/edh/person/HD000001/1 is the first appearing person name in text HD000001). Finally, we could check for mistakes by matching the first character(s) of the EDH name with the first character(s) of the TM REF name. Ultimately, by using the links from the TM REF IDs with the TM PER IDs we could send back to EDH which REF names are to be considered the same person and thus further disambiguating their person RDF data.

This process would be a good step in enhancing the SNAP:DRGN-compliant RDF produced by EDH, which was also addressed in another working group: recommendations for EDH person-records in SNAP RDF.

OEDUc: EDH and Pelagios location disambiguation Working Group

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

From the beginning of the un-conference, an interest in linked open geodata seemed to be shared by a number of participants. Moreover, an attention towards gazetteers and alignment appeared among the desiderata for the event, expressed by the EDH developers. So, in the second part of the unconference, we had a look at what sort of geographic information can be found in the EDH and what could be added.

The discussion, of course, involved Pelagios and Pleiades and their different but related roles in establishing links between sources of geographical information. EDH is already one of the contributors of the Pelagios LOD ecosystem. Using the Pleiades IDs to identify places, it was relatively easy for the EDH to make its database compatible with Pelagios and discoverable on Peripleo, Pelagios’s search and visualisation engine.

However, looking into the data available for downloads, we focused on a couple things. One is that each of the epigraphic texts in the EDH has, of course, a unique identifier (EDH text IDs). The other is that each of the places mentioned has, also, a unique identifier (EDH geo IDs), besides the Pleiades ID. As one can imagine, the relationships between texts and places can be one to one, or one to many (as a place can be related to more than one text and a text can be related to more than one place). All places mentioned in the EDH database have an EDH geo ID, and the information becomes especially relevant in the case of those places that do not have already an ID in Pleiades or GeoNames. In this perspective, EDH geo IDs fill the gaps left by the other two gazetteer and meet the specific needs of the EDH.

Exploring Peripleo to see what information from the EDH can be found in it and how it gets visualised, we noticed that only the information about the texts appear as resources (identified by the diamond icon), while the EDH geo IDs do not show as a gazetteer-like reference, as it happen for other databases, such as Trismegistos or Vici.

So we decided to do a little work on the EDH geo IDs, more specifically:

  1. To extract them and treat them as a small, internal gazetteer that could be contributed to Pelagios. Such feature wouldn’t represent a substantial change in the way EDH is used, or how the data are found in Peripleo, but we thought it could  improve the visibility of the EDH in the Pelagios panorama, and, possibly, act as an intermediate step for the matching of different gazetteers that focus in the ancient world.
  2. The idea of using the EDH geo IDs as bridges sounded interesting especially when thinking of the possible interaction with the Trismegistos database, so we wondered if a closer collaboration between the two projects couldn’t benefit them both. Trismegistos, in fact, is another project with substantial geographic information: about 50.000 place-names mapped against Pleiades, Wikipedia and GeoNames. Since the last Linked Past conference, they have tried to align their place-names with Pelagios, but the operation was successful only for 10,000 of them. We believe that enhancing the links between Trismegistos and EDH could make them better connected to each other and both more effectively present in the LOD ecosystem around the ancient world.

With these two objectives in mind, we downloaded the geoJSON dump from the EDH website and extracted the texts IDs, the geo IDs, and their relationships. Once the lists (that can be found on the git hub repository) had been created, it becomes relatively straightforward to try and match the EDH geoIDs with the Trismegistos GeoIDs. In this way, through the intermediate step of the geographical relationships between text IDs and geo IDs in EDH, Trismegistos also gains a better and more informative connection with the EDH texts.

This first, quick attempt at aligning geodata using their common references, might help testing how good the automatic matches are, and start thinking of how to troubleshoot mismatches and other errors. This closer look at geographical information also brought up a small bug in the EDH interface: in the internal EDH search, when there is a connection to a place that does not have a Pleiades ID, the website treats it as an error, instead of, for example, referring to the internal EDH geoIDs. Maybe something that is worth flagging to the EDH developers and that, in a way, underlines another benefit of treating the EDH geo IDs as a small gazetteer of its own.

In the end, we used the common IDs (either in Pleiades or GeoNames) to do a first alignment between the Trismegistos and EDH places IDs. We didn’t have time to check the accuracy (but you are welcome to take this experiment one step further!) but we fully expect to get quite a few positive results. And we have a the list of EDH geoIDs ready to be re-used for other purposes and maybe to make its debut on the Peripleo scene.

OEDUc: recommendations for EDH person-records in SNAP RDF

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

At the first meeting of the Open Epigraphic Data Unconference (OEDUc) in London in May 2017, one of the working groups that met in the afternoon (and claim to have completed our brief, so do not propose to meet again) examined the person-data offered for download on the EDH open data repository, and made some recommendations for making this data more compatible with the SNAP:DRGN guidelines.

Currently, the RDF of a person-record in the EDH data (in TTL format) looks like:

<http://edh-www.adw.uni-heidelberg.de/edh/person/HD000001/1>
    a lawd:Person ;
    lawd:PersonalName "Nonia Optata"@lat ;
    gndo:gender <http://d-nb.info/standards/vocab/gnd/gender#female> ;
    nmo:hasStartDate "0071" ;
    nmo:hasEndDate "0130" ;
    snap:associatedPlace <http://edh-www.adw.uni-heidelberg.de/edh/geographie/11843> ,
        <http://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432808#this> ;
    lawd:hasAttestation <http://edh-www.adw.uni-heidelberg.de/edh/inschrift/HD000001> .

We identified a few problems with this data structure, and made recommendations as follows.

  1. We propose that EDH split the current person references in edh_people.ttl into: (a) one lawd:Person, which has the properties for name, gender, status, membership, and hasAttestation, and (b) one lawd:PersonAttestation, which has properties dct:Source (which points to the URI for the inscription itself) and lawd:Citation. Date and location etc. can then be derived from the inscription (which is where they belong).
  2. A few observations:
    1. Lawd:PersonalName is a class, not a property. The recommended property for a personal name as a string is foaf:name
    2. the language tag for Latin should be @la (not lat)
    3. there are currently thousands of empty strings tagged as Greek
    4. Nomisma date properties cannot be used on person, because the definition is inappropriate (and unclear)
    5. As documented, Nomisma date properties refer only to numismatic dates, not epigraphic (I would request a modification to their documentation for this)
    6. the D-N.B ontology for gender is inadequate (which is partly why SNAP has avoided tagging gender so far); a better ontology may be found, but I would suggest plain text values for now
    7. to the person record, above, we could then add dct:identifier with the PIR number (and compare discussion of plans for disambiguation of PIR persons in another working group)

Global Philology Workshop Week in Leipzig

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

Within the framework of the BMBF funded Global Philology Planning Project, we would like to announce three workshops that will be taking place at the University of Leipzig in the next two weeks:

Pleiades sprint on Pompeian buildings

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

Casa della Statuetta Indiana, Pompei.

Monday the 26th of June, from 15 to 17 BST, Pleiades organises an editing sprint to create additional URIs for Pompeian buildings, preferably looking at those located in Regio I, Insula 8.

Participants will meet remotely on the Pleiades IRC chat. Providing monument-specific IDs will enable a more efficient and granular use and organisation of Linked Open Data related to Pompeii, and will support the work of digital projects such as the Ancient Graffiti.

Everyone is welcome to join, but a Pleiades account is required to edit the online gazetteer.

OEDUc: EDH and Pelagios NER working group

Monday, June 19th, 2017

Participants:  Orla Murphy, Sarah Middle, Simona Stoyanova, Núria Garcia Casacuberta

Report: https://github.com/EpiDoc/OEDUc/wiki/EDH-and-Pelagios-NER

The EDH and Pelagios NER working group was part of the Open Epigraphic Data Unconference held on 15 May 2017. Our aim was to use Named Entity Recognition (NER) on the text of inscriptions from the Epigraphic Database Heidelberg (EDH) to identify placenames, which could then be linked to their equivalent terms in the Pleiades gazetteer and thereby integrated with Pelagios Commons.

Data about each inscription, along with the inscription text itself, is stored in one XML file per inscription. In order to perform NER, we therefore first had to extract the inscription text from each XML file (contained within <ab></ab> tags), then strip out any markup from the inscription to leave plain text. There are various Python libraries for processing XML, but most of these turned out to be a bit too complex for what we were trying to do, or simply returned the identifier of the <ab> element rather than the text it contained.

Eventually, we found the Python library Beautiful Soup, which converts an XML document to structured text, from which you can identify your desired element, then strip out the markup to convert the contents of this element to plain text. It is a very simple and elegant solution with only eight lines of code to extract and convert the inscription text from one specific file. The next step is to create a script that will automatically iterate through all files in a particular folder, producing a directory of new files that contain only the plain text of the inscriptions.

Once we have a plain text file for each inscription, we can begin the process of named entity extraction. We decided to follow the methods and instructions shown in the two Sunoikisis DC classes on Named Entity Extraction:

https://github.com/SunoikisisDC/SunoikisisDC-2016-2017/wiki/Named-Entity-Extraction-I

https://github.com/SunoikisisDC/SunoikisisDC-2016-2017/wiki/Named-Entity-Extraction-II

Here is a short outline of the steps might involve when this is done in the future.

  1. Extraction
    1. Split text into tokens, make a python list
    2. Create a baseline
      1. cycle through each token of the text
      2. if the token starts with a capital letter it’s a named entity (only one type, i.e. Entity)
    3. Classical Language Toolkit (CLTK)
      1. for each token in a text, the tagger checks whether that token is contained within a predefined list of possible named entities
      2. Compare to baseline
    4. Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK)
      1. Stanford NER Tagger for Italian works well with Latin
      2. Differentiates between different kinds of entities: place, person, organization or none of the above, more granular than CLTK
      3. Compare to both baseline and CLTK lists
  2. Classification
    1. Part-Of-Speech (POS) tagging – precondition before you can perform any other advanced operation on a text, information on the word class (noun, verb etc.); TreeTagger
    2. Chunking – sub-dividing a section of text into phrases and/or meaningful constituents (which may include 1 or more text tokens); export to IOB notation
    3. Computing entity frequency
  3. Disambiguation

Although we didn’t make as much progress as we would have liked, we have achieved our aim of creating a script to prepare individual files for NER processing, and have therefore laid the groundwork for future developments in this area. We hope to build on this work to successfully apply NER to the inscription texts in the EDH in order to make them more widely accessible to researchers and to facilitate their connection to other, similar resources, like Pelagios.

Open Epigraphic Data Unconference report

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017

Last month, a dozen or so scholars met in London (and were joined by a similar number via remote video-conference) to discuss and work on the open data produced by the Epigraphic Database Heidelberg. (See call and description.)

Over the course of the day seven working groups were formed, two of which completed their briefs within the day, but the other five will lead to ongoing work and discussion. Fuller reports from the individual groups will follow here shortly, but here is a short summary of the activities, along with links to the pages in the Wiki of the OEDUc Github repository.

Useful links:

  1. All interested colleagues are welcome to join the discussion group: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/oeduc
  2. Code, documentation, and other notes are collected in the Github repository: https://github.com/EpiDoc/OEDUc

1. Disambiguating EDH person RDF
(Gabriel Bodard, Núria García Casacuberta, Tom Gheldof, Rada Varga)
We discussed and broadly specced out a couple of steps in the process for disambiguating PIR references for inscriptions in EDH that contain multiple personal names, for linking together person references that cite the same PIR entry, and for using Trismegistos data to further disambiguate EDH persons. We haven’t written any actual code to implement this yet, but we expect a few Python scripts would do the trick.

2. Epigraphic ontology
(Hugh Cayless, Paula Granados, Tim Hill, Thomas Kollatz, Franco Luciani, Emilia Mataix, Orla Murphy, Charlotte Tupman, Valeria Vitale, Franziska Weise)
This group discussed the various ontologies available for encoding epigraphic information (LAWDI, Nomisma, EAGLE Vocabularies) and ideas for filling the gaps between this. This is a long-standing desideratum of the EpiDoc community, and will be an ongoing discussion (perhaps the most important of the workshop).

3. Images and image metadata
(Angie Lumezeanu, Sarah Middle, Simona Stoyanova)
This group attempted to write scripts to track down copyright information on images in EDH (too complicated, but EAGLE may have more of this), download images and metadata (scripts in Github), and explored the possibility of embedding metadata in the images in IPTC format (in progress).

4. EDH and SNAP:DRGN mapping
(Rada Varga, Scott Vanderbilt, Gabriel Bodard, Tim Hill, Hugh Cayless, Elli Mylonas, Franziska Weise, Frank Grieshaber)
In this group we revised the status of SNAP:DRGN recommendations for person-data in RDF, and then looked in detail about the person list exported from the EDH data. A list of suggestions for improving this data was produced for EDH to consider. This task was considered to be complete. (Although Frank may have feedback or questions for us later.)

5. EDH and Pelagios NER
(Orla Murphy, Sarah Middle, Simona Stoyanova, Núria Garcia Casacuberta, Thomas Kollatz)
This group explored the possibility of running machine named entity extraction on the Latin texts of the EDH inscriptions, in two stages: extracting plain text from the XML (code in Github); applying CLTK/NLTK scripts to identify entities (in progress).

6. EDH and Pelagios location disambiguation
(Paula Granados, Valeria Vitale, Franco Luciani, Angie Lumezeanu, Thomas Kollatz, Hugh Cayless, Tim Hill)
This group aimed to work on disambiguating location information in the EDH data export, for example making links between Geonames place identifiers, TMGeo places, Wikidata and Pleiades identifiers, via the Pelagios gazetteer or other linking mechanisms. A pathway for resolving was identified, but work is still ongoing.

7. Exist-db mashup application
(Pietro Liuzzo)
This task, which Dr Liuzzo carried out alone, since his network connection didn’t allow him to join any of the discussion groups on the day, was to create an implementation of existing code for displaying and editing epigraphic editions (using Exist-db, Leiden+, etc.) and offer a demonstration interface by which the EDH data could be served up to the public and contributions and improvements invited. (A preview “epigraphy.info” perhaps?)

Digital Classicist London seminar 2017 programme

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017

Institute of Classical Studies

Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Fridays at 16:30 in room 234*

Jun 2 Sarah Middle (Open University) Linked Data and Ancient World Research: studying past projects from a user perspective
Jun 9 Donald Sturgeon (Harvard University) Crowdsourcing a digital library of pre-modern Chinese
Jun 16* Valeria Vitale et al. (Institute of Classical Studies) Recogito 2: linked data without the pointy brackets
Jun 23* Dimitar Iliev et al. (University of Sofia “St. Kliment Ohridski”) Historical GIS of South-Eastern Europe
Jun 30

&

Lucia Vannini (Institute of Classical Studies) The role of Digital Humanities in Papyrology: Practices and user needs in papyrological research

Paula Granados García (Open University) Cultural Contact in Early Roman Spain through Linked Open Data resources

Jul 7 Elisa Nury (King’s College London) Collation Visualization: Helping Users to Explore Collated Manuscripts
Jul 14 Sarah Ketchley (University of Washington) Re-Imagining Nineteenth Century Nile Travel & Excavation for a Digital Age: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project
Jul 21 Dorothea Reule & Pietro Liuzzo (Hamburg University) Issues in the development of digital projects based on user requirements. The case of Beta maāḥǝft
Jul 28 Rada Varga (Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca) Romans 1by1: Transferring information from ancient people to modern users

*Except Jun 16 & 23, room G34

digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2017.html

This series is focussed on user and reader needs of digital projects or resources, and assumed a wide definition of classics including the whole ancient world more broadly than only the Greco-Roman Mediterranean. The seminars will be pitched at a level suitable for postgraduate students or interested colleagues in Archaeology, Classics, Digital Humanities and related fields.

Digital Classicist London seminar is organized by Gabriel Bodard, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale (ICS) and Simon Mahony and Eleanor Robson (UCL).

ALL WELCOME

Open Epigraphic Data Unconference, London, May 15, 2017

Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017

Open Epigraphic Data Unconference
10:00–17:00, May 15, 2017, Institute of Classical Studies

This one-day workshop, or “unconference,” brings together scholars, historians and data scientists with a shared interest in classical epigraphic data. The event involves no speakers or set programme of presentations, but rather a loose agenda, to be further refined in advance or on the day, which is to use, exploit, transform and “mash-up” with other sources the Open Data recently made available by the Epigraphic Database Heidelberg under a Creative Commons license. Both present and remote participants with programming and data-processing experience, and those with an interest in discussing and planning data manipulation and aggregation at a higher level, are welcomed.

Places at the event in London are limited; please contact <gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk> if you would like to register to attend.

There will also be a Google Hangout opened on the day, for participants who are not able to attend in person. We hope this event will only be the beginning of a longer conversation and project to exploit and disseminate this invaluable epigraphic dataset.

Historia Ludens: Conference on History and Gaming, 19 May 2017

Friday, April 28th, 2017

Posted on behalf of Alexander von Lünen (to whom queries should be addressed):

University of Huddersfield
19 May 2017

This conference follows up on the workshop “Playing with History” that has been held in November 2015 in Huddersfield. Gaming and History is gaining more and more traction, either as means to “gamify” history education or museum experiences, or as computer games as prism into history like the popular History Respawned podcast series (http://www.historyrespawned.com/).

Besides discussing gamification or using (computer) games, we also want to explore gaming and playing in a broader historical-cultural sense. Can “playing” be used as category for historical scholarship, maybe alongside other categories such as gender, space or class? Historian Johan Huizinga’s Homo Ludens from 1938 looked at play and its importance for human culture. Can historians make similar cases for more specific histories? In recent publications historians have pointed to the connection between cities and play. Simon Sleight, for example, has worked on the history of childhood and urban history, i.e. young people appropriating public urban spaces for their ludic activities and their struggle with authorities over this. Archaeologists, as another example, have shown that much of the urban infrastructure of Ancient Rome was dedicated to games, playing and gambling, as it had such a big role in Roman life.

The conference will thus discuss terms like “gaming”, “playing” and “history” in broad terms. There are academic papers in the morning and round-table sessions in the afternoon for networking and demos.

Tickets (£10) are available via the University of Huddersfield web shop. Please note: there are travel/conference bursaries for postgraduate students available on request; please contact Dr Alexander von Lünen (a.f.vonlunen@hud.ac.uk) for details.

Full details and programme at https://hudddighum.wordpress.com/2017/03/06/historia-ludens-conference-on-history-and-gaming-19-may-2017/

CFP: Cyborg Classics: An Interdisciplinary Symposium

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

Forwarded on behalf of Silvie Kilgallon (to whom enqueries should be addressed):

We are pleased to announce a one-day symposium, sponsored by BIRTHA (The Bristol Institute for Research in the Humanities and Arts) to be held at the University of Bristol, on Friday July 7th 2017.

Keynote speakers:

  • Dr Kate Devlin (Goldsmiths)
  • Dr Genevieve Liveley (Bristol)
  • Dr Rae Muhlstock (NYU)

The aim of the day is to bring together researchers from different disciplines – scholars in Archaeology & Anthropology, Classics, English, History, and Theology as well as in AI, Robotics, Ethics, and Medicine – to share their work on automata, robots, and cyborgs. Ultimately, the aim is an edited volume and the development of further collaborative research projects.

Indicative key provocations include:

  • To what extent do myths and narratives about automata, robots, and cyborgs raise questions that are relevant to contemporary debates concerning robot, cyborg, and AI product innovation?
  • To what extent, and how, can contemporary debate concerning robot, cyborg, and AI product innovation rescript ancient myths and narratives about automata, robots, and cyborgs.
  • Can interdisciplinary dialogues between the ‘soft’ humanities and the ‘hard’ sciences of robotics and AI be developed? And to what benefit?
  • How might figures such as Pandora, Pygmalion’s statue, and Talos help inform current polarized debates concerning robot, cyborg, and AI ethics?
  • What are the predominant narrative scripts and frames that shape the public understanding of robotics and AI? How could these be re-coded?

We invite scholars working across the range of Classics and Ancient History (including Classical Reception) and across the Humanities more widely to submit expressions of interest and/or a title and abstract (of no more than 250 words) to the symposium coordinator, Silvie Kilgallon (silvie.kilgallon@bristol.ac.uk). PhD students are warmly encouraged to contribute. The deadline for receipt of abstracts is May 31st, 2017.

CFP: Digital Textual Editions and Corpora

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

Digital Classics Association
Call for papers for the January 4-7, 2018 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Boston

“Digital Textual Editions and Corpora”

Organizer: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY ncoffee@buffalo.edu

The discovery, editing, and publication of classical texts has been a foundational activity in the study of antiquity. The creation of born-digital editions of classical texts and of digital textual corpora has led to a resurgence of interest in the curation and editing of texts, so that they can be made more broadly accessible online and enhanced with features only possible through digital representation. The aim of this panel is to inform the SCS membership and engage them in a discussion regarding the current state of the art in the curation and publication of digital editions and corpora, as well as likely future directions. Abstracts are invited in two complementary areas. Scholars with experience working with contemporary digital editions and corpora are invited to discuss their experience. This might involve creating a digital edition or corpus, or it might involve a research project that intensively engaged with one. Scholars who have set up digital corpora and/or editing environments, or who work on conventions or other software that underlie such corpora are invited to relate their experience as well. Papers can address completed work, but can also be devoted partly or entirely to ongoing work, problems, or challenges.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously in accordance with SCS regulations. Submitters should confirm in their emails that they are SCS members in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the SCS website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is March 1, 2017.

SCS website version: https://goo.gl/m21JQG

Digital Classicist London 2017 CFP

Monday, January 30th, 2017

The Digital Classicist London seminar invites proposals with a focus on the needs of users/readers, for the summer 2017 season, which will run on Friday afternoons in June and July in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London.

We welcome proposals in any area of classics, including ancient history, archaeology and reception, that employ digital or other innovative and collaborative approaches to the study of the ancient world (including cultures beyond the Mediterranean). Researchers of all levels, including students and professional practitioners, are welcome, and we expect a diverse audience of philologists and historians, information scientists and digital humanists, graduate students and interested members of the public.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a paper, please email an abstract of up to 500 words as an attachment to gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk by March 19th, 2017.

The seminar is organized by Gabriel Bodard, Simon Mahony, Eleanor Robson, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale. For full details, and previous years’ programmes, see http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2017.html

Classical Philology Goes Digital, University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Classical Philology Goes Digital. Working on Textual Phenomena of Ancient Texts
University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017

Organization: Karen Blaschka (Universität Potsdam) and Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig)
Funded by the Volkswagen Stiftung

Thursday, February 16, 2017
9.00
Welcome Address by the Vice Dean Prof. Dr. Johannes Haag
Opening (Monica Berti / Karen Blaschka)

I. DH-keynote-speakers (part I)
Chair: Neil Coffee (University at Buffalo)
9.30
Gregory R. Crane (Universität Leipzig/Tufts University), Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age
10:10
Franz Fischer (CCeH / IDE Köln), Digital Philology and the (cr)apparatus

10.50
Coffee Break

Chair: Gregory R. Crane (Universität Leipzig/Tufts University)
11:10
Francesco Mambrini (DAI, Berlin), The Syntax of Similes. A Treebank-based Exploration of Simile in Greek Poetry
11:50
Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig), Documenting Text Reuse of Greek Fragmentary Authors
12.30
Break for lunch

II. Project presentations (part I)
Chair: Karen Blaschka (Universität Potsdam)
13.30
Maria Vasiloudi, Carl W. Brunschön (Universität des Saarlandes/BBAW Berlin), Iatrosophia-digital: Die Rezeption antiker medizinischer Texte in griechischen Iatrosophia-Handschriften vom 13. bis 19. Jh.
Marie Revellio (Zukunftskolleg Universität Konstanz), Citation Practices in Jerome’s Letters as Vestigia of Late Antique Identit Construction
14.50
Coffee Break (more…)

EpiDoc training workshop, London, April 2017

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

We invite applications to participate in a training workshop on digital editing of papyrological and epigraphic texts, at the Institute of Classical Studies, London, April 3–7, 2017. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard and Lucia Vannini (ICS) and Simona Stoyanova (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc: Ancient Documents in XML

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the online Papyrological Editor tool.

The workshop will assume knowledge of papyrology or epigraphy; Greek, Latin or another ancient language; and the Leiden Conventions. No technical skills are required, and scholars of all levels, from students to professors, are welcome. To apply, please email gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk with a brief description of your background and reason for application, by February 14, 2017.

(Revised to bring back deadline for applications to Feb 14th.)

Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2016/17

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

We are delighted to announce that the final programme for this year’s Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin is now online. You can find it at <http://de.digitalclassicist.org/berlin/seminar2016> and below.

The seminar series will start on Oct. 18 with a keynote by Silvia Polla (TOPOI) entitled “Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey.”

Seminars take place on Tuesdays (starting at 17:00 c.t.) on a fortnightly basis at the TOPOI building Dahlem or at the DAI.

We would also like to draw your attention to the possibility for students to attend the seminar as part of their curriculum. The seminar is now part of the academic programme of the Freie Universität under the name “Digitale Methoden in den Altertumswissenschaften” (see the FU’s course catalog <http://www.fu-berlin.de/vv/de/lv/315967>).

The seminar is recognised with 5 credit points (ECTS): this requires the attendance of the seminars and a 15 minute poster presentation on one of the topics covered by the seminar series. The poster presentations can be either in English or German and will take place after the end of the seminars on 18.4.2017 in the TOPOI building Dahlem.

Programme

18.10.2016
Silvia Polla (TOPOI)
“Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey”

1.11.2016
Undine Lieberwirth & Axel Gering (TOPOI)
“3D GIS in archaeology – a micro-scale analysis”

15.11.2016
Duncan Keenan-Jones (Glasgow)
“Digital Experimental Archaeology: Hero of Alexandria and his Automata in CAD”

29.11.2016
Chiara Palladino & Tariq Youssef (Leipzig)
“iAligner: a tool for syntax-based intra-language text alignment”

13.12.2016
Christian Prager (Bonn)
“Of Codes, Glyphs and Kings: Tasks, Limits and Approaches in the Encoding of Classic Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions”

10.1.2017
Wolfgang Schmidle et al. (DAI)
“chronOntology: A time gazetteer with principles”

24.1.2017
Nathan Gibson (Vanderbilt)
“Toward a Cyberinfrastructure for Syriac Literature: Mapping a Text Corpus using TEI and RDF”

7.2.2017
Katherine Crawford (Southampton)
“In the Footsteps of the Gods: network approach to modeling Roman Religious Processions”

21.2.2017
Aline Deicke (Mainz)
“From E19 to MATCH and MERGE. Mapping the CIDOC CRM to graph databases as an environment for archaeological network research”

Book launch invitation: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange & Public Engagement

Friday, May 27th, 2016

We would like to invite you to a launch event on June 10th, with the Institute of Classical Studies and Ubiquity Press, for the recently published volume:

Bodard G. & Romanello M. 2016. Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange & Public Engagement. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/bat

A limited number of print copies of the book will be available to view and purchase, and several authors will be present to discuss their chapters and the work as a whole. Wine and refreshments will be provided.

18:00 Friday June 10, 2016
2nd floor lobby, south block, Senate House, Malet St, London WC1E 7HU
(Note this event follows the Digital Classicist seminar, 16:30 room 234, see digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2016.html)

Please also feel free to display or circulate the attached poster.

We hope to see many of you there!

Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

The School of Advanced Study, London sponsors an S T Lee Visiting Professorial Fellowship. This year it is held by Greg Crane, Humboldt Professor of the Humanities at the University of Leipzig. During May and June he will be lecturing and holding events around the UK on the theme Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age.

The opening event, Global Philology, will be take place at the ICS (Senate House, room 349) on 17th May, 5.30 and will be a round table discussion with Dr Imre Galambos (Cambridge), Professor Eleanor Robson (UCL), Dr Sarah Savant (Aga Khan University), Dr Michael Willis (British Museum) and will explore the question of what Classics can realistically mean in a century where China, India (with its six official Classical languages), and the various nations of the Arabic and Persian-speaking world play an active role in shaping global cultures. It will be followed by a reception.

All are welcome.

The full programme is listed below and also available at
http://www.icls.sas.ac.uk/events/greek-latin-and-digital-philology-global-age

*Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age*

Tuesday, May 17, 17:30-19:30, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 349: “Global Philology, Greco-Roman Studies, and Classics in the 21st Century,” round table with Imre Galambos, Eleanor Robson, Sarah Savant and Michael Willis.

Friday, May 20, 16:00-17:30, University of Glasgow: “Europe, Europeana and the Greco-Roman World.”

Monday, May 23, 13:00-14:00: Oxford University Faculty of Classics, first floor seminar room, Epigraphy Workshop: “What are the possibilities for epigraphic (and papyrological) sources in a digital age?”

Tuesday, May 24, 14:00-16:00, Oxford University: Seminar, Main lecture theatre, Faculty of Classics: “What would a smart edition look like and why should we care?”

Friday, May 27, 12:00-13:30, University of Manchester: Seminar, “Greek into Arabic, Arabic into Latin, and reinterpretation of what constitutes Western Civilization.”

Tuesday, June 1, 5.30-6.30, Durham University,seminar room, Dept. of Classics and Ancient History “Digital Philology and Greco-Roman Culture as the grand challenge of Reception Studies.”

Friday, June 3, 16:30-18:00, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 234: “Philological Education and Citizenship in the 21st Century.”

Queries to valerie.james@sas.ac.uk.

Workshop Digital Classics (Freiburg, Jun 30–Jul 1, 2016)

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

WORKSHOP: Digital Classics: Editing, Interpreting, Teaching
Thursday, 30th June 2016, and Friday, 1st July 2016.
Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Germany

This workshop, sponsored by the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, Germany, is part of the project “Der digital turn in den Altertumswissenschaften: Wahrnehmung – Dokumentation – Reflexion“ (Dr Stelios Chronopoulos, PD Dr Felix K Maier, Dr Anna Novokhatko).

Digital tools and technologies have led to significant changes in Classics during the past 10 to 15 years. Methods and scientific practice have been adjusted, both to adapt to the new environment and to open up novel possibilities. In the course of these transitions it is essential to discuss changes and consequences that will affect teaching, researching and publishing in Classics.

A conference, taking place from the 30th June to the 1st July, will address these questions: three groups of experts (organized in three panels) will discuss three major topics in Digital Classics. The first day of the conference will be internal work closed to public. The second day will be a public discussion where the results of each group will be presented. This discussion starts at 10.00am on Friday (1st July) and will end at 5.00pm (University of Freiburg, KGI 2004 and 3024, updates on www.texte-messen.uni-freiburg.de).

The three panels will be:

1) Digital Tools for Teaching Classics: Dr Marco Büchler (Göttingen), Dr Stefan Faller (Freiburg), Emily Franzini (Göttingen), Prof Dr Christian Mair (Freiburg), Prof Dr Peter von Moellendorff (Gießen)
2) Digital Editions – visualization, annotation, structuring: Dr Leif Isaksen (Lancaster), Prof Dr Donald Mastronarde (Berkeley), Jun Prof Dr Brigitte Mathiak (Cologne), Prof Dr Patrick Sahle (Cologne), Prof Dr Stefan Schorn (Leuven)
3) Open access and digital publishing: Georgios Chatzoudis (Düsseldorf), Prof Dr Marcus Deufert (Leipzig), Dr Niels Taubert (Bielefeld), Dr Lilian Landes (Munich), Dr Stefan von der Lahr (Munich)

In addition there will be a public panel discussion on Thursday (30th June) at 6.00pm on the consequences of open access in academia:
Roland Reuß (University of Heidelberg) and Hubertus Kohle (University of Munich).

For further information please contact
Felix.maier@geschichte.uni-freiburg.de

Classical Philology goes digital (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts

University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017
http://www.uni-potsdam.de/klassphil/workshop-classical-philology-goes-digital.html

Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods.
(more…)

Epigraphy Editathon, (April 20-22, 2016 – Leipzig)

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016

Epigraphy Editathon (Editing chronological and geographic data in ancient inscriptions)
April 20-22, 2016
Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities – University of Leipzig
Augustusplatz 10, 04109 Leipzig
P 402

April 20, 2016

Morning (paper presentations)
09:00-09:15: Monica Berti: Welcome and Introduction
09:15-09:45: Charlotte Roueché (King’s College London): Making the stones speak
09:45-10:15: Michèle Brunet (Université Lyon 2): IG Louvre: developments and issues – A case study
10:15-10:45: Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig): The Digital Marmor Parium
10:45-11:15: Coffee Break
11:15-11:45: Artemis Karnava (Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften): The Cypriot syllabary of the 1st mill. BC: yet another writing system for the Greek language
11:45-12:15: Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Berlin): Telling stories with the inscription. The EAGLE Storytelling App and beyond
12:15-13:00: Discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: DĀMOS – Database of Mycenean at Oslo (Federico Aurora, University of Oslo)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: Data and standards in the iDAI.world (Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank, DAI Berlin)
17:00-18:00: Editing inscriptions in Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 21, 2016

Morning (paper/projects presentations)
09:00-09:30: Silvia Orlandi (Università La Sapienza Roma): Chronological and geographical information in Latin inscriptions: examples and issues
09:30-10:00: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University): Treebanks and meter in 4th century Attic inscriptions
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:00: Chiara Palladino (Università di Bari / Leipzig Universität): Numbers, winds and stars: representing the ancient geographical language in the digital environment
11:00-11:30: Anita Rocco (Università di Bari): Remarks about time and places in the inscriptions by Christians in Rome
11:30-12:00: Martin Scholz (Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg): EDEN, An Epigraphic Web Database of Ancient Inscriptions
12:00-13:00: Gregory Crane (Tufts University / Universität Leipzig): Perseus and Leipzig developments and general discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: Classroom epigraphy assignments with Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu and Tim Buckingham, Tufts University)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: EDR – Epigraphic Database Roma (Silvia Evangelisti, Università di Foggia)
17:00-18:00: Pelagios (Rainer Simon, Austrian Institute of Technology)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 22, 2016

Morning (projects/standards presentations)
9:00-10:00: EAGLE Project (Pietro Liuzzo, Universität Heidelberg)
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:30: GODOT: Graph of Dated Objects and Texts (Frank Grieshaber, Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften and Universität Heidelberg)
11:30-12:30: Towards Guidelines for TEI encoding of text artefacts in Egyptology (Daniel Werning, Excellence Cluster Topoi, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)
12:30-13:00: Trismegistos Places: a geographical index for all Latin inscriptions (Herbert Verreth, Leuven University)

Afternoon
14:30-16:30: Round Table

UCLDH Seminar

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Details of the upcoming seminar in the UCLDH 2016 series follow:

The ancient cultures of Sumer, Assyria and Babylonia have left a rich written legacy, in the form of many hundreds of thousands of clay tablets, inscribed in the complex, wedge-shaped cuneiform script. Over the past two centuries these artefacts, dating from c.3000 BC to c.100 AD, have been excavated from archaeological sites across the Middle East, particularly Iraq and Syria, and are now housed in many different museums around the world.

For several decades now there has been a concerted effort to catalogue, photograph, edit and analyse these most precious witnesses of the first half of history. The editorial and analytical effort has been spearheaded by Oracc.org, the Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus, co-directed by Professor Eleanor Robson here at UCL, along with international colleagues.

On Wednesday 27th April 2016, Eleanor Robson, along with Raquel Alegre of RITS, will give a seminar presenting a new editorial interface they have been working on for Oracc, that will hopefully enable a significant number of less technophile colleagues to contribute to the project. They will explain what Oracc does and why it matters, why new software was needed, and how it improves the editorial experience.

All welcome and there will be drinks and discussion after the talk.
Please note that registration is required: https://ucldhseminarritsoracc.eventbrite.co.uk

Summer School in Digital Humanities (Sep 2016, Hissar, Bulgaria)

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

The Centre for Excellence in the Humanities to the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, organizes jointly with an international team of lecturers and researchers in the field of Digital Humanities a Summer School in Digital Humanities. The Summer School will take place between 05-10 September 2016 and is targeted at historians, archaeologists, classical scholars, philologists, museum and conservation workers, linguists, researchers in translation and reception studies, specialists in cultural heritage and cultural management, textual critics and other humanitarians with little to moderate skills in IT who would like to enhance their competences. The Summer School will provide four introductory modules on the following topics:

  • Text encoding and interchange by Gabriel Bodard, University of London, and Simona Stoyanova, King’s College London: TEI, EpiDoc XML (http://epidoc.sourceforge.net/), marking up of epigraphic monuments, authority lists, linked open data for toponymy and prosopography: SNAP:DRGN (http://snapdrgn.net/), Pelagios (http://pelagios-project.blogspot.bg/), Pleiades (http://pleiades.stoa.org/).
  • Text and image annotation and alignment by Simona Stoyanova, King’s College London, and Polina Yordanova, University of Sofia: SoSOL Perseids tools (http://perseids.org), Arethusa grammatical annotation and treebanking of texts, Alpheios text and translation alignment, text/image alignment tools.
  • Geographical Information Systems and Neogeography by Maria Baramova, University of Sofia, and Valeria Vitale, King’s College London: Historical GIS, interactive map layers with historical information, using GeoNames (http://www.geonames.org/) and geospatial data, Recogito tool for Pelagios.
  • 3D Imaging and Modelling for Cultural Heritage by Valeria Vitale, King’s College London: photogrammetry, digital modelling of indoor and outdoor objects of cultural heritage, Meshmixer (http://www.meshmixer.com/), Sketchup (http://www.sketchup.com/) and others.

The school is open for applications by MA and PhD students and postdoc and early researchers from all humanitarian disciplines, as well as employees in the field of cultural heritage. The applicants should send a CV and a Motivation statement clarifying their specific needs and expressing interest in one or more of the modules no later than 15.05.2016. The places are limited and you will be notified about your acceptance within 10 working days after the application deadline. Transfer from Sofia to Hissar and back, accommodation and meal expenses during the Summer School are covered by the organizers. Five scholarships of 250 euro will be accorded by the organizing committee to the participants whose work and motivation are deemed the most relevant and important.

The participation fee is 40 еurо. It covers coffee breaks, social programme and materials for the participants.

Please submit your applications to dimitar.illiev@gmail.com.

ORGANISING COMMITTEE
Assoc. Prof. Dimitar Birov (Department of Informatics, University of Sofia)
Dr. Maria Baramova (Department of Balkan History, University of Sofia)
Dr. Dimitar Iliev (Department of Classics, University of Sofia)
Mirela Hadjieva (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)
Dobromir Dobrev (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)
Kristina Ferdinandova (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 11-15, 2016

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 11-15, 2016. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (ICS), Simona Stoyanova (KCL) and Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg / Hamburg). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the online Papyrological Editor and Perseids platforms.

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek/Latin or other ancient language, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email pietro.liuzzo@zaw.uni-heidelberg.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by 6th March 2016. Please use as subject of your email “[EPIDOC LONDON 2016] application <yourname>”.