Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

CFP: Digital Textual Editions and Corpora

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

Digital Classics Association
Call for papers for the January 4-7, 2018 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Boston

“Digital Textual Editions and Corpora”

Organizer: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY ncoffee@buffalo.edu

The discovery, editing, and publication of classical texts has been a foundational activity in the study of antiquity. The creation of born-digital editions of classical texts and of digital textual corpora has led to a resurgence of interest in the curation and editing of texts, so that they can be made more broadly accessible online and enhanced with features only possible through digital representation. The aim of this panel is to inform the SCS membership and engage them in a discussion regarding the current state of the art in the curation and publication of digital editions and corpora, as well as likely future directions. Abstracts are invited in two complementary areas. Scholars with experience working with contemporary digital editions and corpora are invited to discuss their experience. This might involve creating a digital edition or corpus, or it might involve a research project that intensively engaged with one. Scholars who have set up digital corpora and/or editing environments, or who work on conventions or other software that underlie such corpora are invited to relate their experience as well. Papers can address completed work, but can also be devoted partly or entirely to ongoing work, problems, or challenges.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously in accordance with SCS regulations. Submitters should confirm in their emails that they are SCS members in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the SCS website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is March 1, 2017.

SCS website version: https://goo.gl/m21JQG

Digital Classicist London 2017 CFP

Monday, January 30th, 2017

The Digital Classicist London seminar invites proposals with a focus on the needs of users/readers, for the summer 2017 season, which will run on Friday afternoons in June and July in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London.

We welcome proposals in any area of classics, including ancient history, archaeology and reception, that employ digital or other innovative and collaborative approaches to the study of the ancient world (including cultures beyond the Mediterranean). Researchers of all levels, including students and professional practitioners, are welcome, and we expect a diverse audience of philologists and historians, information scientists and digital humanists, graduate students and interested members of the public.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a paper, please email an abstract of up to 500 words as an attachment to gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk by March 19th, 2017.

The seminar is organized by Gabriel Bodard, Simon Mahony, Eleanor Robson, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale. For full details, and previous years’ programmes, see http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2017.html

Classical Philology Goes Digital, University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Classical Philology Goes Digital. Working on Textual Phenomena of Ancient Texts
University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017

Organization: Karen Blaschka (Universität Potsdam) and Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig)
Funded by the Volkswagen Stiftung

Thursday, February 16, 2017
9.00
Welcome Address by the Vice Dean Prof. Dr. Johannes Haag
Opening (Monica Berti / Karen Blaschka)

I. DH-keynote-speakers (part I)
Chair: Neil Coffee (University at Buffalo)
9.30
Gregory R. Crane (Universität Leipzig/Tufts University), Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age
10:10
Franz Fischer (CCeH / IDE Köln), Digital Philology and the (cr)apparatus

10.50
Coffee Break

Chair: Gregory R. Crane (Universität Leipzig/Tufts University)
11:10
Francesco Mambrini (DAI, Berlin), The Syntax of Similes. A Treebank-based Exploration of Simile in Greek Poetry
11:50
Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig), Documenting Text Reuse of Greek Fragmentary Authors
12.30
Break for lunch

II. Project presentations (part I)
Chair: Karen Blaschka (Universität Potsdam)
13.30
Maria Vasiloudi, Carl W. Brunschön (Universität des Saarlandes/BBAW Berlin), Iatrosophia-digital: Die Rezeption antiker medizinischer Texte in griechischen Iatrosophia-Handschriften vom 13. bis 19. Jh.
Marie Revellio (Zukunftskolleg Universität Konstanz), Citation Practices in Jerome’s Letters as Vestigia of Late Antique Identit Construction
14.50
Coffee Break (more…)

EpiDoc training workshop, London, April 2017

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

We invite applications to participate in a training workshop on digital editing of papyrological and epigraphic texts, at the Institute of Classical Studies, London, April 3–7, 2017. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard and Lucia Vannini (ICS) and Simona Stoyanova (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc: Ancient Documents in XML

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the online Papyrological Editor tool.

The workshop will assume knowledge of papyrology or epigraphy; Greek, Latin or another ancient language; and the Leiden Conventions. No technical skills are required, and scholars of all levels, from students to professors, are welcome. To apply, please email gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk with a brief description of your background and reason for application, by February 14, 2017.

(Revised to bring back deadline for applications to Feb 14th.)

Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2016/17

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

We are delighted to announce that the final programme for this year’s Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin is now online. You can find it at <http://de.digitalclassicist.org/berlin/seminar2016> and below.

The seminar series will start on Oct. 18 with a keynote by Silvia Polla (TOPOI) entitled “Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey.”

Seminars take place on Tuesdays (starting at 17:00 c.t.) on a fortnightly basis at the TOPOI building Dahlem or at the DAI.

We would also like to draw your attention to the possibility for students to attend the seminar as part of their curriculum. The seminar is now part of the academic programme of the Freie Universität under the name “Digitale Methoden in den Altertumswissenschaften” (see the FU’s course catalog <http://www.fu-berlin.de/vv/de/lv/315967>).

The seminar is recognised with 5 credit points (ECTS): this requires the attendance of the seminars and a 15 minute poster presentation on one of the topics covered by the seminar series. The poster presentations can be either in English or German and will take place after the end of the seminars on 18.4.2017 in the TOPOI building Dahlem.

Programme

18.10.2016
Silvia Polla (TOPOI)
“Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey”

1.11.2016
Undine Lieberwirth & Axel Gering (TOPOI)
“3D GIS in archaeology – a micro-scale analysis”

15.11.2016
Duncan Keenan-Jones (Glasgow)
“Digital Experimental Archaeology: Hero of Alexandria and his Automata in CAD”

29.11.2016
Chiara Palladino & Tariq Youssef (Leipzig)
“iAligner: a tool for syntax-based intra-language text alignment”

13.12.2016
Christian Prager (Bonn)
“Of Codes, Glyphs and Kings: Tasks, Limits and Approaches in the Encoding of Classic Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions”

10.1.2017
Wolfgang Schmidle et al. (DAI)
“chronOntology: A time gazetteer with principles”

24.1.2017
Nathan Gibson (Vanderbilt)
“Toward a Cyberinfrastructure for Syriac Literature: Mapping a Text Corpus using TEI and RDF”

7.2.2017
Katherine Crawford (Southampton)
“In the Footsteps of the Gods: network approach to modeling Roman Religious Processions”

21.2.2017
Aline Deicke (Mainz)
“From E19 to MATCH and MERGE. Mapping the CIDOC CRM to graph databases as an environment for archaeological network research”

Book launch invitation: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange & Public Engagement

Friday, May 27th, 2016

We would like to invite you to a launch event on June 10th, with the Institute of Classical Studies and Ubiquity Press, for the recently published volume:

Bodard G. & Romanello M. 2016. Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange & Public Engagement. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/bat

A limited number of print copies of the book will be available to view and purchase, and several authors will be present to discuss their chapters and the work as a whole. Wine and refreshments will be provided.

18:00 Friday June 10, 2016
2nd floor lobby, south block, Senate House, Malet St, London WC1E 7HU
(Note this event follows the Digital Classicist seminar, 16:30 room 234, see digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2016.html)

Please also feel free to display or circulate the attached poster.

We hope to see many of you there!

Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

The School of Advanced Study, London sponsors an S T Lee Visiting Professorial Fellowship. This year it is held by Greg Crane, Humboldt Professor of the Humanities at the University of Leipzig. During May and June he will be lecturing and holding events around the UK on the theme Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age.

The opening event, Global Philology, will be take place at the ICS (Senate House, room 349) on 17th May, 5.30 and will be a round table discussion with Dr Imre Galambos (Cambridge), Professor Eleanor Robson (UCL), Dr Sarah Savant (Aga Khan University), Dr Michael Willis (British Museum) and will explore the question of what Classics can realistically mean in a century where China, India (with its six official Classical languages), and the various nations of the Arabic and Persian-speaking world play an active role in shaping global cultures. It will be followed by a reception.

All are welcome.

The full programme is listed below and also available at
http://www.icls.sas.ac.uk/events/greek-latin-and-digital-philology-global-age

*Greek, Latin and Digital Philology in a Global Age*

Tuesday, May 17, 17:30-19:30, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 349: “Global Philology, Greco-Roman Studies, and Classics in the 21st Century,” round table with Imre Galambos, Eleanor Robson, Sarah Savant and Michael Willis.

Friday, May 20, 16:00-17:30, University of Glasgow: “Europe, Europeana and the Greco-Roman World.”

Monday, May 23, 13:00-14:00: Oxford University Faculty of Classics, first floor seminar room, Epigraphy Workshop: “What are the possibilities for epigraphic (and papyrological) sources in a digital age?”

Tuesday, May 24, 14:00-16:00, Oxford University: Seminar, Main lecture theatre, Faculty of Classics: “What would a smart edition look like and why should we care?”

Friday, May 27, 12:00-13:30, University of Manchester: Seminar, “Greek into Arabic, Arabic into Latin, and reinterpretation of what constitutes Western Civilization.”

Tuesday, June 1, 5.30-6.30, Durham University,seminar room, Dept. of Classics and Ancient History “Digital Philology and Greco-Roman Culture as the grand challenge of Reception Studies.”

Friday, June 3, 16:30-18:00, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House 234: “Philological Education and Citizenship in the 21st Century.”

Queries to valerie.james@sas.ac.uk.

Workshop Digital Classics (Freiburg, Jun 30–Jul 1, 2016)

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

WORKSHOP: Digital Classics: Editing, Interpreting, Teaching
Thursday, 30th June 2016, and Friday, 1st July 2016.
Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg, Germany

This workshop, sponsored by the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, Germany, is part of the project “Der digital turn in den Altertumswissenschaften: Wahrnehmung – Dokumentation – Reflexion“ (Dr Stelios Chronopoulos, PD Dr Felix K Maier, Dr Anna Novokhatko).

Digital tools and technologies have led to significant changes in Classics during the past 10 to 15 years. Methods and scientific practice have been adjusted, both to adapt to the new environment and to open up novel possibilities. In the course of these transitions it is essential to discuss changes and consequences that will affect teaching, researching and publishing in Classics.

A conference, taking place from the 30th June to the 1st July, will address these questions: three groups of experts (organized in three panels) will discuss three major topics in Digital Classics. The first day of the conference will be internal work closed to public. The second day will be a public discussion where the results of each group will be presented. This discussion starts at 10.00am on Friday (1st July) and will end at 5.00pm (University of Freiburg, KGI 2004 and 3024, updates on www.texte-messen.uni-freiburg.de).

The three panels will be:

1) Digital Tools for Teaching Classics: Dr Marco Büchler (Göttingen), Dr Stefan Faller (Freiburg), Emily Franzini (Göttingen), Prof Dr Christian Mair (Freiburg), Prof Dr Peter von Moellendorff (Gießen)
2) Digital Editions – visualization, annotation, structuring: Dr Leif Isaksen (Lancaster), Prof Dr Donald Mastronarde (Berkeley), Jun Prof Dr Brigitte Mathiak (Cologne), Prof Dr Patrick Sahle (Cologne), Prof Dr Stefan Schorn (Leuven)
3) Open access and digital publishing: Georgios Chatzoudis (Düsseldorf), Prof Dr Marcus Deufert (Leipzig), Dr Niels Taubert (Bielefeld), Dr Lilian Landes (Munich), Dr Stefan von der Lahr (Munich)

In addition there will be a public panel discussion on Thursday (30th June) at 6.00pm on the consequences of open access in academia:
Roland Reuß (University of Heidelberg) and Hubertus Kohle (University of Munich).

For further information please contact
Felix.maier@geschichte.uni-freiburg.de

Classical Philology goes digital (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts

University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017
http://www.uni-potsdam.de/klassphil/workshop-classical-philology-goes-digital.html

Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods.
(more…)

Epigraphy Editathon, (April 20-22, 2016 – Leipzig)

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016

Epigraphy Editathon (Editing chronological and geographic data in ancient inscriptions)
April 20-22, 2016
Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities – University of Leipzig
Augustusplatz 10, 04109 Leipzig
P 402

April 20, 2016

Morning (paper presentations)
09:00-09:15: Monica Berti: Welcome and Introduction
09:15-09:45: Charlotte Roueché (King’s College London): Making the stones speak
09:45-10:15: Michèle Brunet (Université Lyon 2): IG Louvre: developments and issues – A case study
10:15-10:45: Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig): The Digital Marmor Parium
10:45-11:15: Coffee Break
11:15-11:45: Artemis Karnava (Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften): The Cypriot syllabary of the 1st mill. BC: yet another writing system for the Greek language
11:45-12:15: Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Berlin): Telling stories with the inscription. The EAGLE Storytelling App and beyond
12:15-13:00: Discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: DĀMOS – Database of Mycenean at Oslo (Federico Aurora, University of Oslo)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: Data and standards in the iDAI.world (Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank, DAI Berlin)
17:00-18:00: Editing inscriptions in Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 21, 2016

Morning (paper/projects presentations)
09:00-09:30: Silvia Orlandi (Università La Sapienza Roma): Chronological and geographical information in Latin inscriptions: examples and issues
09:30-10:00: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University): Treebanks and meter in 4th century Attic inscriptions
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:00: Chiara Palladino (Università di Bari / Leipzig Universität): Numbers, winds and stars: representing the ancient geographical language in the digital environment
11:00-11:30: Anita Rocco (Università di Bari): Remarks about time and places in the inscriptions by Christians in Rome
11:30-12:00: Martin Scholz (Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg): EDEN, An Epigraphic Web Database of Ancient Inscriptions
12:00-13:00: Gregory Crane (Tufts University / Universität Leipzig): Perseus and Leipzig developments and general discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: Classroom epigraphy assignments with Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu and Tim Buckingham, Tufts University)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: EDR – Epigraphic Database Roma (Silvia Evangelisti, Università di Foggia)
17:00-18:00: Pelagios (Rainer Simon, Austrian Institute of Technology)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 22, 2016

Morning (projects/standards presentations)
9:00-10:00: EAGLE Project (Pietro Liuzzo, Universität Heidelberg)
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:30: GODOT: Graph of Dated Objects and Texts (Frank Grieshaber, Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften and Universität Heidelberg)
11:30-12:30: Towards Guidelines for TEI encoding of text artefacts in Egyptology (Daniel Werning, Excellence Cluster Topoi, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)
12:30-13:00: Trismegistos Places: a geographical index for all Latin inscriptions (Herbert Verreth, Leuven University)

Afternoon
14:30-16:30: Round Table

UCLDH Seminar

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Details of the upcoming seminar in the UCLDH 2016 series follow:

The ancient cultures of Sumer, Assyria and Babylonia have left a rich written legacy, in the form of many hundreds of thousands of clay tablets, inscribed in the complex, wedge-shaped cuneiform script. Over the past two centuries these artefacts, dating from c.3000 BC to c.100 AD, have been excavated from archaeological sites across the Middle East, particularly Iraq and Syria, and are now housed in many different museums around the world.

For several decades now there has been a concerted effort to catalogue, photograph, edit and analyse these most precious witnesses of the first half of history. The editorial and analytical effort has been spearheaded by Oracc.org, the Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus, co-directed by Professor Eleanor Robson here at UCL, along with international colleagues.

On Wednesday 27th April 2016, Eleanor Robson, along with Raquel Alegre of RITS, will give a seminar presenting a new editorial interface they have been working on for Oracc, that will hopefully enable a significant number of less technophile colleagues to contribute to the project. They will explain what Oracc does and why it matters, why new software was needed, and how it improves the editorial experience.

All welcome and there will be drinks and discussion after the talk.
Please note that registration is required: https://ucldhseminarritsoracc.eventbrite.co.uk

Summer School in Digital Humanities (Sep 2016, Hissar, Bulgaria)

Thursday, March 3rd, 2016

The Centre for Excellence in the Humanities to the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, organizes jointly with an international team of lecturers and researchers in the field of Digital Humanities a Summer School in Digital Humanities. The Summer School will take place between 05-10 September 2016 and is targeted at historians, archaeologists, classical scholars, philologists, museum and conservation workers, linguists, researchers in translation and reception studies, specialists in cultural heritage and cultural management, textual critics and other humanitarians with little to moderate skills in IT who would like to enhance their competences. The Summer School will provide four introductory modules on the following topics:

  • Text encoding and interchange by Gabriel Bodard, University of London, and Simona Stoyanova, King’s College London: TEI, EpiDoc XML (http://epidoc.sourceforge.net/), marking up of epigraphic monuments, authority lists, linked open data for toponymy and prosopography: SNAP:DRGN (http://snapdrgn.net/), Pelagios (http://pelagios-project.blogspot.bg/), Pleiades (http://pleiades.stoa.org/).
  • Text and image annotation and alignment by Simona Stoyanova, King’s College London, and Polina Yordanova, University of Sofia: SoSOL Perseids tools (http://perseids.org), Arethusa grammatical annotation and treebanking of texts, Alpheios text and translation alignment, text/image alignment tools.
  • Geographical Information Systems and Neogeography by Maria Baramova, University of Sofia, and Valeria Vitale, King’s College London: Historical GIS, interactive map layers with historical information, using GeoNames (http://www.geonames.org/) and geospatial data, Recogito tool for Pelagios.
  • 3D Imaging and Modelling for Cultural Heritage by Valeria Vitale, King’s College London: photogrammetry, digital modelling of indoor and outdoor objects of cultural heritage, Meshmixer (http://www.meshmixer.com/), Sketchup (http://www.sketchup.com/) and others.

The school is open for applications by MA and PhD students and postdoc and early researchers from all humanitarian disciplines, as well as employees in the field of cultural heritage. The applicants should send a CV and a Motivation statement clarifying their specific needs and expressing interest in one or more of the modules no later than 15.05.2016. The places are limited and you will be notified about your acceptance within 10 working days after the application deadline. Transfer from Sofia to Hissar and back, accommodation and meal expenses during the Summer School are covered by the organizers. Five scholarships of 250 euro will be accorded by the organizing committee to the participants whose work and motivation are deemed the most relevant and important.

The participation fee is 40 еurо. It covers coffee breaks, social programme and materials for the participants.

Please submit your applications to dimitar.illiev@gmail.com.

ORGANISING COMMITTEE
Assoc. Prof. Dimitar Birov (Department of Informatics, University of Sofia)
Dr. Maria Baramova (Department of Balkan History, University of Sofia)
Dr. Dimitar Iliev (Department of Classics, University of Sofia)
Mirela Hadjieva (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)
Dobromir Dobrev (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)
Kristina Ferdinandova (Centre for Excellence in the Humanities, University of Sofia)

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 11-15, 2016

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 11-15, 2016. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (ICS), Simona Stoyanova (KCL) and Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg / Hamburg). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the online Papyrological Editor and Perseids platforms.

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek/Latin or other ancient language, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email pietro.liuzzo@zaw.uni-heidelberg.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by 6th March 2016. Please use as subject of your email “[EPIDOC LONDON 2016] application <yourname>”.

Unlocking the Digital Humanities (Tufts and Leipzig, Feb 29–May 2)

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016

Unlocking the Digital Humanities

http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x

An Open Research Series organized by the Tufts Department of Classics and by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig.

Talks will take place in Eaton Hall on the Medford Campus of Tufts University and in Paulinum 402 at the University of Leipzig. All talks will be broadcast as Google Hangouts and published on Youtube.

The URLs for the Google Hangouts and for the Youtube recordings will be posted at http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x.

Part 1. Introducing Digital Humanities

What is digital humanities? Why does it matter to you? All humanities disciplines welcome.

29 Feb, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Language, Digital Philology and the Humanities in a Global Society.

Gregory Crane, Winnick Family Chair and Professor of Classics, Tufts University; Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

2 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Digital Humanities: Everything you wanted to know but haven’t yet asked.

Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

7 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods.

Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig.

Melinda Johnston, prev. Cartoon Specialist, National Library of New Zealand

Part 2. Digital Humanities Showcase

Ask the experts! Hear and discuss use-cases of recent DH research and teaching.

10 Mar, 4:00-5:00pm, Eaton 123
Valid and Verified Undergraduate Research.
Christopher Blackwell, Forgione University Professor, Furman University
Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Assistant Professor, Tufts University

14 Mar, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
eLearning and Computational Language Research.
Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, Leipzig

4 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Rediscovery of Postclassical Latin and European Culture.
Neven Jovanovic, Associate Professor of Latin, University of Zagreb
Petra Sostaric, Lecturer, University of Zagreb

11 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Visualizing Literary and Historical Social Networks.
Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor of English, Northeastern University

11 Apr, 5:00-6:00pm, Eaton 123
From Archive to Corpus: Bottom-Up Bibliography for Millions of Books.
David A Smith, Assistant Professor College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University

25 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Spatial and Chronological Patterns in Historical Texts.
Maxim Romanov, Postdoctoral Researcher, Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

27 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Digital Art History.
Chiara Pidatella, Lecturer in Art History, Tufts

2 May, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Representing Influence: writing about text reuse when everything is online.
Ioannis Evrigenis, Professor of Political Science, Tufts University
Monica Berti, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

For information, contact Thomas Koentges (thomas.koentges@tufts.edu) at Tufts or Matt Munson (munson@dh.uni-leipzig.de) at Leipzig.

Old and new methods in the dating of early Christian papyri (San Antonio, Nov 19-22)

Friday, February 19th, 2016

The Archaeology of Religion in the Roman World group is organizing a panel on old and new methods in the dating of early Christian papyri at the next Annual Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature (San Antonio, Texas, 19-22 November 2016).

Topics may include, but are not confined to, methodology issues and problems, palaeography, papyrus case studies, and the application of new technologies.

Invited speakers: Brent Nongbri (Macquarie University) and Malcolm Choat (Macquarie University).

Instructions for submitting an abstract through this link: http://www.sbl-site.org/meetings/Congresses_CallForPaperDetails.aspx?MeetingId=29&VolunteerUnitId=49

Please feel free to email Roberta Mazza for enquiries.

CFP: Methodologies for social, cultural and demographic processes in migration

Tuesday, February 16th, 2016

Call for Papers: Methodologies to investigate social, cultural and demographic processes in migration periods.

EUROPEAN ASSOCIATION OF ARCHAEOLOGISTS. VILNIUS 31st August–4th September 2016.

The deadline is extended to 1st March!!

Topic – Interpreting the Archaeological Record

The “migration period” is characterized by movements of people coming from the fringes of the Roman Empire and settled on the Roman territories. Such period is poor of contemporary historical records, but rich of archaeological material. This has opened a long-lasting debate to have a view of the patterns of migrations, the impact of new peoples on the autochthonous populations, and the demographic processes occurred. The study of the early medieval period encourages a more direct comparison between different disciplines both in terms of methodology and result data.

In recent years, archaeology has considerably improved its interdisciplinary approach, integrating scientific evidence to construct a nuanced view of human patterns of migration and demographic models. The session offers a forum for the discussion of archaeological and scientific approaches to the study of past migrations and the dynamics of human interactions.

First, we invite papers dealing with the theme of migration in any time period, not necessarily medieval, which work comparatively across regions. Aim is to discuss current methodologies and results in the study of human past migrations.

Second, we invite researches that use recent scientific data, such as isotopes and DNA analysis, to investigate patterns of human migrations, interaction between migrants and autochthons, and reconstruction of demographic scenarios.

Lastly, we want to open the floor to discussion of future disciplinary aims in terms of data collection, management and presentation. We invite presentations on the management of diachronic and interregional data collected in datasets and maps, which possibly relates results from different disciplines and researchers.

Session organizers:

Author – Conselvan, Francesca, University of Vienna/Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Austria
Co-author(s) – Codromaz, Federica, Università degli studi di Trieste, Trieste, Italy
Co-author(s) – Innocenti, Dario, Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Venezia, Italy

You can see the complete Call for Papers here http://eaavilnius2016.lt/the-call-for-papers-and-posters/

Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage (May 30, 2016, Crete)

Monday, February 15th, 2016

Second International Workshop on Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage, SW4SH 2016

http://www.cepam.cnrs.fr/zoomathia/sw4sh/

Important dates:

  • Due date for paper submission: March 11, 2016
  • Notification of paper acceptance : April 1, 2016
  • Camera-ready version of accepted papers: April 15, 2016
  • Workshop: May 30, 2016

SW4SH 2016 will be held in conjunction with the 13th ESWC 2016 Conference which takes place between 29th May and 2nd June in Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

SW4SH 2016 is a continuation of the SW4SH workshop series initiated at ESWC 2015 which aims to provide a leading international and interdisciplinary forum for disseminating the latest research in the field of Semantic Web for the preservation and exploitation of our scientific heritage, the study of the history of ideas and their transmission.

Classicists and historians are interested in developing textual databases, in order to gather and explore large amounts of primary source materials. For a long time, they mainly focused on text digitization and markup. They only recently decided to try to explore the possibility of transferring some analytical processes they previously thought incompatible with automation to knowledge engineering systems, thus taking advantage of the growing set of tools and techniques based on the languages and standards of the semantic Web, such as linked data, ontologies, and automated reasoning. The iconographic data, which are also relevant in history of science and arise similar problematic could be addressed as well and offer suggestive insights for a global methodology for diverse media.

On the other hand, Semantic Web researchers are willing to take up more ambitious challenges than those arising in the native context of the Web in terms of anthropological complexity, addressing meta-semantic problems of flexible, pluralist or evolutionary ontologies, sources heterogeneity, hermeneutic and rhetoric dimensions. Thus the opportunity for a fruitful encounter of knowledge engineers with computer-savvy historians and classicists has come. This encounter may be inscribed within the more general context of digital humanities, a research area at the intersection of computing and the humanities disciplines which is gaining an ever-increasing momentum and where the Linked Open Data is playing an increasingly prominent role.

The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for discussion about the methodological approaches to the specificity of annotating “scientific” texts (in the wide sense of the term, including disciplines such as history, architecture, or rhetoric), and to support a collaborative reflection, on possible guidelines or specific models for building historical ontologies. The iconographic data, which are also relevant in history of science and arise similar problematic could be addressed as well and offer suggestive insights for a global methodology for diverse media. A key goal of the workshop, focusing on research issues related to pre-modern scientific texts, is to emphasize, through precise projects and up-to-date investigation in digital humanities, the benefit of a multidisciplinary research to create and operate on relevantly structured data. One of the main interests of the very topic of pre-modern historical data management lies in historical semantics, and the opportunity to jointly consider how to identify and express lexical, theoretical and material evolutions. Dealing with historical texts, a major problem is indeed to handle the discrepancy of the historical terminology compared to the modern one, and, in the case of massive, diachronic data, to take into account the contextual and theoretical meaning of terms and segments of texts and their semantics.

Topics covered by the workshop include but are not limited to:

  • Ontologies and vocabularies in Ancient Science
  • Semantic annotation of ancient and medieval scientific texts
  • Information/knowledge extraction from archaeological objects and texts
  • Semantic integration of heterogeneous and contradicting knowledge
  • Representation of the historical dimension of Scientific Knowledge
  • Impact of Semantic Web technologies on Digital Humanities
  • Knowledge Engineering for ancient zoological science and literature
  • Social Web, collaborative systems, tagging, and user feedback

Paper Submission:

We invite short position papers (4-6 pages) and regular research papers (8-12 pages) describing innovative ideas covering the topics of the workshop.

Submissions must be written in English and follow the LNCS guidelines. For details see the Springer LNCS Author Instructions page.
Papers must be submitted via Easychair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sw4sh2016 .

Accepted papers will be published in the CEUR workshop proceedings series.

Workshop organizers:

  • Isabelle Draelants, IRHT
  • Catherine Faron Zucker, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis
  • Alexandre Monnin, Inria
  • Arnaud Zucker, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis

Contact:

For any question, please contact the organizers via email: sw4sh2016@easychair.org

MicroPasts: Crowd and community fuelled archaeological research

Sunday, February 14th, 2016

UCL Centre for Digital Humanities seminar
Daniel Pett, ‘MicroPasts: Crowd and community fuelled archaeological research’.

When: Wednesday 24th February 17:30 – 19:00
Where: Arts and Humanities Common Room, G24, Foster Court, UCL, London, WC1E 6BT

This seminar, given by Daniel Pett (ICT Advisor at the British Museum), will focus on the AHRC funded MicroPasts project, a collaboration between the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, the British Museum and the public. This project had 3 strands of research, crowdsourcing, crowdfunding and 3D. Two aspects were extremely successful, one was not.

The MicroPasts project has looked at a wide range of periods, topics and institutions, working with the Petrie Museum, Mary Rose Museum and British Museum collections for instance, to produce open data, open source software and an open attitude. A demonstration of what can be achieved by a small team, using open source technology to work in tandem with an amazing contributing crowd will be made, with illustration provided by various 3D prints and models.

Speaker:
Daniel Pett joined the British Museum in 2003 after a career in telecommunications and Investment Banking. He is responsible for the delivery of the award-winning Portable Antiquities Scheme website and is currently running a wide array of digital public archaeology projects including the Day of Archaeology.

All welcome and there will be drinks and discussion after the talk. Please note that registration is required.

Open Data Day event: Open Data as Open Educational Resources

Friday, February 12th, 2016

The Open Education SIG at University College London are holding their inaugural event: Open Data as Open Educational Resources.

Open Data are freely licensed datasets produced by governments, international organisations and researchers that can be used as open educational resources to develop transversal, statistics and discipline related skills, encouraging collaborative and multidisciplinary work towards solving complex real life problems using the same raw materials scientists and policy makers use

The event will feature

Santiago Martín: University College London
Mor Rubistein: Open Knowledge International
Leo Havemann: Birkbeck, University of London
Dr Carla Bonina: University of Surrey
William Hammonds: Universities UK
Dr Fabrizio Scrollini: Latin American Open Data Initiative
Dr Tim Coughlan: Open University

When: Friday, 4 March 2016 from 14:00 to 17:00

Where: Medawar G01 Lankester Lecture Theatre: UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK

To book: Eventbrite Open Data Day Event

To learn more: Open Data as Open Educational Resources (PDF)

BL Labs roadshow at King’s Digital Laboratory

Friday, February 12th, 2016

BL Labs Roadshow Event: Experimenting with British Library’s Digital Content and Data for your research

King’s Digital Laboratory (KDL) is excited to announce we will be hosting a British Library Labs (BL Labs) roadshow event at King’s College London on 14 March, 2016. The roadshow is an opportunity for King’s staff and students to gain an overview of the British Library’s digital resources from the BL Labs team, and brainstorm ideas for research outputs and digital products. The workshop will showcase the British Library’s digital content and data, addressing some of the challenges and issues of working with it and how interesting and exciting projects from researchers, artists, and entrepreneurs have been developed via the annual British Library Labs Competition and Awards.

No technical ability is required and staff and students from all disciplines are warmly encouraged to attend. Guest speakers and both KDL and BL Labs staff will be present to help you explore your ideas, and develop them into project ideas and funding proposals.

When: Monday 14th March 2016, 1000-1630
Where: River Room (King’s College London, Strand)
Info: https://kdl-bl-labs-roadshow2016.eventbrite.co.uk

Programme

10:00  Registration and Coffee
10:30  Introduction and Overview of King’s Digital Lab (Dr. James Smithies, Director, King’s Digital Lab)
11:00  Getting Medieval, Getting Palaeography: Using DigiPal to Study Medieval Script and Image (Dr. Stewart Brookes, Research Associate, DDH)
11:30  Digital Research and Digitisation at the British Library (Rossitza Atanassova, Digital Curator at the British Library)
12:00  British Library Labs (Mahendra Mahey, Project Manager of British Library Labs)
12:20  Overview projects that have used British Library’s Digital Content and data (Ben O’Steen, Technical Lead of British Library Labs)
13:00  Lunch
14:00  News data at the British Library (Luke McKernan, Lead Curator News & Moving Image Collections, British Library)
14:30  Examination of British Library data and previous Labs ideas
14:45  Ideas Lab
16:00  Pitching ideas to the panel
16:30  Finish

Please note that capacity is limited. For further information and registration please follow this link: https://kdl-bl-labs-roadshow2016.eventbrite.co.uk

Messages and Media (Postgraduates in Ancient History, March 19, Newcastle)

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in Ancient History
‘Messages and Media’
19th March 2016.
Armstrong Building, Newcastle University.

We are very pleased to announce that Professor Richard Clay, newly appointed Professor of Digital Humanities at Newcastle University, has agreed to present our keynote. As an art historian, Richard has a wealth of experience in digital humanities and research on the history of various media. He has made documentaries for the BBC, including ‘The French Revolution: Tearing up History’ and ‘The Brief History of Graffiti’. We thought his expertise would bring our discussion of ‘Messages and Media’ to full fruition.

Further, registration for delegates is now open. Attendance is free, but we ask that you register your intent to attend so that we can gauge numbers for catering and conference materials. Tea/coffee and lunch will be provided for all delegates.

In order to register, please fill out this form: https://ampah2016.wordpress.com/registration/. If you experience any difficulties or problems with the form, or cannot access or use it for whatever reason, simply e-mail us at ampah2016@ncl.ac.uk. Thank you.

A programme will be circulated in due course.

We look forward to welcoming you in Newcastle.

Kind regards,

Lauren Emslie and Christopher Mowat

CFP Archives and Archaeology (Vilnius, Aug/Sep 2016)

Friday, February 5th, 2016

Call for Papers: Archives and Archaeology – sources from the past, tools for the future
Deadline: 15th of February 2016

European Association of Archaeologists Annual Congress, Vilnius, 31st August–4th September 2016.

Topic: Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology

Keywords: archives, collections, history of archaeology

In this session we are exploring theoretical and methodological approaches to archive-based studies as well as the conceptualization and use(s) of archives. The importance of archives for archaeological research and field practice is undisputed in present-day archaeology. Nevertheless archival sources are often neglected and/or underused. Archives are essential for historians of archaeology, but at the same time they are also invaluable for the everyday practice of archaeologists. The process of archiving is one of the most important features of archaeology and it has had a great influence on the professionalization of the discipline. However, various archival aspects are often overlooked. For example, it has been common practice to separate documents and artifact collections when archiving when they should in fact be included in the archives together as equally important archaeological data. This greatly impacts anyone who studies the past of a particular site, biography of an archaeologist or the history of archaeology in general. In addition, the archive can work as a resource connecting the past, present and future of our discipline. Archives can also provide a starting point for research projects. The starting point for this session is the broad definition of an archive: archaeological records including documents, finds and museum collections. We welcome papers from scholars working with historic as well as contemporary archival sources and we also encourage broad-based humanistic views and interdisciplinary perspectives on archives. By exploring the archive as a concept and by combining various types of archival materials, we can redefine the archive as a resource and gain a new perspective on archive-based research studies.

Organizers:
Author – Gustavsson, Anna, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden (Presenting author)
Co-author(s) – Mihajlović, Vladimir, Institute for Balkan Studies of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, Serbia
Co-author(s) – de Tomasi, Francesca, Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Storici, Naples, Italy
Topic – Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology

Link to the the session “Archives and Archaeology – sources from the past, tools for the future”: http://eaavilnius2016.lt/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/921.pdf

Link to the general theme: Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology: http://eaavilnius2016.lt/3-theoretical-and-methodological-perspectives-in-archaeology-th3/

Webinar: Online Approaches to Editing Greek Literature. The Philosophical Papyri

Friday, February 5th, 2016

Rodney Ast (University of Heidelberg) and Holger Essler (University of Würzburg), in cooperation with Heidelberg’s Center for Cultural Heritage, are offering in Summer Semester 2016 an online seminar on Greek literary papyri. Special emphasis will be placed on philosophical texts. Out of a total of 550 texts published so far, 45% were found at a single site, the Villa dei Papiri in Herculaneum, the remainder coming from various places in Egypt. Comparison of the two groups suggests itself and it will be greatly facilitated by the Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri (DCLP) (a bilateral project led by the University of Heidelberg and NYU, with the involvement of the University of Leuven, Duke University, and the University of Würzburg); it already contains 95% of the philosophical texts from Herculaneum. The seminar will focus on philosophical texts from Egypt preserved on papyrus only (for an example click here). Participants will use the DCLP for instruction and to create digital editions, but other databases and approaches will be discussed as well. In particular, we will explore questions of editorial decision-making and technique, transmission, paleography, and the socio-cultural context in which the texts were copied.

The course is free of charge and will take place Thursdays, 16:15–17:45, Central European Time. The first meeting will be the 14th of April and the last the 7th of July. The language of instruction is English, and good knowledge of Greek is required. Participants should already have a Skype account set up by the first session. Certificates will be issued upon successful completion of the class.

Those interested in taking part should send a statement of interest and CV to Michaela Böttner, boettner@uni-heidelberg.de, by March 4th. Questions about the course can be directed to Rodney Ast (ast@uni-heidelberg.de) and/or Holger Essler (holger.essler@uni-wuerzburg.de).

The number of participants will be kept to a maximum of 12.

Colloquium on Digital Visualisation in the Humanities, Reading, March 31st 2016

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Proposals are invited for presentations at a colloquium on digital visualisation (broadly conceived) at the University of Reading, UK, on March 31st, 2016, funded by the British Academy.

Digital visualisation – including, among much else, 3D modelling, digital mapping, and the visual presentation of complex information – is making substantial contributions to research, teaching, and outreach activity in many humanities disciplines. As digital tools become ever more affordable and accessible, there is scope for researchers and visualisation professionals from different backgrounds to learn from each other about their aims, findings, methods, and challenges.

Speakers include:

  • Prof. James E. Packer (Professor emeritus, Northwestern), author (with Gil Gorski) of a recent book on the digital reconstruction of the The Roman Forum
  • Tayfun Oner, creator of numerous digital reconstructions including Byzantium 1200.
  • The Altair4 studio whose reconstruction work in Rome and other sites will be familiar to many.

We are open to proposals from any humanities background, and indeed from colleagues in the museum and heritage sectors, on how digital technologies can be used to present visualisations of places, phenomena, data, or other material. The colloquium will be chaired by Dr Matthew Nicholls (Reading), who works on the 3D reconstruction of ancient Rome.

The intention is to allow people to present their own work, and to hear from a variety of disciplinary, methodological, and practical backgrounds. We hope that this will offer scope for mutual enrichment and useful discussion.

All welcome. Lunch provided. Travel expenses and accommodation can be provided for speakers.

This event is made possible by the generous support of the British Academy’s Rising Star Engagement Award scheme.

For further details see http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/virtual-rome/2016/01/15/digital-visualisation-colloquium/, or to reserve a place or make enquiries, contact Elisabeth Meijer (e.h.meijer@pgr.reading.ac.uk)

CFP: Open Access and Open Access in Archaeology (Vilnius)

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Open Access and Open Data in Archaeology: Following the ARIADNE thread

Author – Wright, Holly, Archaeology Data Service, York, United Kingdom
Co-author(s) – Richards, Julian, University of York, York, United Kingdom (Presenting author)
Co-author(s) – Siegmund, Frank, Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
Co-author(s) – Geser, Guntram, Salzburg Research, Salzburg, Austria

Topic – Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology

http://eaavilnius2016.lt/3-theoretical-and-methodological-perspectives-in-archaeology-th3/

Will the availability of open data change the nature of archaeological research and publication? Will it also impact the ways in which archaeologists engage with wider communities? The European Science Foundation and other leading European research-funders have declared their support for the “Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities”: a far-reaching restructuring of scientific publishing in favour of open access that will take place before the end of the current decade. In parallel, the infrastructure necessary for open data is being created and the political pressure to use it will increase. Many areas of the humanities in Europe, including archaeology, still find this a difficult step to take. At present, the majority of highly renowned journals continue to be published in the traditional way, and research data are still generally unpublished. At the same time, the early adopters of open access and open data are still battling with the problems of how to implement it in practice. The EC Infrastructures funded ARIADNE project is working to bring together archaeological research data from across Europe, for use and re-use in new research. There are challenges, such as raising awareness about the available data, integrating datasets produced by very different projects and methodologies and various technologies. There are GIS, databases, 3D data, scientific datasets and more, all produced in a variety of languages, and all requiring differing approaches.This session is sponsored by the ARIADNE project, follows on from Barriers and opportunities: Open Access and Open Data in Archaeology at EAA 2015, and will provide further updates and overviews relating to open access and open data. We welcome papers from researchers, projects and publishers working with this issue.