Archive for the ‘Call for papers’ Category

Classical Philology goes digital (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts

University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017
http://www.uni-potsdam.de/klassphil/workshop-classical-philology-goes-digital.html

Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods.
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Old and new methods in the dating of early Christian papyri (San Antonio, Nov 19-22)

Friday, February 19th, 2016

The Archaeology of Religion in the Roman World group is organizing a panel on old and new methods in the dating of early Christian papyri at the next Annual Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature (San Antonio, Texas, 19-22 November 2016).

Topics may include, but are not confined to, methodology issues and problems, palaeography, papyrus case studies, and the application of new technologies.

Invited speakers: Brent Nongbri (Macquarie University) and Malcolm Choat (Macquarie University).

Instructions for submitting an abstract through this link: http://www.sbl-site.org/meetings/Congresses_CallForPaperDetails.aspx?MeetingId=29&VolunteerUnitId=49

Please feel free to email Roberta Mazza for enquiries.

CFP: Methodologies for social, cultural and demographic processes in migration

Tuesday, February 16th, 2016

Call for Papers: Methodologies to investigate social, cultural and demographic processes in migration periods.

EUROPEAN ASSOCIATION OF ARCHAEOLOGISTS. VILNIUS 31st August–4th September 2016.

The deadline is extended to 1st March!!

Topic – Interpreting the Archaeological Record

The “migration period” is characterized by movements of people coming from the fringes of the Roman Empire and settled on the Roman territories. Such period is poor of contemporary historical records, but rich of archaeological material. This has opened a long-lasting debate to have a view of the patterns of migrations, the impact of new peoples on the autochthonous populations, and the demographic processes occurred. The study of the early medieval period encourages a more direct comparison between different disciplines both in terms of methodology and result data.

In recent years, archaeology has considerably improved its interdisciplinary approach, integrating scientific evidence to construct a nuanced view of human patterns of migration and demographic models. The session offers a forum for the discussion of archaeological and scientific approaches to the study of past migrations and the dynamics of human interactions.

First, we invite papers dealing with the theme of migration in any time period, not necessarily medieval, which work comparatively across regions. Aim is to discuss current methodologies and results in the study of human past migrations.

Second, we invite researches that use recent scientific data, such as isotopes and DNA analysis, to investigate patterns of human migrations, interaction between migrants and autochthons, and reconstruction of demographic scenarios.

Lastly, we want to open the floor to discussion of future disciplinary aims in terms of data collection, management and presentation. We invite presentations on the management of diachronic and interregional data collected in datasets and maps, which possibly relates results from different disciplines and researchers.

Session organizers:

Author – Conselvan, Francesca, University of Vienna/Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Austria
Co-author(s) – Codromaz, Federica, Università degli studi di Trieste, Trieste, Italy
Co-author(s) – Innocenti, Dario, Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Venezia, Italy

You can see the complete Call for Papers here http://eaavilnius2016.lt/the-call-for-papers-and-posters/

Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage (May 30, 2016, Crete)

Monday, February 15th, 2016

Second International Workshop on Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage, SW4SH 2016

http://www.cepam.cnrs.fr/zoomathia/sw4sh/

Important dates:

  • Due date for paper submission: March 11, 2016
  • Notification of paper acceptance : April 1, 2016
  • Camera-ready version of accepted papers: April 15, 2016
  • Workshop: May 30, 2016

SW4SH 2016 will be held in conjunction with the 13th ESWC 2016 Conference which takes place between 29th May and 2nd June in Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

SW4SH 2016 is a continuation of the SW4SH workshop series initiated at ESWC 2015 which aims to provide a leading international and interdisciplinary forum for disseminating the latest research in the field of Semantic Web for the preservation and exploitation of our scientific heritage, the study of the history of ideas and their transmission.

Classicists and historians are interested in developing textual databases, in order to gather and explore large amounts of primary source materials. For a long time, they mainly focused on text digitization and markup. They only recently decided to try to explore the possibility of transferring some analytical processes they previously thought incompatible with automation to knowledge engineering systems, thus taking advantage of the growing set of tools and techniques based on the languages and standards of the semantic Web, such as linked data, ontologies, and automated reasoning. The iconographic data, which are also relevant in history of science and arise similar problematic could be addressed as well and offer suggestive insights for a global methodology for diverse media.

On the other hand, Semantic Web researchers are willing to take up more ambitious challenges than those arising in the native context of the Web in terms of anthropological complexity, addressing meta-semantic problems of flexible, pluralist or evolutionary ontologies, sources heterogeneity, hermeneutic and rhetoric dimensions. Thus the opportunity for a fruitful encounter of knowledge engineers with computer-savvy historians and classicists has come. This encounter may be inscribed within the more general context of digital humanities, a research area at the intersection of computing and the humanities disciplines which is gaining an ever-increasing momentum and where the Linked Open Data is playing an increasingly prominent role.

The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for discussion about the methodological approaches to the specificity of annotating “scientific” texts (in the wide sense of the term, including disciplines such as history, architecture, or rhetoric), and to support a collaborative reflection, on possible guidelines or specific models for building historical ontologies. The iconographic data, which are also relevant in history of science and arise similar problematic could be addressed as well and offer suggestive insights for a global methodology for diverse media. A key goal of the workshop, focusing on research issues related to pre-modern scientific texts, is to emphasize, through precise projects and up-to-date investigation in digital humanities, the benefit of a multidisciplinary research to create and operate on relevantly structured data. One of the main interests of the very topic of pre-modern historical data management lies in historical semantics, and the opportunity to jointly consider how to identify and express lexical, theoretical and material evolutions. Dealing with historical texts, a major problem is indeed to handle the discrepancy of the historical terminology compared to the modern one, and, in the case of massive, diachronic data, to take into account the contextual and theoretical meaning of terms and segments of texts and their semantics.

Topics covered by the workshop include but are not limited to:

  • Ontologies and vocabularies in Ancient Science
  • Semantic annotation of ancient and medieval scientific texts
  • Information/knowledge extraction from archaeological objects and texts
  • Semantic integration of heterogeneous and contradicting knowledge
  • Representation of the historical dimension of Scientific Knowledge
  • Impact of Semantic Web technologies on Digital Humanities
  • Knowledge Engineering for ancient zoological science and literature
  • Social Web, collaborative systems, tagging, and user feedback

Paper Submission:

We invite short position papers (4-6 pages) and regular research papers (8-12 pages) describing innovative ideas covering the topics of the workshop.

Submissions must be written in English and follow the LNCS guidelines. For details see the Springer LNCS Author Instructions page.
Papers must be submitted via Easychair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sw4sh2016 .

Accepted papers will be published in the CEUR workshop proceedings series.

Workshop organizers:

  • Isabelle Draelants, IRHT
  • Catherine Faron Zucker, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis
  • Alexandre Monnin, Inria
  • Arnaud Zucker, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis

Contact:

For any question, please contact the organizers via email: sw4sh2016@easychair.org

CFP Archives and Archaeology (Vilnius, Aug/Sep 2016)

Friday, February 5th, 2016

Call for Papers: Archives and Archaeology – sources from the past, tools for the future
Deadline: 15th of February 2016

European Association of Archaeologists Annual Congress, Vilnius, 31st August–4th September 2016.

Topic: Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology

Keywords: archives, collections, history of archaeology

In this session we are exploring theoretical and methodological approaches to archive-based studies as well as the conceptualization and use(s) of archives. The importance of archives for archaeological research and field practice is undisputed in present-day archaeology. Nevertheless archival sources are often neglected and/or underused. Archives are essential for historians of archaeology, but at the same time they are also invaluable for the everyday practice of archaeologists. The process of archiving is one of the most important features of archaeology and it has had a great influence on the professionalization of the discipline. However, various archival aspects are often overlooked. For example, it has been common practice to separate documents and artifact collections when archiving when they should in fact be included in the archives together as equally important archaeological data. This greatly impacts anyone who studies the past of a particular site, biography of an archaeologist or the history of archaeology in general. In addition, the archive can work as a resource connecting the past, present and future of our discipline. Archives can also provide a starting point for research projects. The starting point for this session is the broad definition of an archive: archaeological records including documents, finds and museum collections. We welcome papers from scholars working with historic as well as contemporary archival sources and we also encourage broad-based humanistic views and interdisciplinary perspectives on archives. By exploring the archive as a concept and by combining various types of archival materials, we can redefine the archive as a resource and gain a new perspective on archive-based research studies.

Organizers:
Author – Gustavsson, Anna, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden (Presenting author)
Co-author(s) – Mihajlović, Vladimir, Institute for Balkan Studies of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, Serbia
Co-author(s) – de Tomasi, Francesca, Istituto Italiano per gli Studi Storici, Naples, Italy
Topic – Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology

Link to the the session “Archives and Archaeology – sources from the past, tools for the future”: http://eaavilnius2016.lt/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/921.pdf

Link to the general theme: Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology: http://eaavilnius2016.lt/3-theoretical-and-methodological-perspectives-in-archaeology-th3/

Colloquium on Digital Visualisation in the Humanities, Reading, March 31st 2016

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Proposals are invited for presentations at a colloquium on digital visualisation (broadly conceived) at the University of Reading, UK, on March 31st, 2016, funded by the British Academy.

Digital visualisation – including, among much else, 3D modelling, digital mapping, and the visual presentation of complex information – is making substantial contributions to research, teaching, and outreach activity in many humanities disciplines. As digital tools become ever more affordable and accessible, there is scope for researchers and visualisation professionals from different backgrounds to learn from each other about their aims, findings, methods, and challenges.

Speakers include:

  • Prof. James E. Packer (Professor emeritus, Northwestern), author (with Gil Gorski) of a recent book on the digital reconstruction of the The Roman Forum
  • Tayfun Oner, creator of numerous digital reconstructions including Byzantium 1200.
  • The Altair4 studio whose reconstruction work in Rome and other sites will be familiar to many.

We are open to proposals from any humanities background, and indeed from colleagues in the museum and heritage sectors, on how digital technologies can be used to present visualisations of places, phenomena, data, or other material. The colloquium will be chaired by Dr Matthew Nicholls (Reading), who works on the 3D reconstruction of ancient Rome.

The intention is to allow people to present their own work, and to hear from a variety of disciplinary, methodological, and practical backgrounds. We hope that this will offer scope for mutual enrichment and useful discussion.

All welcome. Lunch provided. Travel expenses and accommodation can be provided for speakers.

This event is made possible by the generous support of the British Academy’s Rising Star Engagement Award scheme.

For further details see http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/virtual-rome/2016/01/15/digital-visualisation-colloquium/, or to reserve a place or make enquiries, contact Elisabeth Meijer (e.h.meijer@pgr.reading.ac.uk)

CFP: Open Access and Open Access in Archaeology (Vilnius)

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Open Access and Open Data in Archaeology: Following the ARIADNE thread

Author – Wright, Holly, Archaeology Data Service, York, United Kingdom
Co-author(s) – Richards, Julian, University of York, York, United Kingdom (Presenting author)
Co-author(s) – Siegmund, Frank, Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany
Co-author(s) – Geser, Guntram, Salzburg Research, Salzburg, Austria

Topic – Theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology

http://eaavilnius2016.lt/3-theoretical-and-methodological-perspectives-in-archaeology-th3/

Will the availability of open data change the nature of archaeological research and publication? Will it also impact the ways in which archaeologists engage with wider communities? The European Science Foundation and other leading European research-funders have declared their support for the “Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities”: a far-reaching restructuring of scientific publishing in favour of open access that will take place before the end of the current decade. In parallel, the infrastructure necessary for open data is being created and the political pressure to use it will increase. Many areas of the humanities in Europe, including archaeology, still find this a difficult step to take. At present, the majority of highly renowned journals continue to be published in the traditional way, and research data are still generally unpublished. At the same time, the early adopters of open access and open data are still battling with the problems of how to implement it in practice. The EC Infrastructures funded ARIADNE project is working to bring together archaeological research data from across Europe, for use and re-use in new research. There are challenges, such as raising awareness about the available data, integrating datasets produced by very different projects and methodologies and various technologies. There are GIS, databases, 3D data, scientific datasets and more, all produced in a variety of languages, and all requiring differing approaches.This session is sponsored by the ARIADNE project, follows on from Barriers and opportunities: Open Access and Open Data in Archaeology at EAA 2015, and will provide further updates and overviews relating to open access and open data. We welcome papers from researchers, projects and publishers working with this issue.

CFP, People of the Ancient World (Cluj-Napoca, October 2016)

Monday, January 18th, 2016

Call for papers: People of the Ancient World
International Conference
Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, 13–15 October 2016

Population studies for the Ancient World have always been an appealing research field. From demographic reconstructions to onomastical researches and from networks analyses to prosopography and familial micro-history, ancient people are a constant and continuous source of inspiration.Today, more than ever, by employing digital methods and online resources, the study of ancient people is evolving greatly, in new and exciting directions.

As part of the project Romans 1by1, the Centre for Roman Studies of the University of Cluj-Napoca organizes a 3-day conference focused on the population(s) of the ancient world. Our aim is tobring together scholars interested in the research of ancient population froma variety of fields, dealing with the matter from different perspectives. We support any subject related to ancient population and encourage all approaches, inviting proposals for an inter-disciplinary conference. Although our focus will be on the Graeco-Roman world, our interest is not restricted to this area.

We are especially, but not exclusively, interested in:

  1. Theories and methodologies of population research for the ancient world
  2. Onomastics, naming practices and name interpretation
  3. Network studies and groups’ reconstruction
  4. Differences in the research of the elites and the non-elites. Work and labour in the ancient world
  5. Ancient population databases: present work, future directions
  6. Social interaction between the local population and foreigners

Abstracts (max. 300 words) for 15-20 minutes presentations can be submitted at the conference address, romans1by1@gmail.com, until 15th of June2016. Notification of acceptance will be given by1st of July 2016. We strongly encourage submissions from post-graduate and post-doctoral researchers.

The official language of the conference will be English, but in special cases
we can also accept presentations in other languages.

For further information, please use the same address: romans1by1@gmail.com.

Call for Papers: 2016 Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities has established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities and Social Sciences, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Monday from April 11th until early July 2016 in the form of 90-minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists. Furthermore, we proudly announce that Prof. Dr. Stefan Gradmann (KU Leuven) will be giving the opening keynote on April 11th.

We invite submissions of abstracts describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the humanities, both in the past and present. We also encourage contributions describing ‘work-in-progress’. Themes may include – but are not limited to –  text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, lexical and conceptual resources for DH, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data.

For more information please visit: http://etrap.gcdh.de/call-for-papers-2016-gottingen-dialog-in-digital-humanities/

Open Call for Papers: Digital Approaches and the Ancient World

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

Digital Approaches and the Ancient World
A themed issue of the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies

Editors:
Gabriel Bodard (University of London) gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk
Yanne Broux (KU Leuven) yanne.broux@arts.kuleuven.be
Ségolène Tarte (University of Oxford) segolene.tarte@oerc.ox.ac.uk

Call for papers:

We invite colleagues all around the world and at all stages of their careers to submit papers on the topic of “Digital Approaches and the Ancient World” to a themed issue of the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies. The topic is to be construed as widely as possible, to include not only the history, archaeology, language, literature and thought of the ancient and late antique Mediterranean world, but also of antiquity more widely, potentially including, for example, South and East Asian, Sub-Saharan African or Pre-Columbian American history. Digital approaches may also vary widely, to include methodologies from the digital humanities and information studies, quantitative methods from the hard sciences, or other innovative and transdisciplinary themes.

Papers will be fully peer reviewed and selected for inclusion based not only on their research quality and significance, but especially on their ability to engage profoundly both with classics/history academic readers, and scholars from digital or informatic disciplines. We are keen to see papers that clearly lay out their disciplinary and interdisciplinary methodological approaches, and present and interpret the full range of scholarly and practical outcomes of their research.

We encourage the use of and direct reference to open online datasets in your papers. BICS is not currently an open access publication, but self-archiving of pre-press papers is permitted, and the editors believe in the transparency and accountability that comes with basing scientific work on open data.

To submit an article to this themed issue, please send your full paper of 4,000–8,000 words in Microsoft Word doc, docx or rtf format, to <gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk>, along with a 150 word abstract, by January 31, 2016. You do not need to follow BICS style for the initial submission, but please note that the final version of accepted articles will need to be formatted to adhere to our style guide (http://www.icls.sas.ac.uk/sites/default/files/files/STYLE-V15.pdf).

If you have any questions about this issue, please feel free to contact any of the editors informally.

CfP: Computer-Aided Processing of Intertextuality in Ancient Languages

Friday, October 16th, 2015

Call for Contribution: Special Issue on Computer-Aided Processing of Intertextuality in Ancient Languages

“Europe’s future is digital”. This was the headline of a speech given at the Hannover exhibition in April 2015 by Günther Oettinger, EU-Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society. While businesses and industries have already made major advances in digital ecosystems, the digital transformation of texts stretching over a period of more than two millennia is far from complete. On the one hand, mass digitisation leads to an “information overload” of digitally available data; on the other, the “information poverty” embodied by the loss of books and the fragmentary state of ancient texts form an incomplete and biased view of our past. In a digital ecosystem, this coexistence of data overload and poverty adds considerable complexity to scholarly research.

With this special issue on Computer-Aided Processing of Intertextuality in Ancient Languages, the HiSoMA lab in Lyon,
France, and the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities in Germany, aim to create a collection of papers that discuss the state-of-the-art on intertextuality, linguistic preprocessing and the preservation of scholarly research results specifically applied to corpora in ancient languages and for which few online resources exist (Ancient Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Syriac, Coptic, Arabic, Ethiopic, etc.).

Relevant topics include:

  • Methods for the detection of intertexts and text reuse, manual (e.g. crowd-sourcing) or automatic (e.g. algorithms);
  • Infrastructure for the preservation of digital texts and quotations between different text passages; Linguistic preprocessing and data normalisation, such as lemmatisation of historical languages, root stemming, normalisation of variants, etc.;
  • Visualisation of intertextuality and text reuse;
  • Creation of, and research on, stemmata.

The special issue will be published by the Journal on Data Mining and Digital Humanities (http://jdmdh.episciences.org/), an online open access journal that will release the issue shortly after its submission in order to elicit feedback from readers while concurrently supervising the standard peer review process.

Interested authors are asked to:

  1. send a title, an author list and a one page (or shorter) abstract specifying the type of contribution (full paper or project presentation) to Laurence Mellerin [laurence.mellerin(at)mom(dot)fr] and Marco Büchler [mbuechler(at)gcdh(dot)de] by October 31st.
  2. send a paper (long: up to 40 pages OR short: 2 to 4 pages illustrating the scope and research of the project), following the guidelines of JDMDH by January 31st 2016.

For further questions, do not hesitate to contact Laurence and Marco.

CfP: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities (GDDH) has established a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Social Science, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Tuesday at 5pm from late April until early July 2015 in the form of 90 minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists.

We invite submissions of complete papers describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the Humanities, both in the past and present. Themes may include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based
modelling, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data. Papers should be written in English. Successful papers will be submitted for publication as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). Furthermore, the author(s) of the best paper will receive a prize of €500, which will be awarded on the basis of both the quality and the delivery of the paper.

A small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Full papers should be sent by March 20th to gkraft@gcdh.de in Word .docx format. There is no limitation in length but the suggested minimum is 5000 words. The full programme, including the venue of the dialogs, will be sent to you by April 1st.

For any questions, do not hesitate to contact gkraft@gcdh.de
For further information and updates, visit http://www.gcdh.de/en/events/gottingen-dialog-digital-humanities/

GDDH Board (in alphabetical order):

Camilla Di Biase-Dyson (Georg August University Göttingen)
Marco Büchler (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jens Dierkes (Göttingen eResearch Alliance)
Emily Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Greta Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Angelo Mario Del Grosso (ILC-CNR, Pisa, Italy)
Berenike Herrmann (Georg August University Göttingen)
Péter Király (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Gabriele Kraft (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Bärbel Kröger (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Maria Moritz (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Sarah Bowen Savant (Aga Khan University, London, UK)
Oliver Schmitt (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Sree Ganesh Thotempudi (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jörg Wettlaufer (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities & Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Ulrike Wuttke (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

This event is financially supported by the German Ministry of Education and Research (No. 01UG1509).

Digital Classicist London 2015 CFP

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Hugh Bowden, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

Humanités numériques: l’exemple de l’Antiquité (Grenoble, Sept 2-4, 2015)

Friday, November 28th, 2014

(Version française dessous)

The University ‘Stendhal’ of Grenoble 3, the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme-Alpes, L’Université Grenoble 2, the Humboldt Chair for Digital Humanities and HISOMA  organise the conference “Digital Humanities: the example of Antiquity”. The conference will take place in Grenoble, from the 2nd to the 4th of September 2015.

The goal of this conference is twofold: at the same time an assessment of existing methodologies and a looking forward to new ones. It also has the objective of evaluating current practices of the application of Digital Humanities to the study of antiquity, practices which are quite numerous but also sometimes disconnected from each other and without an overall understanding. The conference also aims to contribute toward the design of new projects and the opening new paths, by establishing a dialogue between scholars for whom the Digital Humanities are already familiar and those wishing to acquire knowledge and practice in this domain.
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Conference: Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations of History (Gothenburg, March 19-21 2015)

Friday, October 24th, 2014

Reposted from Critical Heritage Studies blog (thanks to Anna Foka):

March 19-21 2015, Gothenburg. Deadline for abstracts November 20, 2014

Full call here

A Critical Approach to Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations for History and Culture.

A conference for scholars and practitioners who study the implementation and potential of visual and multi-sensory representations to challenge and diversify our common understanding of history and culture.

Abstracts for research papers, posters, visual and multi-sensory demonstrations of ongoing projects, workshops, panels, and organised sessions on the conference themes will be accepted until November 20, 2014.

www.challengethepast.com

challengethepast@gu.se

Supporting partners:
Critical Heritage Studies (University of Gothenburg) //  HUMlab (Umeå University) // Visual Arena // Malmö Museer

Stage d’ecdotique. 16-20 février 2015

Monday, October 13th, 2014

Posted for Guillaime Bady:

Chères/chers collègues,
Je vous annonce que le prochain stage d’ecdotique des Sources Chrétiennes aura lieu du 16 au 20 février 2015, avec une initiation à la paléographie le 15 février, et une table-ronde le 19 février, à laquelle je vous invite chaleureusement à participer.

Vous trouverez en pièce jointe l’affiche du stage (le programme n’est pas encore disponible).

Pour une présentation du stage:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/formation/stage-ecdotique-stage-2015

Formulaire de préinscription:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/webform/preinscription-stage-ecdotique-2015

Appel à contribution pour la Table-ronde:
http://ecdotique.hypotheses.org/544

En espérant que les dates retenues, choisies en fonction des disponibilités des intervenants, seront opportunes, d’avance je vous remercie pour la publicité que vous pourrez faire à cette annonce.

Avec mes plus cordiales salutations,

Guillaume Bady

Chercheur CNRS à HiSoMA-Sources Chrétiennes (UMR 5189)
22 rue Sala
69002 Lyon

CFP: Seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

The Digital Latin Library, a joint project of the Society for Classical Studies, the Medieval Academy of America, and the Renaissance Society of America, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, announces a seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age. The seminar will take place on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, the DLL’s host institution, on June 25–26, 2015.

We welcome proposals for papers on all subjects related to the intersection of modern technology with traditional methods for editing Latin texts of all eras. Suggested topics:

  • Keeping the “critical” in digital critical editions
  • The scholarly value of editing texts to be read by humans and machines
  • Extending the usability of critical editions beyond a scholarly audience
  • Visualizing the critical apparatus: moving beyond a print-optimized format
  • Encoding different critical approaches to a text
  • Interoperability between critical editions and other digital resources
  • Dreaming big: a wishlist of features for the optimal digital editing environment

Of particular interest are proposals that examine the scholarly element of preparing a digital edition.

The seminar will be limited to ten participants. Participants will receive a stipend, and all travel and related expenses will be paid by the DLL.

Please send proposals of no more than 650 words to Samuel J. Huskey at dll-seminar@ou.edu by December 1, 2014. Notification of proposal status will be sent in early January.

Artistic practice and language learning, Grenoble, Jan 28-30, 2015

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Call for papers

International symposium, within the context of
ARC 5 – Cultures, Sciences, Sociétés et Médiations
Rhône-Alpes Region (France)
Operation Fabula agitur !

Fabula agitur !
Theatrical and artistic practices, oracy, and the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures
History, Aesthetics, Didactics

Grenoble University (France), January 28-30, 2015

In recent years, specialists in language instruction have paid much attention to the contribution of theatrical practices – and, more broadly speaking, of artistic practices – to the learning of modern languages. This symposium intends to look into a body of work that has so far been neglected: artistic practices used as a way to teach Ancient Languages, whether at school, college, or in local associations, in France and abroad.

For a long time now, however, there have been many examples of such practices. The Educational Theatre of Jesuit colleges, used from the sixteenth century onwards, is one of the most famous examples. Indeed, this type of practice is remarkable because of its wide audience as well as its ‘holistic’ educational approach. Nowadays, Ancient Language teachers may organize Olympiades, tiny drama workshops, unpolished performances or even erudite pageants to provide their pupils with a different approach to Ancient Languages and Cultures. Thanks to the stage, acting and oracy, this approach may be more physical and more emotional than those they are used to encountering in the classroom, in terms of what the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) calls “knowledge”, “skills” and “existential competences” (three macro-categories that apply to each form of learning).

The symposium will be held at Stendhal University – Grenoble III (France) from January 28 to January 30, 2015. Conference participants will be offered short training sessions on Ancient Language theatre as well as two theatrical performances which will clearly display the benefits of artistic practices for the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures.

Communication and workshop proposals should be sent to Malika Bastin-Hammou (Malika.Bastin@u-grenoble3.fr) and Filippo Fonio (Filippo.Fonio@u-grenoble3.fr) before July 01, 2014. They should be written as a presentation, and not exceed 1,500 characters. Scientific committee decisions will be made available on October 01, 2014 at the latest.

Appel à communication-Fabula agitur (PDF: French & English)

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, March 10th, 2014

We have had requests for a few days’ extension to the deadline for abstracts and consider it only fair to extend that to everyone. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014

See earlier CFP for full details.

CFP: Making Meaning from Data

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Abstracts are invited for the Digital Classics Association colloquium at SCS / AIA Annual Meetings in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 8-11, 2015.

[[ reposted from http://apaclassics.org/annual-meeting/146/cfp-making-meaning-data ]]

Sponsored by the Digital Classics Association
Organizers: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri Kansas-City

Digital techniques hold the promise of providing a consistent and comprehensive basis for the interpretation of classical culture, yet they also raise significant questions of method. Do digital approaches lead us away from certain kinds of interpretation and toward others? How does the quantitative and aggregate nature of argumentation common to digital humanities relate to other modes of understanding the ancient world? Papers are invited for this session that reflect theoretically on the study and understanding of classical antiquity in light of the growing importance of digital methods. Participants may take as their object material any aspect of classical culture, including, but not limited to: history, language, literature, material and visual culture, and philosophy.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously by three readers in accordance with APA regulations. In your email, please confirm that you are an APA member in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the APA website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 5 p.m. Eastern Time, February 3, 2014.

Contact: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY, ncoffee@buffalo.edu

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, January 6th, 2014

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014. (Note new deadline.)

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: www.digitalclassicist.org/wip

Publishing Text for a Digital Age

Friday, December 6th, 2013

March 27-30, 2014
Tufts University
Medford MA
perseus_neh (at) tufts.edu
http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/2014-workshop/

Call for contributions!

As a follow-on to Working with Text in a Digital Age, an NEH-funded Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities and in collaboration with the Open Philology Project at the University of Leipzig, Tufts University announces a two-day workshop on publishing textual data that is available under an open license, that is structured for machine analysis as well as human inspection, and that is in a format that can be preserved over time. The purpose of this workshop is to establish specific guidelines for digital publications that publish and/or annotate textual sources from the human record. The registration for the workshop will be free but space will be limited. Some support for travel and expenses will be available. We particularly encourage contributions from students and early-career researchers.

Textual data can include digital versions of traditional critical editions and translations but such data also includes annotations that make traditional tasks (such as looking up or quoting a primary source) machine-actionable, annotations that may build upon print antecedents (e.g., dynamic indexes of places that can be used to generate maps and geospatial visualizations), and annotations that are only feasible in a digital space (such as alignments between source text and translation or exhaustive markup of morphology, syntax, and other linguistic features).

Contributions can be of two kinds:

  1. Collections of textual data that conform to existing guidelines listed below. These collections must include a narrative description of their contents, how they were produced and what audiences and purposes they were designed to serve.
  2. Contributions about formats for publication. These contributions must contain sufficient data to illustrate their advantages and to allow third parties to develop new materials.

All textual data must be submitted under a Creative Commons license. Where documents reflect a particular point of view by a particular author and where the original expression should for that reason not be changed, they may be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All other contributions must be distributed under a CC-BY-SA license. Most publications may contain data represented under both categories: the introduction to an edition or a data set, reflecting the reasons why one or more authors made a particular set of decisions, can be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All data sets (such as geospatial annotation, morphosyntactic analyses, reconstructed texts with textual notes, diplomatic editions, translations) should be published under a CC-BY-SA license.

Contributors should submit abstracts of up to 500 words to EasyChair. We particularly welcome abstracts that describe data already available under a Creative Commons license. 

Dates:

January 1, 2014:  Submissions are due. Please submit via EasyChair.

January 20, 2014:  Notification.

Last call for abstracts: Leipzig eHumanities seminar

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

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Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

CFP: Digital Classicist Berlin

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Proposals with abstracts for the winter 2013/2014 Digital Classicst Seminar Berlin are due September 1, 2013. See the full Digital Classicist Berlin call for papers for instructions.