Archive for the ‘Call for papers’ Category

Conference: Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations of History (Gothenburg, March 19-21 2015)

Friday, October 24th, 2014

Reposted from Critical Heritage Studies blog (thanks to Anna Foka):

March 19-21 2015, Gothenburg. Deadline for abstracts November 20, 2014

Full call here

A Critical Approach to Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations for History and Culture.

A conference for scholars and practitioners who study the implementation and potential of visual and multi-sensory representations to challenge and diversify our common understanding of history and culture.

Abstracts for research papers, posters, visual and multi-sensory demonstrations of ongoing projects, workshops, panels, and organised sessions on the conference themes will be accepted until November 20, 2014.

www.challengethepast.com

challengethepast@gu.se

Supporting partners:
Critical Heritage Studies (University of Gothenburg) //  HUMlab (Umeå University) // Visual Arena // Malmö Museer

Stage d’ecdotique. 16-20 février 2015

Monday, October 13th, 2014

Posted for Guillaime Bady:

Chères/chers collègues,
Je vous annonce que le prochain stage d’ecdotique des Sources Chrétiennes aura lieu du 16 au 20 février 2015, avec une initiation à la paléographie le 15 février, et une table-ronde le 19 février, à laquelle je vous invite chaleureusement à participer.

Vous trouverez en pièce jointe l’affiche du stage (le programme n’est pas encore disponible).

Pour une présentation du stage:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/formation/stage-ecdotique-stage-2015

Formulaire de préinscription:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/webform/preinscription-stage-ecdotique-2015

Appel à contribution pour la Table-ronde:
http://ecdotique.hypotheses.org/544

En espérant que les dates retenues, choisies en fonction des disponibilités des intervenants, seront opportunes, d’avance je vous remercie pour la publicité que vous pourrez faire à cette annonce.

Avec mes plus cordiales salutations,

Guillaume Bady

Chercheur CNRS à HiSoMA-Sources Chrétiennes (UMR 5189)
22 rue Sala
69002 Lyon

CFP: Seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

The Digital Latin Library, a joint project of the Society for Classical Studies, the Medieval Academy of America, and the Renaissance Society of America, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, announces a seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age. The seminar will take place on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, the DLL’s host institution, on June 25–26, 2015.

We welcome proposals for papers on all subjects related to the intersection of modern technology with traditional methods for editing Latin texts of all eras. Suggested topics:

  • Keeping the “critical” in digital critical editions
  • The scholarly value of editing texts to be read by humans and machines
  • Extending the usability of critical editions beyond a scholarly audience
  • Visualizing the critical apparatus: moving beyond a print-optimized format
  • Encoding different critical approaches to a text
  • Interoperability between critical editions and other digital resources
  • Dreaming big: a wishlist of features for the optimal digital editing environment

Of particular interest are proposals that examine the scholarly element of preparing a digital edition.

The seminar will be limited to ten participants. Participants will receive a stipend, and all travel and related expenses will be paid by the DLL.

Please send proposals of no more than 650 words to Samuel J. Huskey at dll-seminar@ou.edu by December 1, 2014. Notification of proposal status will be sent in early January.

Artistic practice and language learning, Grenoble, Jan 28-30, 2015

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Call for papers

International symposium, within the context of
ARC 5 – Cultures, Sciences, Sociétés et Médiations
Rhône-Alpes Region (France)
Operation Fabula agitur !

Fabula agitur !
Theatrical and artistic practices, oracy, and the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures
History, Aesthetics, Didactics

Grenoble University (France), January 28-30, 2015

In recent years, specialists in language instruction have paid much attention to the contribution of theatrical practices – and, more broadly speaking, of artistic practices – to the learning of modern languages. This symposium intends to look into a body of work that has so far been neglected: artistic practices used as a way to teach Ancient Languages, whether at school, college, or in local associations, in France and abroad.

For a long time now, however, there have been many examples of such practices. The Educational Theatre of Jesuit colleges, used from the sixteenth century onwards, is one of the most famous examples. Indeed, this type of practice is remarkable because of its wide audience as well as its ‘holistic’ educational approach. Nowadays, Ancient Language teachers may organize Olympiades, tiny drama workshops, unpolished performances or even erudite pageants to provide their pupils with a different approach to Ancient Languages and Cultures. Thanks to the stage, acting and oracy, this approach may be more physical and more emotional than those they are used to encountering in the classroom, in terms of what the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) calls “knowledge”, “skills” and “existential competences” (three macro-categories that apply to each form of learning).

The symposium will be held at Stendhal University – Grenoble III (France) from January 28 to January 30, 2015. Conference participants will be offered short training sessions on Ancient Language theatre as well as two theatrical performances which will clearly display the benefits of artistic practices for the learning of Ancient Languages and Cultures.

Communication and workshop proposals should be sent to Malika Bastin-Hammou (Malika.Bastin@u-grenoble3.fr) and Filippo Fonio (Filippo.Fonio@u-grenoble3.fr) before July 01, 2014. They should be written as a presentation, and not exceed 1,500 characters. Scientific committee decisions will be made available on October 01, 2014 at the latest.

Appel à communication-Fabula agitur (PDF: French & English)

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, March 10th, 2014

We have had requests for a few days’ extension to the deadline for abstracts and consider it only fair to extend that to everyone. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014

See earlier CFP for full details.

CFP: Making Meaning from Data

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Abstracts are invited for the Digital Classics Association colloquium at SCS / AIA Annual Meetings in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 8-11, 2015.

[[ reposted from http://apaclassics.org/annual-meeting/146/cfp-making-meaning-data ]]

Sponsored by the Digital Classics Association
Organizers: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri Kansas-City

Digital techniques hold the promise of providing a consistent and comprehensive basis for the interpretation of classical culture, yet they also raise significant questions of method. Do digital approaches lead us away from certain kinds of interpretation and toward others? How does the quantitative and aggregate nature of argumentation common to digital humanities relate to other modes of understanding the ancient world? Papers are invited for this session that reflect theoretically on the study and understanding of classical antiquity in light of the growing importance of digital methods. Participants may take as their object material any aspect of classical culture, including, but not limited to: history, language, literature, material and visual culture, and philosophy.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously by three readers in accordance with APA regulations. In your email, please confirm that you are an APA member in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the APA website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 5 p.m. Eastern Time, February 3, 2014.

Contact: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY, ncoffee@buffalo.edu

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, January 6th, 2014

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014. (Note new deadline.)

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: www.digitalclassicist.org/wip

Publishing Text for a Digital Age

Friday, December 6th, 2013

March 27-30, 2014
Tufts University
Medford MA
perseus_neh (at) tufts.edu
http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/2014-workshop/

Call for contributions!

As a follow-on to Working with Text in a Digital Age, an NEH-funded Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities and in collaboration with the Open Philology Project at the University of Leipzig, Tufts University announces a two-day workshop on publishing textual data that is available under an open license, that is structured for machine analysis as well as human inspection, and that is in a format that can be preserved over time. The purpose of this workshop is to establish specific guidelines for digital publications that publish and/or annotate textual sources from the human record. The registration for the workshop will be free but space will be limited. Some support for travel and expenses will be available. We particularly encourage contributions from students and early-career researchers.

Textual data can include digital versions of traditional critical editions and translations but such data also includes annotations that make traditional tasks (such as looking up or quoting a primary source) machine-actionable, annotations that may build upon print antecedents (e.g., dynamic indexes of places that can be used to generate maps and geospatial visualizations), and annotations that are only feasible in a digital space (such as alignments between source text and translation or exhaustive markup of morphology, syntax, and other linguistic features).

Contributions can be of two kinds:

  1. Collections of textual data that conform to existing guidelines listed below. These collections must include a narrative description of their contents, how they were produced and what audiences and purposes they were designed to serve.
  2. Contributions about formats for publication. These contributions must contain sufficient data to illustrate their advantages and to allow third parties to develop new materials.

All textual data must be submitted under a Creative Commons license. Where documents reflect a particular point of view by a particular author and where the original expression should for that reason not be changed, they may be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All other contributions must be distributed under a CC-BY-SA license. Most publications may contain data represented under both categories: the introduction to an edition or a data set, reflecting the reasons why one or more authors made a particular set of decisions, can be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All data sets (such as geospatial annotation, morphosyntactic analyses, reconstructed texts with textual notes, diplomatic editions, translations) should be published under a CC-BY-SA license.

Contributors should submit abstracts of up to 500 words to EasyChair. We particularly welcome abstracts that describe data already available under a Creative Commons license. 

Dates:

January 1, 2014:  Submissions are due. Please submit via EasyChair.

January 20, 2014:  Notification.

Last call for abstracts: Leipzig eHumanities seminar

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

(more…)

Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

CFP: Digital Classicist Berlin

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Proposals with abstracts for the winter 2013/2014 Digital Classicst Seminar Berlin are due September 1, 2013. See the full Digital Classicist Berlin call for papers for instructions.

CFP: Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions

Friday, June 7th, 2013

Noted on the Antiquist list:

CALL FOR PAPERS
Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions (CRMEX)

http://www.ontotext.com/CRMEX

26th September 2013 in Valetta, Malta

A workshop affiliated with the 17th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL 2013)

http://www.tpdl2013.info/

Background and Objectives

The CIDOC CRM (international standard ISO 21127:2006) is a conceptual model and ontology with a fundamental role in many data integration efforts in the Digital Libraries and Cultural Heritage (CH) domain. It has spawned various CRM-compliant extensions, such as:

  • Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBRoo) for works and bibliographic data -
  • CRM Digitization (CRMdig) for digitization and provenance
  • CRM for English Heritage (CRMEH) for archaeology
  • British Museum Ontology (BMO) for museum objects
  • Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (SAWS) for medieval gnomologia (collections of wise sayings)
  • PRESSoo, a FRBRoo extension for serial publications (more…)

CFP: CAA2014 Paris Conference

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Seen on the Antiquist list:

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

You are warmly invited to take part in the CAA2014 Paris Conference, which will be held at the “Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne – Institut d’art et d’archéologie” 3 rue Michelet, 75006 Paris, France, from 22th to 25th April 2014.

The CAA (Computers Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology) is an international congress which has taken place every year for 40 years, the last being in Australia. This conference usually brings together hundreds of participants and works on the principle of parallel sessions and workshops or roundtables. (more…)

Classical Association 2014: Call for Papers: ‘New Approaches to e-Learning in Classics’

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Following on from wide interest shown in this topic at the Classical Association 2013 Conference, it is proposed that similar panels on e-Learning be convened for CA 2014. Papers are sought on topics relating to the use of e-learning in Classical subjects, including Latin, Greek, Classical Civilisation and Ancient History. The organisers are keen to encourage the submission of papers presenting the innovative use of new technologies, as well as discussion papers on the current state of theory and practice in e-Learning for Classics. The scope of this panel covers the educational sector as a whole, from Primary level through to Higher Education.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words will need to be submitted for consideration by the end of August. Please contact panel organiser Bartolo Natoli by email (bnatoli@utexas.edu) or tweet/DM (@banatoli) if you would like to be involved.

HESTIA2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

Copied from the Digital Classicist list on behalf of the organisers:

CALL FOR PAPERS

HESTIA2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

University of Southampton 18th July 2013
Organisers: Elton Barker, Stefan Bouzarovski, Leif Isaksen and Tom Brughmans, in collaboration with The Connected Past
http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/

A free one-day seminar on spatial network analysis in archaeology, history, classics, teaching and commercial archaeology.

Spatial relationships are everywhere in our sources about the past: from the ancient roads that connect cities, or ancient authors mentioning political alliances between places, to the stratigraphic contexts archaeologists deal with in their fieldwork. However, as datasets about the past become increasingly large, these spatial networks become ever more difficult to disentangle. Network techniques allow us to address such spatial relationships explicitly and directly through network visualisation and analysis. This seminar aims to explore the potential of such innovative techniques for research, public engagement and commercial purposes.

The seminar is part of Hestia2, a public engagement project aimed at introducing a series of conceptual and practical innovations to the spatial reading and visualisation of texts. Following on from the AHRC-funded “Network, Relation, Flow: Imaginations of Space in Herodotus’s Histories” (Hestia: http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/hestia/ ), Hestia2 represents a deliberate shift from experimenting with geospatial analysis of a single text to making Hestia’s outcomes available to new audiences and widely applicable to other texts through a seminar series, online platform, blog and learning materials with the purpose of fostering knowledge exchange between researchers and non-academics, and generating public interest and engagement in this field.

For this first Hestia2 workshop we welcome contributions addressing any of (but not restricted to) the following themes:

Spatial network analysis techniques
Spatial networks in archaeology, history and classics
Techniques for the discovery and analysis of networks from textual sources
Exploring spatial relationships in classical and archaeological sources
The use of network visualisations and linked datasets for archaeologists active in the commercial sector and teachers
Applications of network analysis in archaeology, history and classics

Please email proposed titles and abstracts (max. 250 words) to:
t.brughmans@soton.ac.uk by May 13th 2013.

Digital Classicist London 2013: Call for Papers

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

The Digital Classicist London seminar series, which provides a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital research methods, invites submissions for Summer 2013.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, semantics and linguistics, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, information science and serious gaming, although this list is by no means exhaustive. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in ancient studies. Presentations should have an academic research agenda relevant both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists.

The seminars will run on Friday afternoons at 16:30, from June to early August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London. There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but please enquire if you’re coming from further afield).

To submit a paper for consideration for the Digital Classicist London Seminars, please email an abstract of 300-500 words to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk, by midnight UTC on March 22nd, 2013.

More information will be found at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2013.html

Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

This call for papers was picked up from the Digital Classicist mailing list.

Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World

An interdisciplinary conference organized by the Digital Classics Association

University at Buffalo, SUNY
Buffalo, NY 14261, USA

April 5 – 6, 2013

Archaeological GIS, digital historical mapping, literary text mining, and other computational techniques are increasingly shaping how we understand classical antiquity. Digital methods are breaking down sub-disciplinary barriers, allowing literary scholars to more easily explore epigraphical inscriptions, archaeologists to place their findings on digital historical maps, and philosophers to explore style and argument with sophisticated search techniques. Digital tools also offer new ways to explain aspects of classical antiquity in the classroom and to the public at large.

The aim of the inaugural Digital Classics Association (DCA) conference is to provide a survey of current approaches to digital methods of research, teaching, and outreach across classical sub-disciplines, with the goals of further opening inter-disciplinary perspectives and establishing common objectives for digital research and education. (more…)

CfP: Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2012/2013

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

(German version below)

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the newly established Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin, which will run for the first time in the Winter Term 2012. This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organised in association with the German Archaeological Institute and the Excellence Cluster TOPOI.

We invite submissions on research which employ digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable increased understanding of the ancient world at large. Abstracts, either in English or in German, of 300-500 words max. (bibliographic references excluded) should be uploaded by midnight MET on September 14, 2012 using the special submission form.

Themes may include digital text, linguistics technology, image processing and visualisation, linked data and semantic web, open access, spatial and network analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. We welcome seminar proposals addressing the application of these methods to individual projects, and particularly contributions which show how the digital component can lead to crossing disciplinary boundaries and answer new research questions. Seminar content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, as well as information scientists and digital humanists, with an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of these fields.

Seminars will run fortnightly on Tuesday evenings (17:00-18:30) starting in October 2012 in the TOPOI Building Dahlem, hosted by the Excellence Cluster TOPOI. The full programme will be finalised and announced in late September. It is planned to grant an allowance to speakers for travelling and accommodation costs. Further details will be available once the program is finalised. (more…)

Digital Classicist London 2012: Call for Papers

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

This is a reminder of the approaching deadline (April 1st) for abstracts for this summer’s Digital Classicist seminar series.
Full details are on the earlier post and the Digital Classicist website.

CFP: TEI Annual Meeting

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

Call for papers and proposals

TEI and the C(r|l)o(w|u)d
2012 Annual Conference and Members’ Meeting of the TEI Consortium
Texas A&M University, Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture

  • Deadline for submissions: May 15, 2012
  • Meeting dates: Wed 7 November to Sat 10 November, 2012
  • Workshop dates: Mon 5 November to Wed 7 November, 2012 (see separate call)

The Programme Committee of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Text Encoding
Initiative (TEI – www.tei-c.org) Consortium invites individual paper proposals, panel sessions, poster sessions, and tool demonstrations particularly, but
not exclusively, on digital texts, scholarly editing or any topic that applies TEI to its research.

(more…)

Digital Classicist London 2012: Call for Papers

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

The annual Digital Classicist London seminar series on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component will run again in Summer 2012.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, linguistics technology, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information scientists or digital humanists, and have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

The seminars will run on Friday afternoons (16:30-18:00) from June to mid-July in Senate House, London, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (ending early this year to avoid clashing with the Olympic Games). In previous years collected papers from the seminars have been published in a special issue of Digital Medievalist; a printed volume from Ashgate Press; a BICS supplement (in production). The last few years’ papers have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

To submit a paper for consideration for the Digital Classicist London Seminars, please email an abstract of 300-500 words to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk, by midnight UTC on April 8th, 2012.

More information will be found at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2012.html

Workshop on Digital Humanities and the Study of Religion in Antiquity

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

From Michael Satlow at Brown University. Please direct all questions to him.

WORKSHOP CALL FOR PAPERS
FEBRUARY 13-14, 2012
BROWN UNIVERSITY

The Program in Judaic Studies in collaboration with the Brown University Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship is pleased to announce plans for a two-day workshop devoted to investigating the ways in which the digital humanities has or can change the study of religion in antiquity. The workshop will take place on February 13-14, 2012, at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

We invite proposals for papers and presentations that explore the intersection of ancient religion and the digital humanities. We are particularly interested in presentations of projects that have the potential to open up new questions and avenues of research. Can digital tools not only allow us to do our work faster and more thoroughly but also enable entirely new kinds of research? How might different digital data (e.g., textual, geographic, and material culture) be used together most productively? The workshop will concentrate primarily on research rather than directly on pedagogy or scholarly communication. One session will be devoted to “nuts and bolts” issues of funding and starting a digital project.

The focus of the workshop will be on the religions of West Asia and the Mediterranean basin through the early Islamic period. Proposals relating to other regions, however, will also be considered.

More and updated information can be found at: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Judaic_Studies/AncientReligionModernTechnologyWorkshop.html

Please submit proposals of up to 300 words by October 31, 2011, to Michael Satlow (Michael_Satlow@Brown.edu).

InterFace2011 Call for Talks

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly hosted by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice.

The symposium aims to foster collaboration and shared understanding between scholars in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method. With a focus on the interests and concerns of Ph.D students and early career researchers, the programme will include networking activities, opportunities for research exposition, and various training and workshop activities.

A core component of the programme will be a lightning talks session in which each participant will make a two-minute presentation on their research. The session will be lively and dynamic. Each presentation must be exactly two minutes long, making use of necessary, interesting, appropriate, or entertaining visual or sound aids, and condensing a whole Ph.D’s worth of ideas and work into this short slot.

Participants will be able to join workshops in:

  • network analysis;
  • bibliographic software;
  • data visualisation;
  • linked data.

There will be talks on:

  • user studies and social research;
  • discourse analysis in science and technology;
  • how to get your work published;
  • how to apply for research funding.

There will also be two keynote talks given by speakers whose work marks the leading edge of technology in scholarship and practice. The speakers will be:

Finally, the symposium will conclude with an unconference; a participatory, collaborative, and informal event in which the form and content is decided on by participants as it unfolds and in which discussion and production is emphasised over presentation and analysis. Participants may wish to share their own skills, learn a new skill, establish and develop a collaborative project, or hold a focused discussion.

We are now seeking applications for participation in InterFace. Applications are encouraged from Ph.D students and early career researchers in all humanities and computing disciplines. The key component of your application will be a 150-word abstract for your proposed lightening talk.

You can submit your application here:

http://www.interface2011.org.uk/submit

The deadline for applications is Friday 25 February 2011.

The committee will select participants from among the applications received and successful applicants will be informed on Monday 4 April 2011. If your application is accepted, you will then be invited to register. A participation fee will be charged to cover costs of lunches, refreshments, venue, and speakers. This fee will be £35.

Key Dates:

  • Friday 25 February: Deadline for applications
  • Friday 1 April: Notification of successful applications
  • Monday 18 April: Deadline for registration for successful applicants
  • Monday 27 July: InterFace 2011 begins

We look forward to receiving your application.

The InterFace 2011 Committee

http://www.interface2011.org.uk/

enquiries@interface2011.org.uk

Digital Classicist Seminar 2011, CFP

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Call for Papers

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars in Summer 2011, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. Themes could include, but are by no means limited to, visualization, information and data linking, digital textual and linguistic studies, and geographic information and network analysis; so long as the content is likely to be of interest both to classicists / ancient historians / archaeologists and information scientists / digital humanists, and would be considered serious research in at least one of those fields.

The seminars run on Friday afternoons (16:30 – 19:00) from June to mid-August in Senate House, London, and are hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (University of London). In previous years collected papers from the Digital Classicist seminars have been published in an online special issue of Digital Medievalist, a printed volume from Ashgate Press, a BICS supplement (in production), and the last three years have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

We have a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by April 15th, 2011. We shall announce the full programme at the end of April.

(Coörganised by Will Wootton, Charlotte Tupman, Matteo Romanello, Simon Mahony, Timothy Hill, Alejandro Giacometti, Juan Garcés, Stuart Dunn & Gabriel Bodard.)

TEI Annual Meeting: Call for Papers

Monday, May 10th, 2010

Deadline extended to May 15, see original call.