Archive for the ‘Call for papers’ Category

Digital Classicist 2010 Seminars CFP

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, with support from the British Library, in Summer 2010 on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that demonstrates interdisciplinarity or work on the intersections between Ancient History, Classics or Archaeology and a digital, technical or practice-based discipline.

The Digital Classicist seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published(*) in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008-9); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series. A small budget is available to help with travel costs.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2010. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Regards,

The organizers

Gabriel Bodard, King’s College London
Stuart Dunn, King’s College London
Juan Garcés, Greek Manuscripts Department, British Library
Simon Mahony, University College London
Melissa Terras, University College London

(more…)

Pre-conference workshops at DH2010

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

As in previous years, the days 3-6 July, before the DH2010 conference (7-11 July at King’s College London <http://www.cch.kcl.ac.uk/dh2010>) have been set aside for community-run workshops. One can reach a diverse and committed body of participants in the Digital Humanities at DH2010. Do you or your project have a workshop up your sleeve that would interest this Digital Humanities community?

Half- or one-day slots are available for workshops, which need to be self-organized and self-funding. KCL can provide space for the workshop at no or low cost, so it is likely that the costs per participant would be low.

We would like to receive proposals for such workshops.

In your full proposal (total 500-800 words), please include:

(1) a brief description of the workshop programme, the project or community out of which it arises, the trainers who will run the workshop, and its proposed length;

(2) what is the demand for this workshop, and who do you expect the audience to be? What minimum number of attendees would be needed for you to do the workshop?

(3) what funding is available or will you seek to help to support the costs of this workshop (for instance, travel for trainers, lunch or refreshments for participants, as applicable)?

A few groups have already expressed interest in running workshops, and we have been talking informally with them. If you have ideas that is not yet fully formed, we would be delighted to e-speak to you about them before you submit a proposal.

The closing date for full proposals will be 31 December 2009. Please send them via email to both John Bradley (john.bradley@kcl.ac.uk) and Gabriel Bodard (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference (CAA2010)

Monday, October 12th, 2009

Conference: CAA 2010
XXXVIII Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology “Fusion of Cultures”

Conference Dates: April 6-9, 2010
Conference Location: Granada, Spain
URL: http://www.caa2010.org

Upcoming Deadlines:

– Session proposals submission deadline November 15, 2009
– Round tables proposals submission deadline December 15, 2009
– Workshops proposals submission deadline January 31, 2010

Other importat dates:
– Full papers submission will be open on November 20th,2009
– Full papers submission deadline December 15, 2009
– Short papers submission deadline January 31, 2010
– Poster submission deadline January 31, 2010
– Virtual theatre videos submission deadline January 31, 2010

The XXXVIII Annual CAA Conference will be held in Granada, Spain, from April 6 to 9, 2010 and is expected to bring together archaeologist, computer scientist and mathematicians to explore and exchange knowledge in order to enhance our understanding of the past. Classical disciplines like archaeology, anthropology or geography, and more modern ones like computer science, geomatics or museology exchange their most recent advances during the conference.
CAA 2010 is inspired in the concept “Fusion of Cultures” that identifies the scope of the conference and the spirit of the historical city of Granada. The aim of the conference is to create an collaborative atmosphere among all disciplines, by participating via papers, posters, round tables, workshops, short papers and a novel virtual theatre non-stop show. (more…)

DH2010: Digital Humanities 2010 CFP

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

Forwarded from DH2010 committee:

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the Digital Humanities 2010 Conference.

Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations Digital Humanities 2010
Call for Papers
Abstract Deadline: Oct. 31, 2009

Proposals must be submitted electronically using the system which will be available at the conference web site from October 8th. Presentations may be any of the following:

• Single papers (abstract max of 1500 words)
• Multiple paper sessions (overview max of 500 words)
• Posters (abstract max of 1500 words)

Call for Papers Announcement

The International Programme Committee invites submissions of abstracts of between 750 and 1500 words on any aspect of humanities computing, broadly defined to encompass the common ground between information technology and problems in humanities research and teaching. We welcome submissions in all areas of the humanities, particularly interdisciplinary work. We especially encourage submissions on the current state of the art in humanities computing, and on recent developments.

Suitable subjects for proposals include, for example,

* text analysis, corpora, language processing, language learning
* IT in librarianship and documentation
* computer-based research in cultural and historical studies
* computing applications for the arts, architecture and music
* research issues such as: information design and modelling; the cultural impact of the new media
* the role of digital humanities in academic curricula

The special theme of the 2010 conference is cultural heritage old and new.

(more…)

InterFace 2009: First Call for Papers

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Forwarded for Leif Isaksen from the Antiquist list:

—————————–

First Call for Papers

InterFace 2009:
1st National Symposium for Humanities and Technology

9-10 July, University of Southampton, UK.

http://www.interface09.org.uk

InterFace is a new type of annual event. Part conference, part workshop, part networking opportunity, it will bring together postdocs, early career academics and postgraduate researchers from the fields of Information Technology and the Humanities in order to foster cutting-edge collaboration. As well as having a focus on Digital Humanities, it will also be an important forum for Humanities contributions to Computer Science. The event will furthermore provide a permanent web presence for communication between delegates both during, and following, the conference.

Delegate numbers are limited to 80 (half representing each sector) and all participants will be expected to present a poster or a ‘lightning talk’ (a two minute presentation) as a stimulus for discussion and networking sessions. Delegates can also expect to receive illuminating keynote talks from world-leading experts, presentations on successful interdisciplinary projects, ‘Insider’s Guides’ and workshops. The registration fee for the two-day event is £30. For a full overview of the event, please visit the website.

Paper Submissions:

If you are interested in attending, please submit an original paper, of 1500 words or less, describing an idea or concept you wish to present. Please indicate whether you would prefer to produce a poster or perform a 2-minute lightning talk. Papers must be produced as a PDF or in Microsoft Word (.doc) format and submitted through our EasyChair page:

– Register for an easy chair account:
http://www.easychair.org/conferences/account_apply.cgi
– Log in: https://www.easychair.org/?conf=interface09
– Click New Submission at the top of the page and fill in the form.

Make sure you:
– Select your preference of lightning talk or poster.
– Select whether you are representing humanities or technology.
– Attach and upload your paper.

If you encounter any problems, please e-mail
submissions@interface09.org.uk

A number of travel bursaries may be available to successful applicants – if you would like to be considered for one, please email bursaries@interface09.org.uk and provide grounds for consideration.

Papers should focus on potential (and realistic) areas for collaboration between the Technology and Humanities Sectors, either by addressing particular problems, new developments, or both. Prior work may be presented where relevant but the nature of the paper must be forward-looking. As such, the scope is extremely broad but topics might include:

Technology

* 3D immersive environments
* Pervasive technologies
* Online collaboration
* Natural language processing
* Sensor networks
* The Semantic Web
* Agent based modelling
* Web Science

Humanities

* Spatial cognition
* Text editing and analysis
* New Media
* Linguistics
* Applied sociodynamics & social network analysis
* Archaeological reconstruction
* Information Ethics
* Dynamic logics
* Electronic corpora

Due to the limited number of places, papers will be subject to review by committee in order to maintain quality and a balanced programme. Applicants will be notified by email as to their acceptance. Accepted papers will be published online one week in advance of the conference.

Important Dates:

* Paper Submission Deadline: 1 May 2009
* Acceptances Announced: 18 May 2009
* Conference: 9th-10th July 2009

Confirmed Speakers

Keynote:
* Dame Wendy Hall, University of Southampton,
President of the Association of Computing Machinery

Insider’s Guides:
* Stephen Brown, De Montfort University
President of the Association for Learning Technology

* Ed Parsons
Geospatial Technologist, Google

* Sarah Porter
Head of Innovation, JISC

Project Showcase:

* Mary Orr & Mark Weal, University of Southampton
Digital Flaubert

* Adrian Bell
The Soldier in Later Medieval England

Workshops:

1) Text Encoding Initiative (TEI)
Arianna Ciula, European Science Foundation & Sebastian Rahtz, Oxford
University

2) Visualisation
Facilitator TBC

3) Data Management
Facilitator TBC

4) New Media
Facilitator TBC

For further information, please visit the conference website
(http://www.interface09.org.uk) or
e-mail info@interface09.org.uk

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Wednesday, February 4th, 2009

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of Work-in-Progress seminars in Summer 2009, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that involves equal collaboration with a computer scientist or that would be considered serious research in the Computing field as well as Classics, Archaeology, and/or Ancient History.

The Work-in-Progress seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London, and are sponsored by the Institute for Classical Studies (UofL), the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (KCL), the Centre for e-Research (KCL), and the British Library. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2009. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Best regards,

Gabriel Bodard (CCH)
Stuart Dunn (CeRch)
Juan Garcés (BL)
Simon Mahony (CCH)

Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture

Saturday, November 29th, 2008

Posted on the Digital Classicist list by Melissa Terras.

Call for Papers: Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture

Editors Brent Nelson (University of Saskatchewan) and Melissa Terras
(University College London) invite submissions for a collection of
essays on “Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture” to
be published in the New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance
Studies Series edited by Ray Siemens and William Bowen.

This collection of essays will build on the accomplishments of recent
scholarship on materiality by bringing together innovative research
on the theory and praxis of digitizing material cultures from roughly
500 A.D. to 1700 A.D. Scholars of the medieval and early modern
periods have begun to pay more attention to the material world not
only as a means of cultural experience, but also as a shaping
influence upon culture and society, looking at the world of material
objects as both an area of study and a rich source of evidence for
interpreting the past. Digital media enable new ways of evoking,
representing, recovering, and simulating these materials in
non-traditional, non-textual (or para-textual) ways and present new
possibilities for recuperating and accumulating material from across
vast distances and time, enabling both preservation and comparative
analysis that is otherwise impossible or impractical. Digital
mediation also poses practical and theoretical challenges, both
logistical (such as gaining access to materials) and intellectual
(for example, the relationship between text and object). This volume
of essays will promote the deployment of digital technologies to the
study of material culture by bringing together expertise garnered
from complete and current digital projects, while looking forward to
new possibilities for digital applications; it will both take stock
of the current state of theory and practice and advance new
developments in digitization of material culture. The editors welcome
submissions from all disciplines on any research that addresses the
use of digital means for representing and investigating material
culture as expressed in such diverse areas as:

• travelers’ accounts, navigational charts and cartography
• collections and inventories
• numismatics, antiquarianism and early archaeology
• theatre and staging (props, costumes, stages, theatres)
• the visual arts of drawing, painting, sculpture, print making, and
architecture
• model making
• paper making and book printing, production, and binding
• manuscripts, emblems, and illustrations
• palimpsests and three-dimensional writing
• instruments (magic, alchemical, and scientific)
• arts and crafts
• the anatomical and cultural body

We welcome approaches that are practical and/or theoretical, general
in application or particular and project-based. Submissions should
present fresh advances in methodologies and applications of digital
technologies, including but not limited to:

• XML and databases and computational interpretation
• three-dimensional computer modeling, Second Life and virtual worlds
• virtual research environments
• mapping technology
• image capture, processing, and interpretation
• 3-D laser scanning, synchrotron, or X-ray imaging and analysis
• artificial intelligence, process modeling, and knowledge representation

Papers might address such topics and issues as:

• the value of inter-disciplinarity (as between technical and
humanist experts)
• relationships between image and object; object and text; text and image
• the metadata of material culture
• curatorial and archival practice
• mediating the material object and its textual representations
• imaging and data gathering (databases and textbases)
• the relationship between the abstract and the material text
• haptic, visual, and auditory simulation
• tools and techniques for paleographic analysis

Enquiries and proposals should be sent to brent.nelson[at]usask.ca by
10 January 2009. Complete essays of 5,000-6,000 words in length will
be due on 1 May 2009.

CFP: Natural Language Processing for Ancient Language

Monday, November 24th, 2008

Chuck Jones has just posted a call for papers for a special issue of the TAL journal (Revue TAL) on the topic “Natual Language Processing for Ancient Language” over at AWBG.

2009 Conference of Computer Applications to Archaeology (CFP)

Sunday, September 14th, 2008

Via Centernet:

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PROPOSALS FOR SESSIONS, WORKSHOPS, AND ROUNDTABLES at the 2009 Conference of Computer Applications to Archaeology (CAA)
Deadline: October 15, 2008

The 37th annual conference on Computer Applications to Archaeology (CAA) will take place at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Williamsburg, Virginia from March 22 to 26, 2009. The conference will bring together students and scholars to explore current theory and applications of quantitative methods and information technology in the field of archaeology. CAA members come from a diverse range of disciplines, including archaeology, anthropology, art and architectural history, computer science, geography, geomatics, historic preservation, museum studies, and urban history.

The full CFP is available here: http://www.caa2009.org/PapersCall.cfm

CFP: Digital Humanities 09

Thursday, September 11th, 2008

The Call for Papers for Digital Humanities 09, scheduled for 22-25 June at the University of Maryland, has just been issued. Abstracts are due on 31 October 2008.

Digitizing Early Material Culture, new deadline

Wednesday, May 7th, 2008

The Digitizing Early Material Culture conference, for which we posted a CFP back in February, has a new deadline and slightly changed line-up of speakers (Meg Twycross replaces Melissa terras). See the new programme here (PDF).

CFP: DRHA 2008: New Communities of Knowledge and Practice

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

By way of a long string of reposts, originally to AHESSC:

Date: Fri, 29 Feb 2008 17:37:17 -0000
From: Stuart Dunn
To: AHESSC@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PERFORMANCES

Forthcoming Conference

DRHA 2008: New Communities of Knowledge and Practice

The DRHA (Digital Resources in the Humanities and Arts) conference is held annually at various academic venues throughout the UK. The conference theme this year is to promote discussion around new collaborative environments, collective knowledge and redefining disciplinary boundaries. The conference, hosted by Cambridge with its fantastic choice of conference venues will take place from Sunday 14th September to Wednesday 17th September.

The aim of the conference is to:

  • Establish a site for mutually creative exchanges of knowledge.
  • Promote discussion around new collaborative environments and collective knowledge.
  • Encourage and celebrate the connections and tensions within the liminal spaces that exist between the Arts and Humanities.
  • Redefine disciplinary boundaries.
  • Create a forum for debate around notions of the ‘solitary’ and the collaborative across the Arts and Humanities.
  • Explore the impact of the Arts and Humanities on ICT: design and narrative structures and visa versa.

There will be a variety of sessions concerned with the above but also with a particular emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration and theorising around practice. There will also be various installations and performances focussing on the same theme. Keynote talks will be given by our plenary speakers who we are pleased to announce are Sher Doruff, Research Fellow (Art, Research and Theory Lectoraat) and Mentor at the Amsterdam School for the Arts, Alan Liu, Professor of English, University of California Santa Barbara and Sally Jane Norman, Director of the Culture Lab, Newcastle University. In addition to this, there will be various round table discussions together with a panel relating to ‘Second Life’ and a special forum ‘Engaging research and performance through pervasive and locative arts projects’ led by Steve Benford, Professor of Collaborative Computing, University of Nottingham. Also planned is the opportunity for a more immediate and informal presentation of work in our ‘Quickfire’ style events. Whether papers, performance or other, all proposals should reflect the critical engagement at the heart of DRHA.

Visit the website for more information and a link to the proposals website.

The Deadline for submissions will be 30 April 2008 and abstracts should be approximately 1000 words.

Cambridge’s venues range from the traditional to the contemporary all situated within walking distance of central departments, museums and galleries. The conference will be based around Cambridge University’s Sedgwick Site, particularly the West Road concert hall, where delegates will have use of a wide range of facilities including a recital room and a ‘black box’ performance space, to cater for this year’s parallel programming and performances.

Sue Broadhurst DRHA Programme Chair

Dr Sue Broadhurst
Reader in Drama and Technology, Head of Drama, School of Arts
Brunel University
West London, UB8 3PH
UK
Direct Line:+44(0)1895 266588 Extension: 66588
Fax: +44(0)1895 269768
Email: susan.broadhurst@brunel.ac.uk.

Digitizing Early Material Culture (CFP)

Thursday, February 14th, 2008

Posted for Brent Nelson:

Digitizing Early Material Culture: from Antiquity to Modernity
A Seminar to be held in conjunction with
CaSTA (the Canadian Symposium on Text Analysis) 2008:
New Directions in Text Analysis
A Joint Humanities Computing, Computer Science Seminar and Conference at University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, 16-18 October 2008
“Digitizing Early Material Culture: from Antiquity to Modernity” seminar will be held at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon 16 October 2008 and will feature guest speakers:

  • Melissa Terras, Lecturer in Electronic Communications in the School of Library, Archive and Information Studies at University College London
  • Lisa Snyder, Associate Director of the Experiential Technologies Centre, University of California Los Angeles

It will be held in conjunction with CaSTA 2008–“New Directions in Text Analysis,” 17-18 August, featuring guest speakers:

  • David Hoover, Professor of English at New York University (keynote)
  • Hoyt Duggan, Professor Emeritus in English at University of Virginia
  • Geoffrey Rockwell, Associate Professor in Humanities Computing at University of Alberta
  • Cara Leitch, PhD candidate in English at University of Victoria

(more…)

CFP: Open Scholarship: Authority, Community and Sustainability in the Age of Web 2.0

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2008

By way of JISC-Repositories:

The 12th International Conference on Electronic Publishing (25 to 27 June 2008, Toronto, Canada) has just extended its call for papers to 31 January 2008. Full details below …

(more…)

CFP: Virtual Worlds: Libraries, Education and Museums

Monday, January 21st, 2008

Gabriel Bodard just posted a call for papers for a “virtual worlds” conference, to be held in Second Life on 8 March 2008. You can read the full CFP in the Digital Classicist Archive. I find it unfortunate that the conference organizers (Bodard is not one) have chosen to organize and publicize the conference via a facebook group that requires interested parties to log in just to read about the event.

CFP: International aerial archaeology conference

Monday, January 21st, 2008

Another interesting call for papers via Jack Sasson’s Agade list:

CALL FOR PAPERS

International aerial archaeology conference (AARG 2008)
Ljubljana, 9 – 11 September 2008

Hosted by the Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana

Proposals for sessions, papers and posters are invited

The following sessions have been proposed, for which offers of papers are welcome:

  • Aerial Archaeology in the Mediterranean; New Projects; Postgraduate research;
  • Airborne Thematic Mapping/Airborne Laser Scanning;
  • An archaeology of natural places … from the air;
  • Aerial photography in context – recording landscape and urban areas

11 September Conference Day 3

Field Trip

Note: session titles are provisional and all papers and session proposals are welcome.

Oral papers should usually be 20 minutes duration, and equal weighting is given to poster presentations.

Closing date for abstracts is 31st May 2008.

Address for conference correspondence:

Dave Cowley
RCAHMS
16 Bernard Terrace
Edinburgh, EH8 9NX
Scotland
Email dave.cowley@rcahms.gov.uk

CFP: 3D Colour Laser Scanning

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

Noted by way of the DigitalClassicist List:

Reminder – Second Call for Papers

Dear colleague,

A conference on 3D Colour Laser Scanning will be held at UCL on the 27th and 28th of March 2008.

Proposals are invited for contributions to the conference. The proposals, in the form of extended abstracts, should focus on one of the following main themes:

  1. 3D scanning in Education and Interpretation
  2. 3D scanning in Display and Exhibition
  3. 3D scanning in Conservation.

More general papers related to the applications of 3D scanning technologies in the museum and  heritage sector are also welcome.

Abstracts should be 800-1000 words, and in English. Author(s) should select 5 to 8 keywords and should indicate clearly on the Abstract Submission Form to which theme the paper is intended. The presenting author (corresponding author) must also be clearly indicated.

Please note that the deadline for the submission of abstracts has been extended to the 8th of February 2008.

Authors will be informed whether their papers have been submitted no later than 15th February 2008. Selected abstracts will be incorporated in an edited cd-rom publication.

Please see below the proposed outline of the abstract submission form.

Abstracts should be submitted electronically or by post to:

Kalliopi Vacharopoulou,
Chorley Institute, Pearson Building, UCL
Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT
Email: k.vacharopoulou@ucl.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 (0)207 679 2074

The conference is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and is organised by UCL Museums and Collections and UCL Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering.

In the meantime, please do not hesitate to contact me with further enquiries or for an electronic version of the abstract submission form.

I will be looking forward to hearing from you.

Kindest regards,

Kalliopi Vacharopoulou

3D Colour Laser Scanning Project Assistant
UCL Museums and Collections

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION FORM
Title of the Paper:
Theme [1]:
Author(s) [2]:
Corresponding Author [3]
Keywords (5-8):
ABSTRACT (800-1000 words) [4]

[1]  Authors must indicate clearly to which theme the paper is intended. The main themes are: Display and exhibition; Education and Interpretation; Conservation; General applications of 3d scanning in the museum sector.

[2]  Should include the author(s) name(s), affiliation, mailing address, e-mail.

[3]  Should indicate who the corresponding author is (i.e. the person who will be presenting the paper, in case of multiple authors)

[4]  An abstract should be 800-1000 words, and in English. It should include all main points of the paper that will be presented.

CFP “Podcasting and the Classics” APA 2009 Philadelphia

Tuesday, January 15th, 2008

Noted on Classics-l:

Call for Papers: APA 2009, Philadelphia
Outreach Committee

“Podcasting and the Classics”
Co-organizers Chris Ann Matteo and Ed DeHoratius

In the field of classical humanities, professors and K -12 teachers alike are witnessing the democratizing power of the “podcast” word: audio players and iPods are intimate hardware for both our students and the public we want to reach, and have proven a particularly powerful tool to restore oral and aural practice in our classrooms.

In the past few years, a number of highly successful podcasts — audio media that are free to download — have received attention from National Public Radio and other news sources. A few examples of these are WordNerds out of Reston, Virginia, The Adventures of Indigo Jones, Classical Archaeologist! sponsored by the Teagle Foundation, and Twelve Byzantine Rulers from Stony Brook School teacher Lars Brownworth.

This panel will explore the various kinds of podcasts that are available and in development, and will explore uses of this new technology to enhance our pedagogy.

The kinds of questions the panelists might address could include:

  • What are some of the ways we might use this in our classrooms, in both K-12 and college-level education?
  • How and why did a given podcast originate?
  • How does one actually get “podcasted” (what are the “bottom-line” practicalities: how much does it cost in terms of money, time, equipment)?
  • Should we regard the podcast as an oral performance text?
  • What does it mean to have a “timely” podcast in our subject matter (i.e., they are “live” and yet time can lapse, and I can elect when I want to listen)?
  • What role do we see podcasts playing in our culture (educational, entertainment, and research)?
  • What are the political or ideological dimensions of conveying the classics in this new medium?
  • How does it affect what might be perceived as a “divide” separating the classics secondary school teacher and the professoriate?
  • Can podcasts be used in our scholarship and, if so, how?
  • What kinds of collaboration between academic and media interests have been productive in this area?
  • What other uses can we imagine for them?

Submit abstracts electronically to Chris Ann Matteo camatteo@mac.com by Friday, 1 February 2008. The abstract proper should follow the APA guidelines (one full page in 11 pt type; title in upper right-hand corner in 12 pt type) and be anonymous: it should contain a clear statement of purpose, a summary of the argumentation, some examples to be used in the argumentation, and, if appropriate, a brief explanation of the abstract?s relationship to previous literature on the topic. Papers will normally be no longer than 20 minutes long. Please include requests for audio-visual equipment and allow time for listening to excerpts in your estimate of time needed.

Digital Curation of Cultural Heritage

Monday, December 17th, 2007

By way of various email lists and blogs, we learn of the call for papers for CIDOC 2008 Athens, “The Digital Curation of Cultural Heritage”:

Digital curation emerged as an important new concept in the theory and management of cultural information.

It covers all of the actions needed to maintain digitised and born-digital cultural objects and data, going beyond digital preservation to encompass their utilisation in the context of their entire life cycle, from acquisition and appraisal to exhibition, learning and commercial exploitation.

The focus of CIDOC 2008 on the digital curation of cultural heritage will allow curators, collection managers, documentalists, archivists and museum information specialists to explore a broad range of theoretical, methodological, professional practice and technological issues related to the appraisal, digitisation, management, representation, access and use of digital cultural assets, such as those increasigly becoming part of museum information systems and digital archives.

A core emphasis of the meeting will be to understand and re-contextualise the know-how and history of established curatorial practice in museums, and memory institutions, in general, in the new field of digital cultural heritage; to review and discuss the applicability of standards- and good practice-related work in the context of managing digital cultural information; and to identify and explore the issues, methods and challenges involved with the development of new genres and contexts of virtual exhibition, e-learning and technology-enhanced services for scholarship and research.

More: http://www.cidoc2008.gr

No more old wine in new wineskins

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2007

Tom Elliott has put out a new call for papers that looks good, “The Publication and Study of Inscriptions in the Age of the Computer.”

2nd Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science

Saturday, August 25th, 2007

From Martin Mueller at Northwestern (full disclosure: I’ll be a speaker):

The program for the Second Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science has now been set, and you can see it at http://dhcs.northwestern.edu/index.html.

The Colloquium will take place on Sunday and Monday, October 21-22, 2007 at Northwestern University. This is an event jointly sponsored by the Illinois Institute for Technology, Northwestern University, and the University of Chicago. Registration is free, and you are cordially invited to attend.

Information about logistics will appear shortly on the web site. You may also contact the conference coordinator, Nathan Mead (n-mead2 at northwestern dot edu).

There still is room for poster sessions, and we will be delighted to receive and review submissions on a rolling basis. Please send them to dhcs-submissions at listhost.uchicago.edu.

The theme of this year’s colloquium is “Exploring the scholarly query potential of high quality text and image archives in a collaborative environment.” The presentations range widely across cultures and technologies. There are digital surrogates of Mesopotamian cylinder seals and of 3,000 clay statuettes from a Chinese Buddhist temple that make you see things you could not easily see “in the flesh.” How to find readable and manipulable representations of the symbols that appear in Isaac Newton’s alchemical writings. How to explore the “countless links” that are at the heart of the Orlando Project about Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present. How to make the history of North Carolina speak in different ways when the print records (a massive work of late nineteenth century scholarship) are translated into a digital medium.

A special session on Monday will explore the different ways in which quite similar technologies of text mining support different goals in legal, literary, and business analysis, and it will ask what these different approaches can learn from each other.

The keynote speakers, Matt Kirschenbaum (The Remaking of Reading) and Lew Lancaster (Beyond 2-D Text/Plan: The Chinese Buddhist in 3-D) nicely define the range of topics. Ray Siemens will sum it all up.

Digital Media and Peer Review in Medieval Studies

Saturday, August 4th, 2007

Copied from the Digital Medievalist mailing list:

Call for Papers for the 43rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 8-11, 2008, Kalamazoo, Michigan

The Medieval Academy of America Committee on Electronic Resources invites submissions to the following sponsored session:

“Digital Media and Peer Review in Medieval Studies”

Medievalists are increasingly turning to digital media both to produce new types of scholarship such as encoded texts and non-bookish digital projects (e.g. archives and interactive electronic resources) and to advance and increase the efficiency of traditional forms of scholarship such as critical editions. There is not yet widespread agreement, however, regarding how this new work should count for academic promotion, and many scholars working in these new media find that there are few established avenues for getting their work peer reviewed. At the same time, we are witnessing rapid and widespread changes in how we use print texts (e.g. often in scanned, searchable copies), and many traditional publishers of print journals and monographs are under enormous financial pressures from declining sales and print runs, thereby further limiting access to peer review and opportunities for publication. How can we, as a community, bring scholarship, publishing, and the need for peer review into balance?

Please email abstracts (not to exceed 300 words) to Timothy Stinson (stinson@jhu.edu). Please include name, professional/university affiliation, and contact information.

Student Bursaries for Computing in History Teaching

Thursday, August 2nd, 2007

Copied from the Digital Classicist mailing list

STUDENT BURSARIES FOR COMPUTING IN HISTORY TEACHING

The AHRC ICT Methods Network (www.methodsnetwork.ac.uk), which exists to promote and support the use of advanced ICT methods in arts and humanities research, is offering a limited number of bursaries to post-graduate students who wish to present a paper at the conference ‘Distributed Ignorance and the Unthinking Machine: Computing in History Teaching’. The conference takes place on 17 November at The National Archives, Kew, London, and is organized by the UK branch of the Association of History and Computing (AHC-UK).

Applications for bursaries are sought from post-graduate students registered at UK Universities whose research interests are grounded in areas covered by this years AHC-UK conference. These include: when and how you acquired your computing skills, what support and training you had or would like to have had, your perspective on the use of computers in history teaching and identification of key computing skills that history graduates should have and other areas which may be considered to be within the AHC’s sphere of interest. Applicants should submit a paper proposal via the AHC-UK website in the first instance, see http://www.gla.ac.uk/centres/hca/ahc/conf.htm

The bursaries are intended to help towards conference expenses. Successful applicants will be able to claim funds up to a total of £200 toward the cost of conference fees, accommodation and travel.

If you wish to apply for a bursary please submit a proposal for the AHC-UK conference in the first instance. You will hear if your proposal has been accpeted by the 28 September. If you are successful please complete the bursary application form, available on the AHRC ICT Methods Network website:
http://www.methodsnetwork.ac.uk/community/postgraduates.html

If you have any queries about completing the form please contact Torsten Reimer (torsten.reimer@kcl.ac.uk) using the heading – AHC-UK Bursary Applications – in the subject bar.

Bursary winners will be asked to submit a short report to the Methods
Network following the conference.

Please address any enquiries about the AHC-UK conference to i.anderson@hatii.arts.gla.ac.uk

Electronic corpora of ancient languages

Wednesday, July 25th, 2007

Posted to the Digital Classicist list (from ancientpglinguistics) by Kalle Korhonen:

Electronic corpora of ancient languages

International Conference
Prague (Czech Republic), November 16-17th, 2007
http://enlil.ff.cuni.cz/ecal/
Call for papers

Aims of conference

Electronic corpora of ancient languages offer important information about the culture and history of ancient civilizations, but at the same time they constitute a valuable source of linguistic information. The scholarly community is increasingly aware of the importance of computer-aided analysis of these corpora, and of the rewards it can bring. The construction of electronic corpora for ancient languages is a complex task. Many more pieces of information have to be taken into account than for living languages, e.g. the artefact bearing the text, lacunae, level of restoration, etc. The electronic corpora can be enriched with links to images, annotations, and other secondary sources. The annotations should deal with matters such as textual damage, possible variant readings, etc., as well as with many features specific to ancient languages. (more…)

Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication (CATaC’08)

Tuesday, July 24th, 2007

copied from Humanist:

CALL FOR PAPERS

ICTs Bridging Cultures? Theories, Obstacles, Best Practices 6th
International Conference on Cultural Attitudes towards Technology and Communication (CATaC08)

24-27 June 2008 Université de Nîmes, France Conference languages: English and French www.catacconference.org

The biennial CATaC conference series ­ 10 years old in 2008! ­ provides a premier international forum for current research on how diverse cultural attitudes shape the implementation and use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The conference series brings together scholars from around the globe who provide diverse cultural and disciplinary perspectives in their presentations and discussions of the conference theme and topics (listed below). (more…)