Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

CFP: Making Meaning from Data

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Abstracts are invited for the Digital Classics Association colloquium at SCS / AIA Annual Meetings in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 8-11, 2015.

[[ reposted from http://apaclassics.org/annual-meeting/146/cfp-making-meaning-data ]]

Sponsored by the Digital Classics Association
Organizers: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY; Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Jeffrey Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri Kansas-City

Digital techniques hold the promise of providing a consistent and comprehensive basis for the interpretation of classical culture, yet they also raise significant questions of method. Do digital approaches lead us away from certain kinds of interpretation and toward others? How does the quantitative and aggregate nature of argumentation common to digital humanities relate to other modes of understanding the ancient world? Papers are invited for this session that reflect theoretically on the study and understanding of classical antiquity in light of the growing importance of digital methods. Participants may take as their object material any aspect of classical culture, including, but not limited to: history, language, literature, material and visual culture, and philosophy.

Anonymous abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent to digitalclassicsassociation@gmail.com, with identifying information in the email. Abstracts will be refereed anonymously by three readers in accordance with APA regulations. In your email, please confirm that you are an APA member in good standing. Abstracts should follow the formatting guidelines of the instructions for individual abstracts on the APA website. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 5 p.m. Eastern Time, February 3, 2014.

Contact: Neil Coffee, University at Buffalo, SUNY, ncoffee@buffalo.edu

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, January 6th, 2014

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014. (Note new deadline.)

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: www.digitalclassicist.org/wip

Publishing Text for a Digital Age

Friday, December 6th, 2013

March 27-30, 2014
Tufts University
Medford MA
perseus_neh (at) tufts.edu
http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/2014-workshop/

Call for contributions!

As a follow-on to Working with Text in a Digital Age, an NEH-funded Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities and in collaboration with the Open Philology Project at the University of Leipzig, Tufts University announces a two-day workshop on publishing textual data that is available under an open license, that is structured for machine analysis as well as human inspection, and that is in a format that can be preserved over time. The purpose of this workshop is to establish specific guidelines for digital publications that publish and/or annotate textual sources from the human record. The registration for the workshop will be free but space will be limited. Some support for travel and expenses will be available. We particularly encourage contributions from students and early-career researchers.

Textual data can include digital versions of traditional critical editions and translations but such data also includes annotations that make traditional tasks (such as looking up or quoting a primary source) machine-actionable, annotations that may build upon print antecedents (e.g., dynamic indexes of places that can be used to generate maps and geospatial visualizations), and annotations that are only feasible in a digital space (such as alignments between source text and translation or exhaustive markup of morphology, syntax, and other linguistic features).

Contributions can be of two kinds:

  1. Collections of textual data that conform to existing guidelines listed below. These collections must include a narrative description of their contents, how they were produced and what audiences and purposes they were designed to serve.
  2. Contributions about formats for publication. These contributions must contain sufficient data to illustrate their advantages and to allow third parties to develop new materials.

All textual data must be submitted under a Creative Commons license. Where documents reflect a particular point of view by a particular author and where the original expression should for that reason not be changed, they may be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All other contributions must be distributed under a CC-BY-SA license. Most publications may contain data represented under both categories: the introduction to an edition or a data set, reflecting the reasons why one or more authors made a particular set of decisions, can be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All data sets (such as geospatial annotation, morphosyntactic analyses, reconstructed texts with textual notes, diplomatic editions, translations) should be published under a CC-BY-SA license.

Contributors should submit abstracts of up to 500 words to EasyChair. We particularly welcome abstracts that describe data already available under a Creative Commons license. 

Dates:

January 1, 2014:  Submissions are due. Please submit via EasyChair.

January 20, 2014:  Notification.

DCSB 2013/2014: programme now online

Monday, October 7th, 2013

We are glad to announce to the community that this year’s #DigiClass Berlin seminar programme has now been published:

All seminars will be video recorded and the videos, as well as the slides, will be available from the programme page.

Digital Humanities in new lecture series on history and pubs

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

A new lecture series on history of beer/wine/pubs is starting in London, and the inaugural paper, 18:00 on August 28th,  is from Digital Humanities scholar Harvey Quamen explaining why databases, prosopography and digital mapping are useful for the scholar of the history of brewing (an argument that can of course be extended to all modern history, and for that matter ancient). From the original announcement:

Three major questions—all difficult to answer—prompt this talk:

  1. what caused the sudden demise of porter around 1820?
  2. how did the style called India Pale Ale spread so rapidly?
  3. can we locate the historical London breweries?

Although surrounded in some mystery, these questions might be answerable using some techniques from the digital humanities. In particular, building a database of historical recipes will help us understand the movement and growth of beer styles (especially as those styles moved through homebrewing) and we can begin to track master-apprenticeship relationships with the use of propopographies, databases that serve as “collective biographies” of groups of people. Finally, using historical maps (like the Agas map digitized at the Map of Early Modern London project), we might begin to reconstruct the historical distribution of beer around the capital.

The series will focus on archaeology and history, so more future papers may be of more direct interest to the #DigiClass community too.

Digital Classicist London Videocasts

Friday, August 16th, 2013

The videocasts for all the 2013 Digital Classicist London summer seminars are now available online at the Seminar Programme page. Each presentation is available as a downloadable or streamable video (MP4), or, for those who prefer audio, as MP3. Slideshows have also been made available in PDF format, although these are generally included in the video as well. Users can receive updates to the series, including videos from the London, Berlin, and occasional other seminars, by subscribing to the Seminar RSS Feed, or following @Stoaorg on Twitter.

Many thanks to our excellent videographer Wilma Stefani for filming and editing the videos, and to all our speakers for permission to share their presentations and slides.

(Thanks also to Christina Kamposiori, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale who helped with the organization and management of the seminars every week.)

Last call for abstracts: Leipzig eHumanities seminar

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

(more…)

Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

CFP: Digital Classicist Berlin

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Proposals with abstracts for the winter 2013/2014 Digital Classicst Seminar Berlin are due September 1, 2013. See the full Digital Classicist Berlin call for papers for instructions.

Digital.Humanities @ Oxford Summer School

Monday, June 10th, 2013

Noted on the Digital Classicist list:

The Digital.Humanities @ Oxford Summer School (DHOxSS) is an annual event for anyone working in the Digital Humanities. This year’s Summer School will be held on 8 – 12 July, at the University of Oxford. If you are a researcher, project manager, research assistant, or student of the Humanities, this is an opportunity for you to learn about the tools and methodology of digital humanities, and to make contact with others in your field. You will be introduced to topics spanning from creating, managing, analysing, modelling, visualizing, to publication of digital data for the Humanities. Visit http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/2013/ for more information.

With the DHOxSS’s customisable schedule, you book on one of our five-day workshops, and supplement this by booking several guest lectures from experts in their fields.

The main five-day training workshops this year are:

1. Cultural Connections: exchanging knowledge and widening participation in the Humanities
2. How to do Digital Humanities: Discovery, Analysis and Collaboration
3. A Humanities Web of Data: publishing, linking and querying on the semantic web.
4. An Introduction to XML and the Text Encoding Initiative
5. An Introduction to XSLT for Digital Humanists

There are a variety of evening events including a peer-reviewed poster session to give delegates a chance to demonstrate their work to the other delegates and speakers. The Thursday evening sees an elegant drinks reception and three-course banquet at historic Queen’s College, Oxford! (Well worth it!)

DHOxSS is a collaboration for Digital.Humanities @ Oxford between the University of Oxford’s IT Services, the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC), the Bodleian Libraries, and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities.

If you have questions, then email us at courses@it.ox.ac.uk for answers.
More details at: http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/2013/

James Cummings,
Director of DHOxSS

CFP: Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions

Friday, June 7th, 2013

Noted on the Antiquist list:

CALL FOR PAPERS
Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions (CRMEX)
http://www.ontotext.com/CRMEX

26th September 2013 in Valetta, Malta

A workshop affiliated with the 17th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL 2013)
http://www.tpdl2013.info/

Background and Objectives

The CIDOC CRM (international standard ISO 21127:2006) is a conceptual model and ontology with a fundamental role in many data integration efforts in the Digital Libraries and Cultural Heritage (CH) domain. It has spawned various CRM-compliant extensions, such as:

  • Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBRoo) for works and bibliographic data –
  • CRM Digitization (CRMdig) for digitization and provenance
  • CRM for English Heritage (CRMEH) for archaeology
  • British Museum Ontology (BMO) for museum objects
  • Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (SAWS) for medieval gnomologia (collections of wise sayings)
  • PRESSoo, a FRBRoo extension for serial publications (more…)

CFP: CAA2014 Paris Conference

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Seen on the Antiquist list:

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

You are warmly invited to take part in the CAA2014 Paris Conference, which will be held at the “Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne – Institut d’art et d’archéologie” 3 rue Michelet, 75006 Paris, France, from 22th to 25th April 2014.

The CAA (Computers Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology) is an international congress which has taken place every year for 40 years, the last being in Australia. This conference usually brings together hundreds of participants and works on the principle of parallel sessions and workshops or roundtables. (more…)

Seminar: Hestia 2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Via Leif Isaksen on the Digital Classicist list:

Dear all,

The AHRC-funded Hestia project is pleased to announce “Hestia2:
Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources”, a one-day seminar
on spatial network analysis and linked data in Classical studies,
archaeology and cultural heritage.

The seminar will be held at The University of Southampton on 18 July.
Registration for this event is free, but we do recommend registering
as early as possible since the number of available places is limited.
More information, including abstracts and registration, can be found
via the following link: http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/hestia-2013/

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Southampton!

Elton Barker, Stefan Bouzarovski, Leif Isaksen and Tom Brughmans (more…)

Lecture: Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Via Simon Mahony:

The first of this Summer’s Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies seminars is this Friday.

Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton)
‘Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models’

Friday June 7 at 16:30
Room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Are lines of sight between Roman towns important for explaining their location? Through a case study on visibility patterns between urban settlements in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain, this paper will discuss how Exponential Random Graph Models (ERGM) can help explore hypothetical past processes of interaction and site location. With these models the frequency of certain subnetworks in random networks and the empirically attested network is compared, to examine the probability that the subnetworks might have emerged through random processes. This paper will critically evaluate the potential and limitations of such an approach for archaeology.

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

All are welcome

The full 2013 programme is at <http://digiclass.cch.kcl.ac.uk/wip/wip2013.html>

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

The programme for the Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013 is now published (the abstracts will be added very soon). Please circulate this via your networks. We have, for several years, been recording these seminars and making the audio files available on our seminar webpage. This year we will be recording video and so presentation slides, audio and video files will be available after each seminar.

The programme flyer can be downloaded as a PDF.

All seminars are on Fridays at 16:30 at Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU.

  • June 7: Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton) Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models
  • June 14: Valeria Vitale (King’s College London) An Ontology for 3D Visualization in Cultural Heritage
  • June 21: Tom Cheesman (University of Swansea) Putting Translations To Work: TransVis
  • June 28: Adrian Ryan (University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa) Quantifying stylistic distance between Athenian vase-paintings
  • July 5: Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania) The Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance: a federated platform for discovery and research
  • July 12: 16:30: Eleni Bozia (University of Florida) The Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project
    17:30: Greta Franzini (University College London) A catalogue of digital editions: Towards an edition of Augustine’s City of God
  • July 19: Federico Boschetti ( ILC-CNR, Pisa) & Bruce Robertson (Mount Allison, Canada) An Integrated System For Generating And Correcting Polytonic Greek OCR
  • July 26: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University) Teaching with the Perseids Platform: Tools and methods
  • August 2: Neel Smith (College of the Holy Cross) Scholarly reasoning and writing in an automatically assembled and tested digital library
  • August 9: Agnes Thomas, Francesco Mambrini & Matteo Romanello (DAI, Berlin) Insights in the World of Thucydides: The Hellespont Project as a research environment for Digital History

Classical Association 2014: Call for Papers: ‘New Approaches to e-Learning in Classics’

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Following on from wide interest shown in this topic at the Classical Association 2013 Conference, it is proposed that similar panels on e-Learning be convened for CA 2014. Papers are sought on topics relating to the use of e-learning in Classical subjects, including Latin, Greek, Classical Civilisation and Ancient History. The organisers are keen to encourage the submission of papers presenting the innovative use of new technologies, as well as discussion papers on the current state of theory and practice in e-Learning for Classics. The scope of this panel covers the educational sector as a whole, from Primary level through to Higher Education.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words will need to be submitted for consideration by the end of August. Please contact panel organiser Bartolo Natoli by email (bnatoli@utexas.edu) or tweet/DM (@banatoli) if you would like to be involved.

HESTIA2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

Copied from the Digital Classicist list on behalf of the organisers:

CALL FOR PAPERS

HESTIA2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

University of Southampton 18th July 2013
Organisers: Elton Barker, Stefan Bouzarovski, Leif Isaksen and Tom Brughmans, in collaboration with The Connected Past
http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/

A free one-day seminar on spatial network analysis in archaeology, history, classics, teaching and commercial archaeology.

Spatial relationships are everywhere in our sources about the past: from the ancient roads that connect cities, or ancient authors mentioning political alliances between places, to the stratigraphic contexts archaeologists deal with in their fieldwork. However, as datasets about the past become increasingly large, these spatial networks become ever more difficult to disentangle. Network techniques allow us to address such spatial relationships explicitly and directly through network visualisation and analysis. This seminar aims to explore the potential of such innovative techniques for research, public engagement and commercial purposes.

The seminar is part of Hestia2, a public engagement project aimed at introducing a series of conceptual and practical innovations to the spatial reading and visualisation of texts. Following on from the AHRC-funded “Network, Relation, Flow: Imaginations of Space in Herodotus’s Histories” (Hestia: http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/hestia/ ), Hestia2 represents a deliberate shift from experimenting with geospatial analysis of a single text to making Hestia’s outcomes available to new audiences and widely applicable to other texts through a seminar series, online platform, blog and learning materials with the purpose of fostering knowledge exchange between researchers and non-academics, and generating public interest and engagement in this field.

For this first Hestia2 workshop we welcome contributions addressing any of (but not restricted to) the following themes:

Spatial network analysis techniques
Spatial networks in archaeology, history and classics
Techniques for the discovery and analysis of networks from textual sources
Exploring spatial relationships in classical and archaeological sources
The use of network visualisations and linked datasets for archaeologists active in the commercial sector and teachers
Applications of network analysis in archaeology, history and classics

Please email proposed titles and abstracts (max. 250 words) to:
t.brughmans@soton.ac.uk by May 13th 2013.

Report on Digital Classics panel, Classical Association 2013

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

(Report by Bartolo Natoli on the digital classics panel, April 6, 2013.)

Last week, I had the privilege of participating in the Classical Association Annual Conference at the University of Reading, UK. One of the panels that I attended struck me as particularly intriguing and important in today’s world of Higher Education: the Digital Classics panel. In fact, at the same time at which the CA Conference was occurring, the first annual Digital Classics Association Conference was happening at the University of Buffalo, a fact that further underlines the growing importance of this emerging side of Classics. (more…)

Report on e-learning panel, Classical Association 2013

Saturday, April 6th, 2013

(Report by Bartolo Natoli on the e-learning panel, April 5, 2013.)

Earlier today, the Classical Association’s Annual Conference, hosted by the University of Reading, presented two panels on ‘New Approaches to e-Learning’, a topic of growing interest in Classical Studies. The two panels boasted papers full of insights and suggestions for incorporating educational technology into both Latin and Classical Civilization classes. The first panel, consisting of papers by Jonathan Eaton and Alex Smith, focused more on how technology could be employed in classroom instruction on a macro-level. Eaton’s talk provided examples of how Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) could be used to enhance student learning and touched on the controversial topic of massive open online courses (MOOCs). Eaton suggested that VLEs be used to offer resources to students asynchronically, whereas evaluation and direct instruction be employed in a f2f setting: blended learning was a key means of maximizing learning potential. An example of such blended learning was Alex Smith’s discussion of using technology to provide students with collaborative and higher-level learning activities based on synthesis through the creation of a website in eXeLearning that was based on set lines of Latin. Students worked through both Latin content and 21st century, real-world skills such as collaboration and web design. Technology provided the medium, but was not the goal. (more…)

Bursaries available for London EpiDoc training, April 2013

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

A reminder that we are inviting applications for a training event in digital encoding of epigraphy and papyrology at the Institute for Classical Studies, London, April 22-5, 2013 (see full announcement). Thanks to the generosity of the British Epigraphy Society and Society for Promotion of Roman Studies, we now have a limited number of bursaries available to assist students with attending this workshop.

If you would like to apply for financial support in attending the EpiDoc workshop, please note in your application email that you would like to be considered for a bursary, approximately how much you expect the trip to cost you, and what other sources of funding you have. If you have already applied for the training, please just send an additional email asking to be considered, and we’ll add a note to this effect to your application. A decision will be made shortly after the closing date on March 1st.

Digital Classicist London 2013: Call for Papers

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

The Digital Classicist London seminar series, which provides a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital research methods, invites submissions for Summer 2013.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, semantics and linguistics, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, information science and serious gaming, although this list is by no means exhaustive. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in ancient studies. Presentations should have an academic research agenda relevant both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists.

The seminars will run on Friday afternoons at 16:30, from June to early August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London. There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but please enquire if you’re coming from further afield).

To submit a paper for consideration for the Digital Classicist London Seminars, please email an abstract of 300-500 words to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk, by midnight UTC on March 22nd, 2013.

More information will be found at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2013.html

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 22-25, 2013

Friday, January 11th, 2013

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital text-markup for epigraphic and papyrological editing, to be held in the Institute for Classical Studies, London and supported by the British Epigraphy Society and Society for Promotion of Roman Studies. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), James Cowey (Heidelberg), Simona Stoyanova (KCL) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and Curse Tablets from Roman Britain, Pandektis (inscriptions of Macedonia and Thrace), and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML and markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object description in EpiDoc as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required to apply, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday March 1st, 2013.

Workshop on Canonical Text Services: Furman May 19-22, 2013

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

Posted for Christopher Blackwell:

What · With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Furman University’s Department of Classics is offering a workshop on the Canonical Text Services Protocol.

When · May 19 – 22, 2013.

Where · Greenville, South Carolina, (Wikipedia); Furman University.

Who · Applications will be accepted from anyone interested in learning about exposing canonically cited texts online with CTS. We have funds to pay for travel and lodging for six participants.

How · Apply by e-mail to christopher.blackwell@furman.edu by January 31, 2013.

For more information, see http://folio.furman.edu/workshop.html or contact christopher.blackwell@furman.edu

Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Lecture announcement: http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/news/index.html#sep27

September 27, 2012
Lecture: “Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy.” John W. Hessler, Kluge Staff Fellow.
4:00 – 5:00 p.m., LJ-119, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress. Reception to follow.

Abstract

How accurately have culturally fundamental texts from literature, law, science, geography, and philosophy been handed down from ancient Rome and Greece to the present by way of scribal copying in the Middle Ages?  This fundamental question of how various manuscripts from a textual tradition have been transmitted through space and time has been the concern of scholars since at least the founding of the great Library of Alexandria in the third century BC.

Early Medieval scribes recognized that in the process of copying ancient texts mistakes were made, and that these errors became part of the textual tradition, to be passed on through history. They also realized that this process of copying error had a random or chaotic nature, and so they invented the demon Tutivillus, whom they considered to be the error’s source. Throughout the Renaissance scholars, like Erasmus, battled this demon in their attempts to re-construct important Latin and Greek manuscripts descended from antiquity. Later in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries scholars, like Karl Lachmann and Paul Krüger, tried to systematize a method in order to determine which parts of medieval manuscripts were errors, and which were the real readings descended from the original authors.

This paper will highlight a new computational technique to show how modern digital philology is changing the way we think of the transmission of medieval manuscripts through space and time, and is also helping to solve this seemingly simple, but unfortunately, rather complicated problem. Using the notes of the classical philologist Paul Krüger, whose manuscripts were recently rediscovered in the Law Library of Congress, complex three dimensional visualization techniques will be used to show how the medieval manuscripts making up the Codex of Justinian are spatially and temporally related to each other. This talk will also highlight how these new techniques give scholars the tools to postulate what the structure of missing and destroyed manuscripts might have been.  Using these methods, based in lattice theory and information entropy, this paper can be seen as a case study in how digital and computational algorithms are changing the face of even the most traditional of the humanities, classical philology.

The results of this study and my year long Kluge Fellowship will be published in the book  called, Roman Law in Ruins: a Computational Study of the Medieval Transmission of Justinian’s Codex. This has been made possible through a generous grant from the American Academy in Rome and it will be published copyright free both in hardcover and on the web by Franz-Steiner Verlag (Berlin) in February, 2014 as part of their Alte Geschichte Monograph Series.

BSR conference support scheme

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Forwarded for Eleanor Murkett:

28 September deadline for proposals for the new BSR Conference Support Scheme Competition 2013-2014

Proposals for 2013-14 are currently being accepted for the BSR’s new Conference Support Scheme. This provides support for promising novel research on Rome and Italy. The scheme reflects the BSR’s longstanding commitment to promoting interdisciplinary research and its main aim is to provide support for genuinely interdisciplinary landmark conferences which will foster collaborative relationships with universities and research centres.

Please make sure your application reaches us by the deadline of 16.00 on Friday 28 September 2012

For further information about the Scheme please go to the BSR Conferences page at http://www.bsr.ac.uk/research/conferences-at-the-bsr/bsr-conference-support-scheme