Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

TRAIL 2011: Training and Research in the Archaeological Interpretation of Lidar

Monday, January 24th, 2011

From Rachel Opitz:

TRAIL 2011 Training and Research in the Archaeological Interpretation of Lidar
14-16 March 2011, European Research Centre at Bibracte, Glux-en-Glenne, France

The objective of these days is to create a forum for discussion for professionals, researchers and students who have previously worked with LiDAR or are currently involved in the preparatory or active phase of a project using LiDAR. The exchanges at this workshop aim to show the potential of the technology for archaeological applications, to discuss possibilities for coordination, method sharing and to outline research perspectives at the European level.

This workshop will be organized in two phases:

  • Two half-day sessions targeted for archaeologists who are not LiDAR specialists but who are interested in the potential archaeological applications;
  • Two half-day sessions targeting archaeologists already familiar with the technology.

Application forms and more information are available from: http://modelter.zrc-sazu.si/ .

Please direct any questions to Rachel Opitz at rachel.opitz@mshe.univ-fcomte.fr.

Digital Classicist Seminar 2011, CFP

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Call for Papers

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars in Summer 2011, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. Themes could include, but are by no means limited to, visualization, information and data linking, digital textual and linguistic studies, and geographic information and network analysis; so long as the content is likely to be of interest both to classicists / ancient historians / archaeologists and information scientists / digital humanists, and would be considered serious research in at least one of those fields.

The seminars run on Friday afternoons (16:30 – 19:00) from June to mid-August in Senate House, London, and are hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (University of London). In previous years collected papers from the Digital Classicist seminars have been published in an online special issue of Digital Medievalist, a printed volume from Ashgate Press, a BICS supplement (in production), and the last three years have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

We have a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by April 15th, 2011. We shall announce the full programme at the end of April.

(Coörganised by Will Wootton, Charlotte Tupman, Matteo Romanello, Simon Mahony, Timothy Hill, Alejandro Giacometti, Juan Garcés, Stuart Dunn & Gabriel Bodard.)

Εἰκονοποιία proceedings online

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

I’m delighted to see that the proceedings of last month’s conference on Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage are now online as an open access PDF.

Download from: http://www.eikonopoiia.org/files/Eikonopoiia-2010-Proceedings.pdf

There was an impressive line-up at this important conference, and I was sorry not to be able to attend. This collection of papers will be incredibly useful to anyone working in the imaging of manuscripts and other textual objects. (Now if only I could also have a hardcopy for my bookshelf!)

(Thanks to for pointing this out on Twitter)

What is Web 2.0?

Monday, October 25th, 2010

This blog post is the introduction to a lecture on Publishing and Web 2.0 I am delivering to students on the Digital Humanities MA, and is partly intended as a venue for online discussion in the comments section. All are welcome to join in the discussion.

When I posted the question, “What is Web 2.0?” on Twitter at the weekend, the first reply was from @espenore, who wrote:

A buzzword 10 years ago :-)

Leading me to muse:

Does this mean that 2004′s “Web 2.0″ is 2010′s “The Web”?

More seriously, most online definitions of Web 2.0 focus on the dynamic nature of Web content:

“The second generation of the World Wide Web, especially the movement away from static webpages to dynamic and shareable content and social networking”
(Wiktionary)

and

“Web 2.0 does not refer to any specific change in the technology of the Internet, but rather the behavior of how people use the Internet”
(Twinity)

and

“Le web 2.0 se caractérise principalement par la prise de pouvoir des internautes”
(Novaterra)

The idea that the Web is not controlled by a top-down, monolithic publishing industry, but an organic, uncontrolled, intelligent network authored and edited by all users is a powerful one. (On of the nicest descriptions of this is The Machine is Us/ing Us [video].) There is a lot of monolithic content on the Web, of course, and this is sometimes among the more professional and reliable material out there, but almost every web search returns pages from Wikipedia and blogs high in the results list.

It has become the norm to see the Web as a place to post content, to add comments, to correct errors and omissions (or introduce errors and misinformation). Obviously, this is no longer about new technology or tools; all this dynamic functionality has been around for a long time (in Internet terms) and is both the norm and visible on the vast majority of the Web, so the rhetoric of “version 2.0″ is broken. Rather it is a subset of the kind of activity that takes place on the Web: leaving comments rather than just reading news; editing rather than just reading Wikipedia; reviewing rather than just buying books; even searching the Web with cookies enabled.

In this lecture we’re going to discuss the implications of this dynamic and semantic Web on publishing, and especially academic output. We’ll look at a few examples of blogs (The Stoa Consortium, AH Net, DH Now), wikis (Digiclass, Academic Publishing, Uncyclopedia), and talk about the kinds of scholarly activities that are appropriate to publishing in these media.

Watch the comments to see how convincing this all turned out to be.

(My slides for this class are available as an Open Access Google presentation.)

DH PhD studentship at the Open University

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

Forwarded for Elton Barker, who would be happy to answer any queries:

One full-time, three year PhD studentship available from 1 January 2011
Interdisciplinary PhD Studentship in Digital Humanities
Open University – Faculty of Arts
Based in Milton Keynes

Digital Humanities at The Open University is a rapidly growing area of research. The proposed studentship is aimed at exploring the application of geographical concepts to research in the Arts and Humanities, and the ways in which they are represented, in the digital medium. We would welcome applications from candidates with an appropriate research proposal in any discipline studied in The Open University Faculty of Arts, ie Art History, Classical Studies, English, History, Music, Philosophy and Religious Studies.

Projects which will benefit from supervision across traditional disciplinary boundaries are particularly encouraged. Also encouraged are proposals with links to one of our existing research groups or collaborative projects.

For FURTHER PARTICULARS go to: http://www3.open.ac.uk/employment/job-details.asp?id=5367

Further details of Digital Humanities-related research at The Open University can be found at http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/digital-humanities/index.shtml

CFP: 14. Kongress für Griechische und Lateinische Epigraphik 2012 in Berlin

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

Posted on behalf of Marcus Dohnicht.

Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren,
liebe Kolleginnen und Kollegen,

der 14. Internationale Kongress für Griechische und Lateinische Epigraphik wird auf Einladung der Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin in Verbindung mit dem Deutschen Archäologischen Institut vom 27. bis zum 31. August 2012 in Berlin stattfinden. Die Internetseite des Kongresses ist unter

http://www.congressus2012.de

zu erreichen. Über den jeweils neuesten Stand der Kongressvorbereitung wird mit einem Newsletter informiert werden. Bitte melden Sie uns unter

http://www.congressus2012.de/de/newsletter.html

dass Sie den Newsletter erhalten wollen; auf diese Weise erhalten wir auch ihre neueste E-Mail Adresse. Die Anmeldung für den Newsletter ist noch keine Anmeldung zum Kongress.

Wir wären Ihnen sehr dankbar, wenn Sie diese E-Mail an alle Interessenten und Institutionen weiterleiten würden, besonders an jüngere Kollegen und solche, die über keinen eigenen E-Mail-Anschluß verfügen. Falls diese uns entsprechend schreiben, werden wir ihnen die Informationen auf normalem postalischem Weg zusenden.

Wir bitten um Entschuldigung, falls Sie diese E-Mail mehrfach erhalten sollten.

In der Hoffnung, dass sehr viele von Ihnen unserer Einladung nachkommen, mit freundlichen Grüßen
Werner Eck

Digital Technology at Congrès Internationale de Papyrologie

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

As noted here a few weeks ago, there is a remarkable number of panels on Digital Technology and the Tools of the Trade at the 26e Congrès international de papyrologie, which takes place this week in Geneva, Switzerland. Earlier this week I wrote to both the Digital Classicist and Papyrology lists asking if anyone was planning to blog or live-tweet these sessions. So far all that I’ve come across is:

If anyone else has or intends to blog the conference, or has notes on any of the technology sessions that could be turned into a short report, please post a link in the comments or get in touch.

Digitizing Cultural Heritage (British Museum, Sept 4, 2010)

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Digitising Cultural Heritage

British Museum: Stevenson Lecture Theatre.
Saturday 4th September 2010, 09:55 – 16:30

Digital technology has revolutionised modern work- and social life. It is also transforming cultural heritage management. The power to store, organise and distribute vast quantities of complex data makes possible today things that only 20 years ago were dreams. This study day brings together a selection of projects that embrace the potential of the digital world to broaden and enrich access to mankind’s shared cultural heritage.

The British Museum’s founding philosophy–free access for ‘all studious and curious Persons’–today means not just free entry to the museum in Bloomsbury, but also free access to the collection online. An increasing community of institutions and projects share this philosophy, and the past is no longer such a foreign country.

Programme:
(more…)

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: eHumanities Workshop at 40th Annual Meeting of the German Computer Science Society in Leipzig, Germany

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

Marco Büchler asked me to post the following notice:

Workshop: eHumanities – How does computer science benefit?
Organiser: Prof. Gerhard Heyer and Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing / CS, University of Leipzig)

SPECIAL HINT:
————————–
The workshop is compiled NOT only by presentations of computer scientists BUT researchers from humanities and infrastructure as well. HUMANISTS ARE VERY WELCOME!!!

Dates:
———
Conference Sept. 27th – Oct. 1st, 2010
eHumanities workshop: Thursday Sept. 30th.

Registration details:
——————————–
**Early bird registration:  July 30th, 2010**
Registration page: http://www.informatik2010.de/480.html

Workshop description:
————————————
In recent years the text-based humanities and social sciences experienced a synthesis between the increasing availability of digitized texts and algorithms from the fields of information retrieval and text mining that resulted in novel tools for text processing and analysis, and enabled entirely new questions and innovative methodologies.

The goal of this workshop is to investigate which consequences and potentials for computer science have emerged in turn from the digitization of the social sciences and humanities.

(more…)

Papyrology and technology

Monday, July 5th, 2010

(Thanks to Gregg Schwendner for posting the papyrological congress programme at What’s New in Papyrology.)

Thursday August 19th, morning
88. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND TOOLS OF THE TRADE I Adam Bülow-Jacobsen  presiding
89. Herwig Maehler Die Zukunft der griechischen Papyrologie
90. Bart Van Beek Papyri in bits & bytes – electronic texts and how to use them
91. Marius Gerhardt Papyrus Portal Deutschland

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND TOOLS OF THE TRADE I Roger Bagnall  presiding
101. Reinhold Scholl Textmining  und Papyri
102. Herbert Verreth Topography of Egypt online

107. Joshua Sosin / James Cowey Digital papyrology : a new platform for collaborative control of DDbDP, HGV, and APIS data Plenary session in Room MR080 (1 hour)

Friday August 20th, morning
DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND TOOLS OF THE TRADE II Rodney Ast presiding
133. Giovanna Menci Utilità di un database di alfabeti per lo studio della scrittura greca dei papiri
134. Marie-Hélène Marganne Les extensions du fichier Mertens-Pack3 du CEDOP AL
135. Robert Kraft Imaging the papyri collection at the University of Pennsylvania Museum (Philadelphia PA, USA)

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND TOOLS OF THE TRADE III James Cowey presiding
146. Roger T. Macfarlane / Stephen M. Bay Multi-Spectral Imaging and Papyrology : Advantages and Limitations
147. Adam Bülow-Jacobsen Digital infrared photography of papyri and ostraca

So this astonishingly rich programme of digital topics at the International Papyrological Congress this year makes me wonder: what would it take to get this much digital interest at a major epigraphic meeting, or the annual Classics meetings, for that matter? (A couple of Digital Classicist panels at recent APA/AIA and CA conferences notwithstanding–there’s nothing as diverse and in-the-wild as the above at any Classics conference I’ve been to in recent years.) Can we do anything about this with top-down encouragement, or does it have to be a natural ground-swell? Or is papyrology just a naturally more technical subdiscipline than the rest of Classics?

Digital Classicist 2010 seminars

Monday, May 24th, 2010

Digital Classicist 2010 summer seminar programme
Institute of Classical Studies

Meetings are on Fridays at 16:30
in room STB9 (Stewart House)
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

*ALL WELCOME*
Seminars will be followed by refreshments

  • Jun 4 Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
    Reading Between the Lines: unearthing structure in Ptolemy’s Geography
  • Jun 11 Hafed Walda (King’s College London) and Charles Lequesne (RPS Group)
    Towards a National Inventory for Libyan Archaeology
  • Jun 18 Timothy Hill (King’s College London)  
    After Prosopography? Data modelling, models of history, and new directions for a scholarly genre.
  • Jun 25 Matteo Romanello (King’s College London)       
    Towards a Tool for the Automatic Extraction of Canonical References
  • Jul 2 Mona Hess (University College London)  
    3D Colour Imaging For Cultural Heritage Artefacts
  • Jul 16 Annemarie La Pensée (National Conservation Centre) and Françoise Rutland (World Museum Liverpool)
    Non-contact 3D laser scanning as a tool to aid identification and interpretation of archaeological artefacts: the case of a Middle Bronze Age Hittite Dice
  • Jul 23 Mike Priddy (King’s College London)
    On-demand Virtual Research Environments: a case study from the Humanities
  • Jul 30 Monica Berti (Torino) and Marco Büchler (Leipzig)
    Fragmentary Texts and Digital Collections of Fragmentary Authors
  • Aug 6 Kathryn Piquette (University College London)
    Material Mediates Meaning: Exploring the artefactuality of writing utilising qualitative data analysis software
  • Aug 13 Linda Spinazzè (Venice)
    Musisque Deoque. Developing new features: manuscripts tracing on the net

For more information on individual seminars and updates on the programme, see http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010.html

TEI Annual Meeting: Call for Papers

Monday, May 10th, 2010

Deadline extended to May 15, see original call.

DH2010 and workshops

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

Registration for the 2010 Digital Humanities conference (July 7-10, 2010, King’s College London) is now open (http://dh2010.cch.kcl.ac.uk/registration.html).

In addition to the conference programme, seven workshops are offered between July 5-7. All are free for conference attendees.

  • Access to the Grid: Interfacing the Humanities with Grid technologies (Stuart Dunn)
  • Text Mining in the Digital Humanities (Marco Buechler et al., eAQUA Project)
  • Service-Oriented Computing in the Humanities (Nicolas Gold et al.)
  • Content, Compliance, Collaboration and Complexity: Creating and Sustaining Information (Joanne Evans et al.)
  • Designing a Digital Humanities Lab (Angela Veomett et al.)
  • Peer Reviewing Digital Archives: the NINES model (Dana Wheeles et al.)
  • Introduction to Text Analysis using JiTR and Voyeur (Stéfan Sinclair et al.)

To find out more about these workshops, see Workshop Programme.

TEI Call for Papers

Monday, March 1st, 2010

Call for proposals
2010 Annual Meeting of the TEI Consortium

TEI Applied: Digital Texts and Language Resources

http://ling.unizd.hr/~tei2010/

  • Meeting dates: Thu 11 November to Sun 14 November, 2010
  • Workshop dates: Mon 08 November to Wed 10 November, 2010

The Program Committee of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium invites individual paper proposals, panel sessions, poster sessions, and tool demonstrations particularly, but not exclusively, on digital texts, language resources and any topic that applies TEI to its research.
(more…)

III Incontro di Filologia Digitale (Verona, March 3-5)

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

Posted for Roberto Rosselli del Turco:

III Incontro di Filologia Digitale – Verona 3-5 marzo 2010
Sala Conferenze
Banco Popolare di Verona
Via san Cosimo, 10 Verona

Conference Programme

Mercoledì 3 marzo 2010

14.30 Saluti delle Autorità
15.00 Apertura dei lavori

15.00-15.45 Federico Giusfredi / Alfredo Rizza (Hethitisches Wörterbuch, Institut für Assyriologie und Hethitologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Dep. of Linguistics, UCB, Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholar)
Zipf’s Law and the Distribution of Signs

15.45-16.30 Manuela Anelli / Marta Muscariello / Giulia Sarullo (Istituto di Scienze dell’Uomo, del Linguaggio e dell’Ambiente, Libera Università di Lingue e Comunicazione IULM, Milano)
The Digital Edition of Epigraphic Texts as Research Tool: the ILA Project

16.30-17.15 Margherita Farina (Dipartimento di Scienze Storiche del Mondo Antico, Università di Pisa)
Electronic analysis and organization of the Syro-Turkic Inscriptions of China and Central Asia (more…)

Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

Posting this on behalf of the organisers.

Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage: Technological Challenges and Solutions

The Academy of Finland research unit ‘Ancient Greek written sources’ (CoE) is organizing a symposium “Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage: Technological Challenges and Solutions”. The symposium takes place on 28-29 October, 2010, in Helsinki, Finland.

The programme comprises of two plenary sessions that are open for public, two workshops that are intended for the speakers only, and one open session on end-user perspective.

Participation in the symposium is free of charge (however, registration is compulsory). For the accepted speakers the CoE will be covering the travel and accommodation costs.

We would be grateful if the following short ad could be included in the web site of Digital Classicist to promote our symposium.

Maarit Kinnunen
tel. + 358 50 577 9153
maarit.kinnunen@expericon.fi

============================================

Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage: Technological Challenges and Solutions 28-29 October 2010 in Helsinki, Finland.
Organizer: The Academy of Finland Research Unit “Ancient Greek written sources” (CoE)
Partner: The National Library of Finland
For more information, see www.eikonopoiia.org

Digital Classicist 2010 Seminars CFP

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, with support from the British Library, in Summer 2010 on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that demonstrates interdisciplinarity or work on the intersections between Ancient History, Classics or Archaeology and a digital, technical or practice-based discipline.

The Digital Classicist seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published(*) in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008-9); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series. A small budget is available to help with travel costs.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2010. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Regards,

The organizers

Gabriel Bodard, King’s College London
Stuart Dunn, King’s College London
Juan Garcés, Greek Manuscripts Department, British Library
Simon Mahony, University College London
Melissa Terras, University College London

(more…)

Relationships Between Classics and Museums (Cambridge)

Friday, January 29th, 2010

(While this is not strictly a digital Classics series, the interdisciplinary questions and issues of cultural heritage and curation being discussed ought to be of interest to Stoa readers. If anyone is attending these seminars we would be delighted to post short reports or reactions here.)

Two worlds colliding?: the relationships between Classics and Museums
organised by Dr Kate Cooper, Fitzwilliam Museum

Tuesdays at 4.30pm Room 1.04 Faculty of Classics (Sidgwick Site), Cambridge. All Welcome.

26th January Professor Robin Cormack (Courtauld Institute of Art & Faculty of Classics, Cambridge)
Perspectives from the outside: curating temporary loan exhibitions at the Royal Academy and elsewhere.

2nd February Dr Susan Walker (Keeper of Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum)
Change and flow: the new Ashmolean

9th February Dr Lucilla Burn (Keeper of Antiquities, Fitzwilliam Museum)
How do the Greek and Roman collections of the Fitzwilliam Museum and their display relate to the study of Classics?

16th February Dr Andrew Burnett (Deputy Director, The British Museum)
International issues and museums today

23rd February Dr Roger Bland (Head of the Department of Portable Antiquities and Treasure, The British Museum)
A license to loot or archaeological rescue? The Portable Antiquities Scheme in England and Wales

2nd March Dr Timothy Potts (Director, The Fitzwilliam Museum)
Museums and the preservation of archaeological heritage: past practice and future prospects

Digital Research and Collaborative Work (APA panel)

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

There was a lot of talk of Digital Humanities at the MLA last week; as Hugh pointed out, though, there seems to be only one explicitly digital panel at our subject meeting, the APA/AIA in Anaheim. However, it should be a good one, and I’d encourage anyone with digital or collaborative interests to make sure and attend. The below is taken from the APA programme, annotated by me:

SECTION 28
Digital Research and Developments in Collaborative Work in Classics
FRIDAY January 8, 11:15 A.M. – 1:15 P.M. Elite Ballroom 3
Gabriel Bodard and Alex Lee, Organizers

The papers in this panel concern themselves with the implications of digital editing on the research process. ‘Editing’ in this context includes the collection, research, sharing, and preparation for publication of textual, historical, or archaeological material. The digital work, which is often seen as a tool en route to creating an online publication, also transforms the editor’s research—both in terms of the speed and the sequence with which we can perform certain tasks, and of the different and new sorts of questions that the data throws up
for us to consider.

1. Valentina Asciutti & Stuart Dunn, King’s College London
Mapping Evidence for Roman Regionalism and Regional Literacy in Roman Britain from the Inscribed and Illustrated Objects (20 mins.)
*Read by Sebastian Heath*

2. Gabriel Bodard & Irene Polinskaya, King’s College London
A Digital Edition of IOSPE: Collaboration and Interoperability Enabled by e-Science Methods (20 mins.)
*Read by Tom Elliott*

3. Alex Lee, University of Chicago
Scholarly Editing in the Digital Age: the Archimedes Palimpsest as a Case Study (20 mins.)

Although two of the three papers will be read by someone other than their authors, the readers are themselves experts in closely related areas, and Alex, Tom and Sebastian (and other expert attendees, to be announced) will be conducting a round table discussion on the subject of digital research and collaboration for the remaining time of the session.

Spacial Analysis in Archaeology (seminars)

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Contemporary Roles for Spatial Analysis in Archaeology

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Seminar Series (January–March 2010)
31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
Mondays 4pm, Room 612 (followed by a wine reception)

Timetable

11 January 2010 – Benjamin Ducke (Oxford Archaeology)
‘Science without software no longer. Archaeological data analysis and the Open Source paradigm’

18 January 2010 – Chris Green (University of Leicester)
‘Temporal GIS and archaeology’

25 January 2010 – Tony Wilkinson (Durham University)
‘From household to region: incorporating agency into the interpretation of regional settlement’

1 February 2010 – Tim Williams (University College London)
‘Earth viewers and GIS in archaeological resource management: access and accessibility’

8 February 2010 – Luke Premo (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary
Anthropology)
‘A spatially explicit model of Early Stone Age archaeological landscapes’

15 February 2010 (Reading Week – no seminar)

22 February 2010 – Frederic Fol Leymarie (Goldsmiths College)
‘Advances in 3D procedural modelling with applications to archaeology’

1 March 2010 – Michael Barton (Arizona State University)
‘Stories of the past or science of the future? Archaeology and computational social science’

8 March 2010 – Irmela Herzog (Archaeological Heritage Management of the Rhineland)
‘Patterns of movement, least cost paths and our understanding of the archaeological record’

15 March 2010 – Kate Devlin (Goldsmiths College)
‘Illuminating virtual reconstructions of past environments’

22 March 2010 – Mark Lake (University College London)
‘Rewind and fast‐forward: how archaeological GIS analyses recapitulate general theory’

2010 DHO Summer School with NINES and EpiDoc

Monday, December 7th, 2009

2010 DHO Summer School
in conjunction with NINES and the EpiDoc Collaborative

28 June – 2 July, 2010
http://dho.ie/ss2010

The third annual Digital Humanities Observatory (DHO) Summer School will take place in Dublin from 28 June to 2 July 2010. Following the highly successful 2009 Summer School, next year’s event will see the expansion of popular workshop strands such as:
  • A Practical Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative
  • Data Visualisation for the Humanities
  • An Introduction to EpiDoc Markup and Editing Tools
  • The One to Many Text: Text Transformations with XSLT

The Summer School will feature lectures by Dr. Hugh Denard (King’s College London Visualisation Lab) and Dr Ian Gregory (University of Lancaster). Workshop facilitators include Dr Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Dr James Cowey (University of Heidelberg), Professor Laura Mandell (Miami University of Ohio), Dr Susan Schreibman (Digital Humanities Observatory), Justin Tonra (NUI, Galway) and Dana Wheeles (University of Virginia).

Major workshop strands will be conducted over four days allowing delegates to choose a mini-workshop on Wednesday from one of the following offerings:

  • Geospatial Methods for Humanities Research
  • Using Digital Resources for Irish Research and Teaching
  • Visualising Space, Time and Events: Using Virtual Worlds for Humanities Research
  • Finding the Concepts In the Chaos – Building Relationships With Data Models
  • Planning Digital Scholarly Resources: A Primer

The introduction of the one-day mini-workshops allows people to choose to attend a single-day event only at a reduced cost.

Pre-conference workshops at DH2010

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

As in previous years, the days 3-6 July, before the DH2010 conference (7-11 July at King’s College London <http://www.cch.kcl.ac.uk/dh2010>) have been set aside for community-run workshops. One can reach a diverse and committed body of participants in the Digital Humanities at DH2010. Do you or your project have a workshop up your sleeve that would interest this Digital Humanities community?

Half- or one-day slots are available for workshops, which need to be self-organized and self-funding. KCL can provide space for the workshop at no or low cost, so it is likely that the costs per participant would be low.

We would like to receive proposals for such workshops.

In your full proposal (total 500-800 words), please include:

(1) a brief description of the workshop programme, the project or community out of which it arises, the trainers who will run the workshop, and its proposed length;

(2) what is the demand for this workshop, and who do you expect the audience to be? What minimum number of attendees would be needed for you to do the workshop?

(3) what funding is available or will you seek to help to support the costs of this workshop (for instance, travel for trainers, lunch or refreshments for participants, as applicable)?

A few groups have already expressed interest in running workshops, and we have been talking informally with them. If you have ideas that is not yet fully formed, we would be delighted to e-speak to you about them before you submit a proposal.

The closing date for full proposals will be 31 December 2009. Please send them via email to both John Bradley (john.bradley@kcl.ac.uk) and Gabriel Bodard (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

Forwarded on behalf of Peter Stokes. Note that the following is for students who are registered for PhDs in the United Kingdom.

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age: 17-22 May 2010

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the second year of this AHRC-funded course in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, the Warburg Institute, and King’s College London.

The course is open to arts and humanities doctoral students registered at UK institutions. It involves six days of intensive training on the alysis, description and editing of medieval manuscripts in the digital age to be held jointly in Cambridge and London. Participants will receive a solid theoretical foundation and hands-on experience in cataloguing and editing manuscripts for both print and digital formats.

The first half of the course involves morning classes and then visits to libraries in Cambridge and London in the afternoons. Participants will view original manuscripts and gain practical experience in applying the morning’s themes to concrete examples. In the second half we will address the cataloguing and description of manuscripts in a digital format with particular emphasis on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). These sessions will also combine theoretical principles and practical experience and include supervised work on computers.

The course is aimed principally at those writing dissertations which relate to medieval manuscripts, especially those on literature, art and history. There are no fees, but priority will be given to PhD students funded by the AHRC. Class sizes are limited to twenty and places are ‘first-come-first-served’ so early registration is strongly recommended.

For further details see http://ies.sas.ac.uk/study/mmsda/ or contact
Dr Peter Stokes at mmsda@sas.ac.uk.

Practical Epigraphy Workshop

Monday, November 9th, 2009

Forwarded for Charlotte Tupman.

Practical Epigraphy Workshop

22-24 June 2010, Great North Museum, Newcastle

A Practical Epigraphy Workshop is taking place for those who are interested in developing hands-on skills in working with epigraphic material. The workshop is aimed at graduate students, but other interested parties are welcome to apply, whether or not they have previous experience. With expert tuition, participants will learn the practical aspects of how to record and study inscriptions. The programme will include the making of squeezes; photographing and measuring inscribed stones; and the production of transcriptions, translations and commentaries. Participants may choose to work on Latin or Greek texts.

The course fee is £100 but we hope to be able to provide bursaries to participants to assist with the cost. Accommodation will be extra, but we are arranging B&B nearby for around £30-40.

Places on the workshop are limited and applications will be accepted until 31st March. For further details please contact Dr. Charlotte Tupman: charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk.

The Practical Epigraphy Workshop is sponsored by The British Epigraphy Society, an independent ‘chapter’ of the Association Internationale d’Épigraphie Grecque et Latine:

http://www.csad.ox.ac.uk/BES/

http://www2.bbaw.de/aiegl

Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference (CAA2010)

Monday, October 12th, 2009

Conference: CAA 2010
XXXVIII Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology “Fusion of Cultures”

Conference Dates: April 6-9, 2010
Conference Location: Granada, Spain
URL: http://www.caa2010.org

Upcoming Deadlines:

- Session proposals submission deadline November 15, 2009
- Round tables proposals submission deadline December 15, 2009
- Workshops proposals submission deadline January 31, 2010

Other importat dates:
- Full papers submission will be open on November 20th,2009
- Full papers submission deadline December 15, 2009
- Short papers submission deadline January 31, 2010
- Poster submission deadline January 31, 2010
- Virtual theatre videos submission deadline January 31, 2010

The XXXVIII Annual CAA Conference will be held in Granada, Spain, from April 6 to 9, 2010 and is expected to bring together archaeologist, computer scientist and mathematicians to explore and exchange knowledge in order to enhance our understanding of the past. Classical disciplines like archaeology, anthropology or geography, and more modern ones like computer science, geomatics or museology exchange their most recent advances during the conference.
CAA 2010 is inspired in the concept “Fusion of Cultures” that identifies the scope of the conference and the spirit of the historical city of Granada. The aim of the conference is to create an collaborative atmosphere among all disciplines, by participating via papers, posters, round tables, workshops, short papers and a novel virtual theatre non-stop show. (more…)