Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Spacial Analysis in Archaeology (seminars)

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Contemporary Roles for Spatial Analysis in Archaeology

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Seminar Series (January–March 2010)
31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
Mondays 4pm, Room 612 (followed by a wine reception)

Timetable

11 January 2010 – Benjamin Ducke (Oxford Archaeology)
‘Science without software no longer. Archaeological data analysis and the Open Source paradigm’

18 January 2010 – Chris Green (University of Leicester)
‘Temporal GIS and archaeology’

25 January 2010 – Tony Wilkinson (Durham University)
‘From household to region: incorporating agency into the interpretation of regional settlement’

1 February 2010 – Tim Williams (University College London)
‘Earth viewers and GIS in archaeological resource management: access and accessibility’

8 February 2010 – Luke Premo (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary
Anthropology)
‘A spatially explicit model of Early Stone Age archaeological landscapes’

15 February 2010 (Reading Week – no seminar)

22 February 2010 – Frederic Fol Leymarie (Goldsmiths College)
‘Advances in 3D procedural modelling with applications to archaeology’

1 March 2010 – Michael Barton (Arizona State University)
‘Stories of the past or science of the future? Archaeology and computational social science’

8 March 2010 – Irmela Herzog (Archaeological Heritage Management of the Rhineland)
‘Patterns of movement, least cost paths and our understanding of the archaeological record’

15 March 2010 – Kate Devlin (Goldsmiths College)
‘Illuminating virtual reconstructions of past environments’

22 March 2010 – Mark Lake (University College London)
‘Rewind and fast‐forward: how archaeological GIS analyses recapitulate general theory’

2010 DHO Summer School with NINES and EpiDoc

Monday, December 7th, 2009

2010 DHO Summer School
in conjunction with NINES and the EpiDoc Collaborative

28 June – 2 July, 2010
http://dho.ie/ss2010

The third annual Digital Humanities Observatory (DHO) Summer School will take place in Dublin from 28 June to 2 July 2010. Following the highly successful 2009 Summer School, next year’s event will see the expansion of popular workshop strands such as:
  • A Practical Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative
  • Data Visualisation for the Humanities
  • An Introduction to EpiDoc Markup and Editing Tools
  • The One to Many Text: Text Transformations with XSLT

The Summer School will feature lectures by Dr. Hugh Denard (King’s College London Visualisation Lab) and Dr Ian Gregory (University of Lancaster). Workshop facilitators include Dr Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Dr James Cowey (University of Heidelberg), Professor Laura Mandell (Miami University of Ohio), Dr Susan Schreibman (Digital Humanities Observatory), Justin Tonra (NUI, Galway) and Dana Wheeles (University of Virginia).

Major workshop strands will be conducted over four days allowing delegates to choose a mini-workshop on Wednesday from one of the following offerings:

  • Geospatial Methods for Humanities Research
  • Using Digital Resources for Irish Research and Teaching
  • Visualising Space, Time and Events: Using Virtual Worlds for Humanities Research
  • Finding the Concepts In the Chaos – Building Relationships With Data Models
  • Planning Digital Scholarly Resources: A Primer

The introduction of the one-day mini-workshops allows people to choose to attend a single-day event only at a reduced cost.

Pre-conference workshops at DH2010

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

As in previous years, the days 3-6 July, before the DH2010 conference (7-11 July at King’s College London <http://www.cch.kcl.ac.uk/dh2010>) have been set aside for community-run workshops. One can reach a diverse and committed body of participants in the Digital Humanities at DH2010. Do you or your project have a workshop up your sleeve that would interest this Digital Humanities community?

Half- or one-day slots are available for workshops, which need to be self-organized and self-funding. KCL can provide space for the workshop at no or low cost, so it is likely that the costs per participant would be low.

We would like to receive proposals for such workshops.

In your full proposal (total 500-800 words), please include:

(1) a brief description of the workshop programme, the project or community out of which it arises, the trainers who will run the workshop, and its proposed length;

(2) what is the demand for this workshop, and who do you expect the audience to be? What minimum number of attendees would be needed for you to do the workshop?

(3) what funding is available or will you seek to help to support the costs of this workshop (for instance, travel for trainers, lunch or refreshments for participants, as applicable)?

A few groups have already expressed interest in running workshops, and we have been talking informally with them. If you have ideas that is not yet fully formed, we would be delighted to e-speak to you about them before you submit a proposal.

The closing date for full proposals will be 31 December 2009. Please send them via email to both John Bradley (john.bradley@kcl.ac.uk) and Gabriel Bodard (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

Forwarded on behalf of Peter Stokes. Note that the following is for students who are registered for PhDs in the United Kingdom.

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age: 17-22 May 2010

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the second year of this AHRC-funded course in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, the Warburg Institute, and King’s College London.

The course is open to arts and humanities doctoral students registered at UK institutions. It involves six days of intensive training on the alysis, description and editing of medieval manuscripts in the digital age to be held jointly in Cambridge and London. Participants will receive a solid theoretical foundation and hands-on experience in cataloguing and editing manuscripts for both print and digital formats.

The first half of the course involves morning classes and then visits to libraries in Cambridge and London in the afternoons. Participants will view original manuscripts and gain practical experience in applying the morning’s themes to concrete examples. In the second half we will address the cataloguing and description of manuscripts in a digital format with particular emphasis on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). These sessions will also combine theoretical principles and practical experience and include supervised work on computers.

The course is aimed principally at those writing dissertations which relate to medieval manuscripts, especially those on literature, art and history. There are no fees, but priority will be given to PhD students funded by the AHRC. Class sizes are limited to twenty and places are ‘first-come-first-served’ so early registration is strongly recommended.

For further details see http://ies.sas.ac.uk/study/mmsda/ or contact
Dr Peter Stokes at mmsda@sas.ac.uk.

Practical Epigraphy Workshop

Monday, November 9th, 2009

Forwarded for Charlotte Tupman.

Practical Epigraphy Workshop

22-24 June 2010, Great North Museum, Newcastle

A Practical Epigraphy Workshop is taking place for those who are interested in developing hands-on skills in working with epigraphic material. The workshop is aimed at graduate students, but other interested parties are welcome to apply, whether or not they have previous experience. With expert tuition, participants will learn the practical aspects of how to record and study inscriptions. The programme will include the making of squeezes; photographing and measuring inscribed stones; and the production of transcriptions, translations and commentaries. Participants may choose to work on Latin or Greek texts.

The course fee is £100 but we hope to be able to provide bursaries to participants to assist with the cost. Accommodation will be extra, but we are arranging B&B nearby for around £30-40.

Places on the workshop are limited and applications will be accepted until 31st March. For further details please contact Dr. Charlotte Tupman: charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk.

The Practical Epigraphy Workshop is sponsored by The British Epigraphy Society, an independent ‘chapter’ of the Association Internationale d’Épigraphie Grecque et Latine:

http://www.csad.ox.ac.uk/BES/

http://www2.bbaw.de/aiegl

Computer Applications in Archaeology Conference (CAA2010)

Monday, October 12th, 2009

Conference: CAA 2010
XXXVIII Annual Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology “Fusion of Cultures”

Conference Dates: April 6-9, 2010
Conference Location: Granada, Spain
URL: http://www.caa2010.org

Upcoming Deadlines:

– Session proposals submission deadline November 15, 2009
– Round tables proposals submission deadline December 15, 2009
– Workshops proposals submission deadline January 31, 2010

Other importat dates:
– Full papers submission will be open on November 20th,2009
– Full papers submission deadline December 15, 2009
– Short papers submission deadline January 31, 2010
– Poster submission deadline January 31, 2010
– Virtual theatre videos submission deadline January 31, 2010

The XXXVIII Annual CAA Conference will be held in Granada, Spain, from April 6 to 9, 2010 and is expected to bring together archaeologist, computer scientist and mathematicians to explore and exchange knowledge in order to enhance our understanding of the past. Classical disciplines like archaeology, anthropology or geography, and more modern ones like computer science, geomatics or museology exchange their most recent advances during the conference.
CAA 2010 is inspired in the concept “Fusion of Cultures” that identifies the scope of the conference and the spirit of the historical city of Granada. The aim of the conference is to create an collaborative atmosphere among all disciplines, by participating via papers, posters, round tables, workshops, short papers and a novel virtual theatre non-stop show. (more…)

Host your texts on Google in one day, Jan 11, 2010

Thursday, October 8th, 2009

Workshop: Host your texts on Google in one day

The Center For Hellenic Studies will conduct a one-day workshop at the Center’s Washington, D.C., campus, on Monday, Jan. 11, 2010, with the  subject: “Host your texts on Google in one day”. Bring one or more XML texts to the workshop in the morning, and leave in the afternoon with a running Google installation of Canonical Text Services serving your texts to the internet (http://chs75.chs.harvard.edu/projects/diginc/techpub/cts).

For more information, including how to apply, please see http://chs75.harvard.edu/CTSWorkshop.html.

Feel free to forward this announcement to anyone who might be interested.

DH2010: Digital Humanities 2010 CFP

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

Forwarded from DH2010 committee:

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the Digital Humanities 2010 Conference.

Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations Digital Humanities 2010
Call for Papers
Abstract Deadline: Oct. 31, 2009

Proposals must be submitted electronically using the system which will be available at the conference web site from October 8th. Presentations may be any of the following:

• Single papers (abstract max of 1500 words)
• Multiple paper sessions (overview max of 500 words)
• Posters (abstract max of 1500 words)

Call for Papers Announcement

The International Programme Committee invites submissions of abstracts of between 750 and 1500 words on any aspect of humanities computing, broadly defined to encompass the common ground between information technology and problems in humanities research and teaching. We welcome submissions in all areas of the humanities, particularly interdisciplinary work. We especially encourage submissions on the current state of the art in humanities computing, and on recent developments.

Suitable subjects for proposals include, for example,

* text analysis, corpora, language processing, language learning
* IT in librarianship and documentation
* computer-based research in cultural and historical studies
* computing applications for the arts, architecture and music
* research issues such as: information design and modelling; the cultural impact of the new media
* the role of digital humanities in academic curricula

The special theme of the 2010 conference is cultural heritage old and new.

(more…)

Digital Classicist seminars update

Wednesday, July 15th, 2009

Note that we have had to make a change to the programme for the Digital Classicist ICS seminar series.

The correct details are on the Digital Classicist website.

July 24 Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
‘Linking Archaeological Data ‘

July 31 Elton Barker (Oxford) & Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
‘Herodotos Encoded Space-Text-Imaging Archive’

(ie these two papers have been swapped around)

Remenber also that all presentations are podcast along with slides via an RSS feed.

Digital Classicist seminar update

Friday, May 29th, 2009

There has been a small change to the programme for the Digital Classicist/ICS Work-in-Progress seminar series.

The earlier post has been updated with the full details.
See: http://www.stoa.org/?p=909

Simon

EpiDoc Training Sessions 2009

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

EpiDoc Training Sessions 2009
London 20-24 July
Rome 21-25 September

The EpiDoc community has been developing protocols for the publication of inscriptions, papyri, and other documentary Classical texts in TEI-compliant XML: for details see the community website at http://epidoc.sf.net.

Over the last few years there has been increasing demand for training by scholars wishing to use EpiDoc. We are delighted to be able to announce two training workshops, which will be offered in 2009. Both will be led by Dr Gabriel Bodard. These sessions will benefit scholars working on Greek or Latin documents with an interest in developing skills in the markup, encoding, and exploitation of digital editions. Competence in Greek and/or Latin, and knowledge of the Leiden Conventions will be assumed; no particular computer skills are required.

London session, 20-24 July 2009. This will take place at the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King’s College London, 26-29 Drury Lane. The cost of attendance will be £50 for students; £100 for employees of universities or other non-profit institutions; £200 for employees of commercial institutions. Those interested in enrolling should apply to Dr Bodard, gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by 20 June 2009.

We hope to be able to offer some follow-up internships after the session, to enable participants to consolidate their experience under supervision; please let us know if that would be of interest to you.

Rome session, 21-25 September 2009. This will take place at the British School at Rome. Thanks to the generous support of the International Association of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, the British School and Terra Italia Onlus, attendance will be free.

Those interested in enrolling should apply to Dr Silvia Orlandi, silvia.orlandi@uniroma1.it by 30 June 2009.

Practical matters
Both courses will run from Monday to Friday starting at 10:00 am and ending at 16:00 each day.

Participants should bring a wireless-enabled laptop. You should acquire and install a copy of Oxygen *and* either an educational licence ($48) or a 30-day trial licence (free). Don’t worry if you don’t know how to use it!

Codicology and Palaeography in the Digital Age (Munich, July 3-4, 2009)

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

International Conference

Codicology and Palaeography in the Digital Age

Munich, 3-4 July 2009

The conference will focus on the challenges and consequences of using IT and the internet for codicological and palaeographic research. The authors of some selected articles of an anthology to be published this summer by the Institute for Documentology and Scholarly Editing (IDE) will present and discuss their excellent research results with scholars and experts working on ancient books and manuscripts. The presentations will be given on current issues in the following fields: manuscript catalogues and descriptions, digitization of manuscripts, collaborative systems of research on manuscripts, codicological databases, manuscript catalogues, research based on digital resources, e-learning in palaeography, palaeographic databases (characters, scripts, scribes), (semi-) automatic recognition of scripts and scribes, digital tools for transcriptions, visions and prototypes of other digital tools.

A panel discussion will be held with renowned exponents in the field of codicology and palaeography and contributors of cutting edge research to get an overview of the state of the art as well as to open up new perspectives of codicological and palaeographic research in the “digital age”.

(More information including preliminary programme)

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress seminar series

Friday, May 15th, 2009

We are very pleased to announce the programme for this summer’s Digital Classicist seminar series.

Digital Classicist/ICS Work in Progress Seminar, Summer 2009

Fridays at 16:30 in STB3/6 (Stewart House), Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

(NB: July 17th seminar in British Library, 96 Euston Rd, NW1 2DW)

June 5: Bart Van Beek (Leuven)
‘Onomastics and Name-extraction in Graeco-Egyptian Papyri’

June 12: Philip Murgatroyd (Birmingham)
‘Starting out on the Journey to Manzikert: Agent-based modelling and
Mediaeval warfare logistics’

June 19: Mark Hedges & Tobias Blanke (King’s College London)
‘Linking and Querying Ancient Texts: A multi-database case study with epigraphic corpora”

June 26: Marco Büchler & Annette Loos (Leipzig)
‘Textual Re-use of Ancient Greek Texts: A case study on Plato’s works’

July 3: Roger Boyle & Kia Ng (Leeds) *NB: in room:STB 9*
‘Extracting the Hidden: Paper Watermark Location and Identification’

July 10: Cristina Vertan (Hamburg)
‘Teuchos: An Online Knowledge-based Platform for Classical Philology’

July 17: Christine Pappelau (Berlin) *NB: in British Library*
‘Roman Spolia in 3D: High Resolution Leica 3D Laser-scanner meets
ancient building structures’

July 24: Elton Barker (Oxford)
‘Herodotos Encoded Space-Text-Imaging Archive’

July 31: Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
‘Linking Archaeological Data’

August 7: Alexandra Trachsel (Hamburg)
‘An Online Edition of the Fragments of Demetrios of Skepsis’

ALL WELCOME

We are inviting both students and established researchers involved in the application of the digital humanities to the study of the ancient world to come and introduce their work. The focus of this seminar series is the interdisciplinary and collaborative work that results at the interface of expertise in Classics or Archaeology and computer Science.

The seminars will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact any of the following:
Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk
Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk
Juan.Garces@bl.uk
Simon.Mahony@kcl.ac.uk
or see the seminar website at
http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2009.html

Ancient World and e-Science (report)

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009

On Saturday April 4, 2009, a panel on “Ancient World and e-Science”, organized by the Digital Classicist, was held at the Classical Association Annual Meeting at the University of Glasgow (full abstracts in GoogleDoc). The speakers and titles listed were:

  • Ryan Baumann & Gabriel Bodard, 3D Visualization and Digitization of Epigraphic Materials
  • Stuart Dunn, Seeing into the Past: Visualization, the ancient world, and the e-Science programme
  • Brian Fuchs, Rashmi Singhal, Jazz Mack Smith, & Gregory Crane, PhiloGrid: A Web Toolkit for the Ancient World
  • Caroline Macé, Ilse deVos, & Philippe Baret, Can phylogenetics methods help to cure contaminated textual traditions?

There was a slight change to the line-up on the day as Stuart Dunn’s attempts to reach Glasgow were scuppered by the incompetence of a budget airline: the three remaining papers were followed by 20 minutes open discussion, and then slightly early adjournment to the hotel bar.

Baumann spoke about the difficulties of reading, photographing, and visualizing curse tablets in general, and the steatite fragments from Amathous in Cyprus especially, which are translucent and therefore resistent to both normal photography and even the laser imaging used to take high-resolution 3-D images of inscribed objects. He then showed examples of a lead tablet (DT 25) which has degraded further in the century since it was transcribed, and argued that the high quality imaging this project is piloting is an important conservation exercise as well as having potential for improving the interpretation and transcription of the texts. The remainder of the presentation was a demonstration of some of the techniques for taking and manipulating 3-D readings using the laser scanner.

Fuchs gave a detailed history of and report on the PhiloGrid services, created by Imperial College London and the Perseus Project as part of a JISC/NEH Transatlantic collaborative digitization grant from 2008-09. He summarised the objectives and achievements of the project, including the mounting of Perseus web services such as lexical and morphological tools, the construction of a citation framework based on FRBR, and the digitization of new content. He also gave an introduction to and invited all present to attend a workshop on Arabic web services to be held at Imperial College London on Wednesday May 13 (further details to be announced here soon).

Macé and de Vos introduced the work carried out by classicists and generic biologists at the Université Catholique de Louvain on using statistical and probabilistic phylogenetic software to try and reconstruct the stemma of a contaminated manuscript tradition. They tested the phylogenetic algorithms for fitness for this task by creating a fictional manuscript tradition for a small section of the text of Proclus, including both horizontal and vertical contamination. Two phylogenetic methods—parsimony analysis and bootstrap analysis—were applied to the data, with mixed results. Vertical contamination in particular still defeats the generic technologies, but further work may improve the accuracy of such tools. (This work, needless to say, will also result in more robust algorithms and methodologies for the biologists, so this is a true e-Science interdisciplinary collaboration that really does have research interest for both fields.)

Many thanks to all who contributed to this panel, including the audience members who took part in the lively discussion afterward. Clearly there is a call for discussion of e-Science issues at Classics venues.

InterFace 2009: First Call for Papers

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Forwarded for Leif Isaksen from the Antiquist list:

—————————–

First Call for Papers

InterFace 2009:
1st National Symposium for Humanities and Technology

9-10 July, University of Southampton, UK.

http://www.interface09.org.uk

InterFace is a new type of annual event. Part conference, part workshop, part networking opportunity, it will bring together postdocs, early career academics and postgraduate researchers from the fields of Information Technology and the Humanities in order to foster cutting-edge collaboration. As well as having a focus on Digital Humanities, it will also be an important forum for Humanities contributions to Computer Science. The event will furthermore provide a permanent web presence for communication between delegates both during, and following, the conference.

Delegate numbers are limited to 80 (half representing each sector) and all participants will be expected to present a poster or a ‘lightning talk’ (a two minute presentation) as a stimulus for discussion and networking sessions. Delegates can also expect to receive illuminating keynote talks from world-leading experts, presentations on successful interdisciplinary projects, ‘Insider’s Guides’ and workshops. The registration fee for the two-day event is £30. For a full overview of the event, please visit the website.

Paper Submissions:

If you are interested in attending, please submit an original paper, of 1500 words or less, describing an idea or concept you wish to present. Please indicate whether you would prefer to produce a poster or perform a 2-minute lightning talk. Papers must be produced as a PDF or in Microsoft Word (.doc) format and submitted through our EasyChair page:

– Register for an easy chair account:
http://www.easychair.org/conferences/account_apply.cgi
– Log in: https://www.easychair.org/?conf=interface09
– Click New Submission at the top of the page and fill in the form.

Make sure you:
– Select your preference of lightning talk or poster.
– Select whether you are representing humanities or technology.
– Attach and upload your paper.

If you encounter any problems, please e-mail
submissions@interface09.org.uk

A number of travel bursaries may be available to successful applicants – if you would like to be considered for one, please email bursaries@interface09.org.uk and provide grounds for consideration.

Papers should focus on potential (and realistic) areas for collaboration between the Technology and Humanities Sectors, either by addressing particular problems, new developments, or both. Prior work may be presented where relevant but the nature of the paper must be forward-looking. As such, the scope is extremely broad but topics might include:

Technology

* 3D immersive environments
* Pervasive technologies
* Online collaboration
* Natural language processing
* Sensor networks
* The Semantic Web
* Agent based modelling
* Web Science

Humanities

* Spatial cognition
* Text editing and analysis
* New Media
* Linguistics
* Applied sociodynamics & social network analysis
* Archaeological reconstruction
* Information Ethics
* Dynamic logics
* Electronic corpora

Due to the limited number of places, papers will be subject to review by committee in order to maintain quality and a balanced programme. Applicants will be notified by email as to their acceptance. Accepted papers will be published online one week in advance of the conference.

Important Dates:

* Paper Submission Deadline: 1 May 2009
* Acceptances Announced: 18 May 2009
* Conference: 9th-10th July 2009

Confirmed Speakers

Keynote:
* Dame Wendy Hall, University of Southampton,
President of the Association of Computing Machinery

Insider’s Guides:
* Stephen Brown, De Montfort University
President of the Association for Learning Technology

* Ed Parsons
Geospatial Technologist, Google

* Sarah Porter
Head of Innovation, JISC

Project Showcase:

* Mary Orr & Mark Weal, University of Southampton
Digital Flaubert

* Adrian Bell
The Soldier in Later Medieval England

Workshops:

1) Text Encoding Initiative (TEI)
Arianna Ciula, European Science Foundation & Sebastian Rahtz, Oxford
University

2) Visualisation
Facilitator TBC

3) Data Management
Facilitator TBC

4) New Media
Facilitator TBC

For further information, please visit the conference website
(http://www.interface09.org.uk) or
e-mail info@interface09.org.uk

New Digital Humanities/Libraries/Museums Calendar

Friday, February 27th, 2009

Amanda French has started a publicly accessible calendar of conferences and events related to “Digital Humanities, Digital Libraries and Digital Museums.”

Special issue of the DHQ in honour of Ross Scaife

Friday, February 27th, 2009

copied from Humanist:

From: Julia Flanders
Subject: DHQ issue 3.1 now available
We’re very happy to announce the publication of the new issue of DHQ:

DHQ 3.1 (Winter 2009)
A special issue in honor of Ross Scaife: “Changing the Center of
Gravity: Transforming Classical Studies Through Cyberinfrastructure”
Guest editors: Melissa Terras and Gregory Crane
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements and Dedications
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Brent Seales, University of
Kentucky; Melissa Terras, University College London

Ross Scaife (1960-2008)
Dot Porter, Digital Humanities Observatory

Cyberinfrastructure for Classical Philology
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Brent Seales, University of
Kentucky; Melissa Terras, University College London

Technology, Collaboration, and Undergraduate Research
Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Thomas R. Martin, College
of the Holy Cross

Tachypaedia Byzantina: The Suda On Line as Collaborative Encyclopedia
Anne Mahoney, Tufts University

Exploring Historical RDF with Heml
Bruce Robertson, Mount Allison University

Digitizing Latin Incunabula: Challenges, Methods, and Possibilities
Jeffrey A. Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Citation in Classical Studies
Neel Smith, College of the Holy Cross

Digital Criticism: Editorial Standards for the Homer Multitext
Casey Dué, University of Houston, Texas; Mary Ebbott, College of the
Holy Cross

Epigraphy in 2017
Hugh Cayless, University of North Carolina; Charlotte Roueché, King’s
College London; Tom Elliott, New York University; Gabriel Bodard,
King’s College London

Digital Geography and Classics
Tom Elliott, New York University; Sean Gillies, New York University

What Your Teacher Told You is True: Latin Verbs Have Four Principal
Parts
Raphael Finkel, University of Kentucky; Gregory Stump, University of
Kentucky

Computational Linguistics and Classical Lexicography
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; David Bamman, Tufts University

Classics in the Million Book Library
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Alison Babeu, Tufts University;
David Bamman, Tufts University; Thomas Breuel, Technical University of
Kaiserslautern; Lisa Cerrato, Tufts University; Daniel Deckers,
Hamburg University; Anke Lüdeling, Humboldt-University, Berlin; David
Mimno, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Rashmi Singhal, Tufts
University; David A. Smith, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Amir
Zeldes, Humboldt-University, Berlin

Conclusion: Cyberinfrastructure, the Scaife Digital Library and
Classics in a Digital age
Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Gregory Crane, Tufts
University

Best wishes from the DHQ editorial team

Metadata Workshops in Michigan, 7 May 2009

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

Aimed at Medievalists but may also be of interest to Classicists…

The Medieval Academy of America’s Committee on Electronic Resources is pleased to announce two workshops to be held at the International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo, MI, in May 2009. Both workshops will be on Thursday, May 7 (sessions 54 and 166; see http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/sessions.html for complete conference schedule).

Workshop registration online at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d

1) Metadata for Medievalists I: Introduction to Metadata Formats
Session 54, Thursday 7 May, 10am

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, led by Sheila Bair, Western Michigan University’s Metadata Librarian. Instruction includes an introduction to the concept of metadata, an overview of metadata types of interest to medievalists working in a variety of textual and image formats, and an overview of methods for metadata implementations (database, encoded data, printed copy, etc.). Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

2) Metadata for Medievalists II: Introduction to the Text-Encoding Initiative
Session 166, Thursday 7 May, 3:30pm

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, taught by a medievalist, Dot Porter, specifically for medievalists. Instruction includes introductory-level XML and structural encoding, as well as TEI P5 standards and guidelines, markup concerns for medieval transcription, and a brief consideration of XML Editors. Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

Sheila Bair is the Metadata Librarian at Western Michigan University and holds an MS in Library Science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dot Porter is the Metadata Manager at the Digital Humanities Observatory, Royal Irish Academy, in Dublin, Ireland. She has an MA in Medieval Studies from Western Michigan University and an MS in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill, and extensive experience in text encoding in the medieval studies and classics.

Both workshops are limited to 35 participants, and registration is required.

The pre-registration fee per workshop for students is $40/$55 (Medieval Academy members/nonmembers), for non-students is $50/$65.

To register, complete the online form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d
Questions about registration should be directed to James W. Brodman at jimb[at]uca.edu
Questions about the workshops should be directed to Dot Porter at dot.porter[at]gmail.com

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Wednesday, February 4th, 2009

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of Work-in-Progress seminars in Summer 2009, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that involves equal collaboration with a computer scientist or that would be considered serious research in the Computing field as well as Classics, Archaeology, and/or Ancient History.

The Work-in-Progress seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London, and are sponsored by the Institute for Classical Studies (UofL), the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (KCL), the Centre for e-Research (KCL), and the British Library. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2009. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Best regards,

Gabriel Bodard (CCH)
Stuart Dunn (CeRch)
Juan Garcés (BL)
Simon Mahony (CCH)

Archaeological and Epigraphic interchange and e-Science

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

Workshop at the e-Science Institute, Edinburgh, February 10-11, 2009 (see programme and registration):

Rationale: The meeting will bring technical and editorial researchers participating in, or otherwise engaged with, the IOSPE (Inscriptiones Orae Septentrionalis Ponti Euxini = Ancient Inscriptions of the Northern Black Sea Coast.) project together with researchers in related fields, both historical and computational. Existing projects, such as the Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica and Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, have explored the digitization of ancient inscriptions from their regions, and employed the EpiDoc schema as markup. IOSPE plans to expand this sphere of activity, in conjunction with an multi-volume publication of inscription data. This event is a joint workshop funded in part by a Small Research Grant from the British Academy, and in part by the eSI through the Arts and Humanities e-Science theme. The workshop will bring together domain experts in epigraphy, and specialists in digital humanities, and e-science researchers, which will provide a detailed scoping of the research questions, and the research methods needed to investigate them from an historical/epigraphic point of view.

The success of previous projects, and the opportunities identified by the IOSPE research team, raise questions of significant interest for the e-science community. Great interpretive value can be attached to datasets such as these if they are linked, both with each other, and with other relevant datasets. The LaQuaT project at King’s, part of ENGAGE, is addressing this. There is also an important adjunct research area in the field of digital geographic analysis of these datasets: again, this can only be achieved if disparate data collections can be meaningfully cross-walked.

Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture

Saturday, November 29th, 2008

Posted on the Digital Classicist list by Melissa Terras.

Call for Papers: Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture

Editors Brent Nelson (University of Saskatchewan) and Melissa Terras
(University College London) invite submissions for a collection of
essays on “Digitizing Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture” to
be published in the New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance
Studies Series edited by Ray Siemens and William Bowen.

This collection of essays will build on the accomplishments of recent
scholarship on materiality by bringing together innovative research
on the theory and praxis of digitizing material cultures from roughly
500 A.D. to 1700 A.D. Scholars of the medieval and early modern
periods have begun to pay more attention to the material world not
only as a means of cultural experience, but also as a shaping
influence upon culture and society, looking at the world of material
objects as both an area of study and a rich source of evidence for
interpreting the past. Digital media enable new ways of evoking,
representing, recovering, and simulating these materials in
non-traditional, non-textual (or para-textual) ways and present new
possibilities for recuperating and accumulating material from across
vast distances and time, enabling both preservation and comparative
analysis that is otherwise impossible or impractical. Digital
mediation also poses practical and theoretical challenges, both
logistical (such as gaining access to materials) and intellectual
(for example, the relationship between text and object). This volume
of essays will promote the deployment of digital technologies to the
study of material culture by bringing together expertise garnered
from complete and current digital projects, while looking forward to
new possibilities for digital applications; it will both take stock
of the current state of theory and practice and advance new
developments in digitization of material culture. The editors welcome
submissions from all disciplines on any research that addresses the
use of digital means for representing and investigating material
culture as expressed in such diverse areas as:

• travelers’ accounts, navigational charts and cartography
• collections and inventories
• numismatics, antiquarianism and early archaeology
• theatre and staging (props, costumes, stages, theatres)
• the visual arts of drawing, painting, sculpture, print making, and
architecture
• model making
• paper making and book printing, production, and binding
• manuscripts, emblems, and illustrations
• palimpsests and three-dimensional writing
• instruments (magic, alchemical, and scientific)
• arts and crafts
• the anatomical and cultural body

We welcome approaches that are practical and/or theoretical, general
in application or particular and project-based. Submissions should
present fresh advances in methodologies and applications of digital
technologies, including but not limited to:

• XML and databases and computational interpretation
• three-dimensional computer modeling, Second Life and virtual worlds
• virtual research environments
• mapping technology
• image capture, processing, and interpretation
• 3-D laser scanning, synchrotron, or X-ray imaging and analysis
• artificial intelligence, process modeling, and knowledge representation

Papers might address such topics and issues as:

• the value of inter-disciplinarity (as between technical and
humanist experts)
• relationships between image and object; object and text; text and image
• the metadata of material culture
• curatorial and archival practice
• mediating the material object and its textual representations
• imaging and data gathering (databases and textbases)
• the relationship between the abstract and the material text
• haptic, visual, and auditory simulation
• tools and techniques for paleographic analysis

Enquiries and proposals should be sent to brent.nelson[at]usask.ca by
10 January 2009. Complete essays of 5,000-6,000 words in length will
be due on 1 May 2009.

CFP: Natural Language Processing for Ancient Language

Monday, November 24th, 2008

Chuck Jones has just posted a call for papers for a special issue of the TAL journal (Revue TAL) on the topic “Natual Language Processing for Ancient Language” over at AWBG.

Les historiens et l’informatique, Roma, December 4-6, 2008

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008

From an announement circulated by Marjorie Burghart:

Les historiens et l’informatique : un métier à réinventer

Jeudi 4 décembre – 14 h 30
Marilyn Nicoud (École française de Rome)
Accueil des participants

Jean-Philippe Genet (Université de Paris I)
Peut-on prévoir l’impact des transformations de l’informatique sur le travail scientifique de l’historien ?

L’historien et ses sources : archives et bibliothèques – 15 h 00
Anna Maria Tammaro (Università di Parma)
La biblioteca digitale verso la realizzazione dell’infrastruttura globale per gli studi umanistici

Roberto Delle Donne (Università di Napoli Federico II)
Storia e Open Archive

Christophe Dessaux (Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication)
De la numérisation des collections à Europeana : des contenus culturels pour la recherche

Gino Roncaglia (Università della Tuscia)
Libri elettronici : un panorama in evoluzione

Stefano Vitali (Archivio di Stato di Firenze)
I mutamenti nel mondo degli archivi

17 h 45-18 h 45 : Discussion

Vendredi 5 décembre – 9 h 00
Éditer
Michele Ansani (Università di Pavia) et Antonella Ghignoli (Università di Firenze)
Testi digitali : nuovi media e documenti medievali

Pierre Bauduin (Université de Caen) et Catherine Jacquemard (Université de Caen)
La pratique de l’édition en ligne : expériences et questionnements

Paul Bertrand (IRHT, CNRS)
Autour de l’édition électronique et des digital humanities : nouvelle érudition, nouvelle critique ?

10 h 30-11 h 00 : Discussion

Enseigner
Rolando Minuti (Università di Firenze)
Insegnare storia al tempo del web 2.0 : considerazioni su esperienze e problemi aperti

Giulio Romero (Atelhis)
Métier d’historiens, métiers d’historien : les impératifs d’une formation ouverte

12 h 45-13 h 15 : Discussion

Communiquer – 15 h 00
Pietro Corrao (Università di Palermo)
L’esperienza di Reti Medievali

Christine Ducourtieux (Université de Paris I) et Marc Smith (École nationale des Chartes),
L’expérience de Ménestrel

16 h 00 – 16 h. 30 Discussion

Les nouveaux horizons du métier d’historien
Aude Mairey (CESCM, CNRS-Université de Poitiers)
Quelles perspectives pour la textométrie ?

Julien Alerini (Université de Paris I) et Stéphane Lamassé (Université de Paris I)
Données et statistiques : l’avenir du travail en ligne pour l’historien

17 h 45-18 h 15 : Discussion

Samedi 6 décembre – 9 h 00
François Giligny (Université de Paris I)
L’informatique en archéologie : une révolution tranquille ?

Jean-Luc Arnaud (Telemme, CNRS-Université de Provence)
Nouvelles méthodes, nouveaux usages de la cartographie et de l’analyse spatiale en histoire

Margherita Azzari (Università di Firenze)
Geographic Information Systems and Science. Stato dell’arte, sfide future

10 h-30-11 h 00 : Discussion

L’historien et l’outil informatique
Serge Noiret (European University Institute)
Fare storia a più mani con il web 2.0 : cosa cambia nelle pratiche degli storici ?

Philippe Rygiel (Université de Paris I)
De quoi le web est-il l’archive ? Lectures historiennes de l’activité réseau

Jean-Michel Dalle (Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI)
Peut-on penser le futur d’une communauté scientifique sans tenir compte de l’économie de l’innovation et de la créativité ?

12 h 45-13 h 30 : Discussion

Conclusions d’Andrea Zorzi (Università di Firenze)

If you want to attend, please contact Marilyn Nicoud or Grazia Parrino, secrma@efrome.it

Digital Classicist Occasional Seminars: Lamé on digital epigraphy

Tuesday, November 4th, 2008

For those who are not subscribed to the Digital Classicist podcast RSS, I’d like to call attention to the latest “occasional seminar” audio and slides online: Marion Lamé spoke about “Epigraphical encoding: from the Stone to Digital Edition” in the internation video-conference series European Culture and Technology. Marion talked about her PhD project which is to use an XML-encoded edition of the Res Gestae Diui Augusti as an exercise in digital recording and presentation of an extremely important and rich historical text and encoding historical features in the markup.

We shall occasionally record and upload (with permission) presentations of interest to digital classicists that are presented in other venues and series. If you would be interested in contributing a presentation to this series, please contact me or someone else at the Digital Classicist.

Classical panels at DRHA

Sunday, September 21st, 2008

This year’s Digital Resources for the Humanities and Arts conference (Cambridge, September 14-17) included a two-part panel on Digital Classicist (sadly divided over two days), organized by Simon Mahony, Stuart Dunn, and myself. Despite some apparently last-minute (and unannounced) scheduling changes, the panel was very successful. I post here only my brief notes on the papers involved, and hope that some of my colleagues may post more detailed reactions or reports either in comments, or as posts to this or other blogs.

Gabriel Bodard

I kicked off the first Classicists’ session on Monday morning with a brief history of the Digital Classicist community and a discussion of the different approaches to studying the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world (contrasting the historical approach of Solomon 1993 with the forward-looking theme of Crane/Terras 2008, for which authors were asked to imagine their field within Classics in 2018). I talked in general terms about the different trajectories of two very early digital classical projects, the TLG and LGPN, both of which were founded in 1972. The TLG, while a technological innovative project from the get-go, and one which changed (and continues to be indispensible to) the study of Greek literature, has not made a great contribution to the Digital Humanities because of its closed, for-profit, and self-sufficient strategy. The LGPN on the other hand began life as a very technologically conservative projects, geared to the production of paper volumes of the Lexicon, and has always been reactive to changes in technology rather than proactive as the TLG was; as a result of this, however, they have been able to change with the times, adopt new database and web technologies as they appeared, and are now actively contributing to the development of standards in XML, onomastics, and geo-tagging, and sharing data and tools widely. Finally I argued that any study of the community of digital Classics needs both to consider history (lessons to be learned from projects such as those discussed above, and other venerable projects that are still currently innovative such as Perseus and the DDbDP), and consider the newest technologies, standards, and cyberinfrastructures that will drive our work forward in the future.

(David Robey pointed out that Classics has an important and unique position with the UK arts and humanities community in that the subject associations give validity and respectability by their support of and recognition for digital resources and research.)

Stuart Dunn

In a paper titled The UK’s evolving e-infrastructure and the study of the past, Stuart discussed the national e-Science agenda and how it relates to the practices and needs of the humanities scholar, using as a basis the research process of data collection, analysis, and publication/dissemination. The essential definition of e-Science is that it centres around scholarly collaboration across and between disciplines, and the advanced computational infrastructure that enables this collaboration. e-Science often involves working with huge bodies of data or processing-intensive operations on complex material, and the example of this kind of research Stuart offered was not Classical but Byzantine: the use of agent-based modelling by colleagues in Birmingham to simulate the climactic battle of Manzikert. After some general conclusions on the opportunities for advanced e-infrastructure to be used in the study of the ancient world, there was some lively discussion of geospacial resources in the British and European academic spheres.

Simon Mahony

Simon gave a detailed presentation of the Humslides 2.0 project that he is conducting with the Classics department at King’s College London. Building upon the work carried out in a pilot project in 2006-7 to digitise the teaching slide collections of the Classics department (as a pilot study for the School of Humanities), which adopted a free trial version of the ContentDM management system (trial license now expired, and not renewed), the new project will utilize Web 2.0 tools to present and organize some 7000 slides with more metadata and more input from students and other contributors. A Humslides Flickr group has been established, inspired in part by the Commons group set up by Library of Congress and now contributed to by several other major institutions. As well as providing a teaching resource (currently restricted to KCL students until some thorny copyright issues have been wrinkled out), students will be set assessed coursework tasks to contribute to the tagging and annotating of images in this collection.

Elpiniki Fragkouli

Due to illness, Elpiniki’s paper on Training, Communities of Practice, and Digital Humanities was not delivered at this conference. We shall see whether she would be willing to upload her slides on the Digital Classicist website for discussion.

Amy Smith (Leif Isaksen, Brian Fuchs)

The paper on Lightweight Reuse of Digital Resources with VLMA: perspectives and challenges, originally commissioned for the Digital Classicist panel, was at the last minute and for unknown reasons switched over into a panel on Digital Humanites on Tuesday morning. Amy presented this paper, which discussed lessons learned from the Virtual Lightbox for Museums and Archives project (discussed in detail in their article in the special issue of Digital Medievalist journal we edited). Some conclusions and discussion followed on the topic of RDF and other metadata standards, and on browser-based versus desktop applications for viewing and organizing remote objects.

John Pybus (Alan Bowman, Charles Crowther and Ruth Kirkham)

John’s presentation on A Virtual Research Environment for the Study of Documents and Manuscripts gave a succinct and very useful summary of the history of the VRE research that has been carried out by the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents and the humanities VRE team in Oxford. The project is one of four demo projects conducted by the second phase of work that begin with a user requirements survey in 2006-7. Built using uPortal, the VRE allows remote, parallel, and dynamic consultation and annotation of texts, images, and other resources by multiple scholars simultaneously. John showed some examples of the functionality of the VRE platform, including: the ability to show side-by-side parallel views of a tablet (different images or different renderings of the same image); the juxtaposition of multiple fragments in a lightbox; the ability to share views and exchange instant messages between scholars.

Emma O’Riordan (Michael Fulford, et al.)

In a paper that discussed another project related to the Oxford VRE programme, the Virtual Environment for Research in Archaeology: a Roman case study at Silchester, Emma discussed the origins of the VERA system in the Integrated Archaeological Database (IADB) that has been in use at Silchester for several years. The VERA system allows almost instant publication of the years results (as compared to waiting several months for paper notes to be transcribed); is cheaper than manual transcription; and more reliable than manual transcription; perhaps most importantly, the system enables live communication and collaboration between the archaeologists in the field and scholars in other parts of the world. Emma stressed one lesson from this project which was the importance of working alongside computer scientists, so that development of functionality can take into consideration the needs of the archaeologists as well as the research and interests of the programmers. It was interesting, however, that she also noted the potential pitfalls of too much tinkering with a tool while at work in the field.

Claire Warwick (Melissa Terras, et al.)

Originally scheduled in the second “Digital Humanities” on Tuesday morning, this paper followed logically on from Emma’s, and discussed Virtual Environments for Research in Archaeology (VERA): Use and Usability of Integrated Virtual Environments in Archaeological Research. Claire focussed on the evaluation of documentation of the unique needs of archaeologists in the field, and some conclusions the VERA team have been able to draw by the use of questionnaires, diaries, and anonymized interviews with the Silchester workers. Learning new IT skills was considered to be a burdern by students who were already having to learn fieldwork skills on the job; there were also new problems with the technology, as compared to the “pencil and paper” methods for which workflow and solutions had been developed over time. We look forward to a full report on the feedback and usability study that the UCL participants in the VERA project are conducting.

Leif Isaksen

Original scheduled for the “Digital Tools” panel, in this paper, Building a Virtual Community: The Antiquist Experience, Leif spoke to a Digital Classicist audience about a parallel community, Antiquist (who focus on digital approaches to cultural heritage and archaeology). The Antiquist community has an active mailing list (a Google group), a moribund blog, and a wiki whose main function is announcements of events. Antiquist boasts multiple moderators, many of whom try to keep the list active, and from the start they actively invited heritage professionals who were known to them to join the community. There is no set agenda, and membership is from a wide range of industries. Over time, traffic on the list has remained steady, with an unusually high percentage of active participants, but the content of the list traffic has tended recently to become more announcement-focussed rather than long threads and discussions. They are currently considering inviting new moderators to join the team, in the hope of injecting fresh blood and enthusiasm into a team who now rarely innovate and introduce new discussions to the group. Compared to many mailing lists, the community is still very active and very healthy, however. (Leif has usefully uploaded his slideshow and commented in a thread on the Antiquist email group.)