Archive for the ‘report’ Category

Report on Digital Classics panel, Classical Association 2013

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

(Report by Bartolo Natoli on the digital classics panel, April 6, 2013.)

Last week, I had the privilege of participating in the Classical Association Annual Conference at the University of Reading, UK. One of the panels that I attended struck me as particularly intriguing and important in today’s world of Higher Education: the Digital Classics panel. In fact, at the same time at which the CA Conference was occurring, the first annual Digital Classics Association Conference was happening at the University of Buffalo, a fact that further underlines the growing importance of this emerging side of Classics. (more…)

Report on e-learning panel, Classical Association 2013

Saturday, April 6th, 2013

(Report by Bartolo Natoli on the e-learning panel, April 5, 2013.)

Earlier today, the Classical Association’s Annual Conference, hosted by the University of Reading, presented two panels on ‘New Approaches to e-Learning’, a topic of growing interest in Classical Studies. The two panels boasted papers full of insights and suggestions for incorporating educational technology into both Latin and Classical Civilization classes. The first panel, consisting of papers by Jonathan Eaton and Alex Smith, focused more on how technology could be employed in classroom instruction on a macro-level. Eaton’s talk provided examples of how Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) could be used to enhance student learning and touched on the controversial topic of massive open online courses (MOOCs). Eaton suggested that VLEs be used to offer resources to students asynchronically, whereas evaluation and direct instruction be employed in a f2f setting: blended learning was a key means of maximizing learning potential. An example of such blended learning was Alex Smith’s discussion of using technology to provide students with collaborative and higher-level learning activities based on synthesis through the creation of a website in eXeLearning that was based on set lines of Latin. Students worked through both Latin content and 21st century, real-world skills such as collaboration and web design. Technology provided the medium, but was not the goal. (more…)