Archive for the ‘seminar’ Category

Editing Texts and Digital Libraries: 2 seminars in Leipzig

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Posted for Greta Franzini:

Next week the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities is hosting two seminars as part of its Digital Philology course:

1) Monday May 19th, 3:15-4:45pm, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“Editing Texts in Context: Two Case Studies” by Rebecca Finnigan, Christine Bannan and Prof. Neel D. Smith, College of the Holy Cross

2) Tuesday May 20th, 9:15-10:45am, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“digilibLT – a Digital Library of Late Latin Texts” by Prof. Maurizio Lana, Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)

For more information, please visit http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/news-announcements/

Digital Classicist London seminars, 2014

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014

Fridays at 16:30 in room G37* Senate House
Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU
* Unless otherwise specified below

June 6* Ségolène Tarte (Oxford), On Cognition and the Digital in the Study of Ancient Textual Artefacts 103 (Holden Room)
June 13* Victoria Moul & Charlotte Tupman (King’s College London), Neo-Latin poetry in English manuscripts, 1550-1700 103 (Holden Room)
June 20 Lorna Richardson (University College London), Public Archaeology in a Digital Age
June 27 Monica Berti, Greta Franzini & Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig), The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects
July 4* Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg), The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data 102 (Athlone Room)
July 11 Silke Vanbeselaere (Leuven), Retracing Theban Witness Networks in Demotic Contracts
July 18* Thibault Clérice (King’s College London), Clotho: Network Analysis and Distant Reading on Perseus Latin Corpus G34
July 25* Marja Vierros (Helsinki), Papyrology and Linguistic Annotation: How can we make TEI EpiDoc XML corpus and Treebanking work together? G35
Aug 1 Sebastian Rahtz (Oxford) & Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relations in Greco-Roman Names (SNAP:DRGN)
Aug 8 Dominic Oldman & Barry Norton (British Museum), A new approach to Digital Editions of Ancient Manuscripts using CIDOC-CRM, FRBRoo and RDFa
Aug 15 Various postgraduate speakers, Short presentations

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk, Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk, S.Mahony@ucl.ac.uk or Charlotte.Tupman@kcl.ac.uk, or see the seminar website at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2014.html

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, March 10th, 2014

We have had requests for a few days’ extension to the deadline for abstracts and consider it only fair to extend that to everyone. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014

See earlier CFP for full details.

Course on Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Via an email from Katie Green to the Antiquist list:

Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing
Mon 3 to Tue 4 Mar 2014
Rewley House 1 Wellington Square Oxford OX1 2JA

Through a series of presentations, practical sessions and group discussions, this course will explore the importance of digital preservation for the long term safety of archaeological data and provide practical guidance on how to prepare, curate, deposit and access digital data. The course will also provide guidance on data publishing online and introduce Linked Open Data for archaeology. The course is aimed primarily at archaeology data creators and data curators operating in national agency and local authority heritage environments. However this course will also be of benefit to professionals working in commercial, independent and research environments and to community groups utilising and creating archaeological data. The course will be of particular interest to those who maintain large data sets and need to efficiently manage, effectively preserve and provide access to their data for the future.

More details available here: http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/details.php?id=V400-325&Category=800
If you have any questions about this course, please email professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk.

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, January 6th, 2014

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014. (Note new deadline.)

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: www.digitalclassicist.org/wip

DCSB 2013/2014: programme now online

Monday, October 7th, 2013

We are glad to announce to the community that this year’s #DigiClass Berlin seminar programme has now been published:

All seminars will be video recorded and the videos, as well as the slides, will be available from the programme page.

Digital Classicist London Videocasts

Friday, August 16th, 2013

The videocasts for all the 2013 Digital Classicist London summer seminars are now available online at the Seminar Programme page. Each presentation is available as a downloadable or streamable video (MP4), or, for those who prefer audio, as MP3. Slideshows have also been made available in PDF format, although these are generally included in the video as well. Users can receive updates to the series, including videos from the London, Berlin, and occasional other seminars, by subscribing to the Seminar RSS Feed, or following @Stoaorg on Twitter.

Many thanks to our excellent videographer Wilma Stefani for filming and editing the videos, and to all our speakers for permission to share their presentations and slides.

(Thanks also to Christina Kamposiori, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale who helped with the organization and management of the seminars every week.)

Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

Seminar: Hestia 2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Via Leif Isaksen on the Digital Classicist list:

Dear all,

The AHRC-funded Hestia project is pleased to announce “Hestia2:
Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources”, a one-day seminar
on spatial network analysis and linked data in Classical studies,
archaeology and cultural heritage.

The seminar will be held at The University of Southampton on 18 July.
Registration for this event is free, but we do recommend registering
as early as possible since the number of available places is limited.
More information, including abstracts and registration, can be found
via the following link: http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/hestia-2013/

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Southampton!

Elton Barker, Stefan Bouzarovski, Leif Isaksen and Tom Brughmans (more…)

Lecture: Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Via Simon Mahony:

The first of this Summer’s Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies seminars is this Friday.

Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton)
‘Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models’

Friday June 7 at 16:30
Room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Are lines of sight between Roman towns important for explaining their location? Through a case study on visibility patterns between urban settlements in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain, this paper will discuss how Exponential Random Graph Models (ERGM) can help explore hypothetical past processes of interaction and site location. With these models the frequency of certain subnetworks in random networks and the empirically attested network is compared, to examine the probability that the subnetworks might have emerged through random processes. This paper will critically evaluate the potential and limitations of such an approach for archaeology.

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

All are welcome

The full 2013 programme is at <http://digiclass.cch.kcl.ac.uk/wip/wip2013.html>

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

The programme for the Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013 is now published (the abstracts will be added very soon). Please circulate this via your networks. We have, for several years, been recording these seminars and making the audio files available on our seminar webpage. This year we will be recording video and so presentation slides, audio and video files will be available after each seminar.

The programme flyer can be downloaded as a PDF.

All seminars are on Fridays at 16:30 at Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU.

  • June 7: Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton) Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models
  • June 14: Valeria Vitale (King’s College London) An Ontology for 3D Visualization in Cultural Heritage
  • June 21: Tom Cheesman (University of Swansea) Putting Translations To Work: TransVis
  • June 28: Adrian Ryan (University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa) Quantifying stylistic distance between Athenian vase-paintings
  • July 5: Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania) The Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance: a federated platform for discovery and research
  • July 12: 16:30: Eleni Bozia (University of Florida) The Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project
    17:30: Greta Franzini (University College London) A catalogue of digital editions: Towards an edition of Augustine’s City of God
  • July 19: Federico Boschetti ( ILC-CNR, Pisa) & Bruce Robertson (Mount Allison, Canada) An Integrated System For Generating And Correcting Polytonic Greek OCR
  • July 26: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University) Teaching with the Perseids Platform: Tools and methods
  • August 2: Neel Smith (College of the Holy Cross) Scholarly reasoning and writing in an automatically assembled and tested digital library
  • August 9: Agnes Thomas, Francesco Mambrini & Matteo Romanello (DAI, Berlin) Insights in the World of Thucydides: The Hellespont Project as a research environment for Digital History

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 22-25, 2013

Friday, January 11th, 2013

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital text-markup for epigraphic and papyrological editing, to be held in the Institute for Classical Studies, London and supported by the British Epigraphy Society and Society for Promotion of Roman Studies. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), James Cowey (Heidelberg), Simona Stoyanova (KCL) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and Curse Tablets from Roman Britain, Pandektis (inscriptions of Macedonia and Thrace), and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML and markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object description in EpiDoc as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required to apply, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday March 1st, 2013.

London Digital Classicist Seminars

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar, Summer 2012

Fridays at 16:30 in Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

June 1 Chiara Salvagni (KCL), Digital Critical Editions of Homer G37
June 8 Jari Pakkanen (RHUL), Pattern detection in archaeological data: quantum modelling, Bronze Age Aegean lead weights and Greek Classical Doric architecture G37
June 15 Angeliki Chrysanthi (Southampton), A visitor-sourced methodology for the interpretation of archaeological sites Court Room
June 22 Alejandro Giacometti, Lindsay MacDonald (UCL) & Alberto Campagnolo (University of the Arts), Cultural Heritage Destruction: Documenting Parchment Degradation via Multispectral Imaging G37
June 29 Marco Buchler & Gregory Crane (Leipzig), Historical Text Re-use Detection on Perseus Digital Library G37
July 6 Charlotte Tupman (KCL), Digital epigraphy beyond the Classical: creating (inter?)national standards for recording modern and early modern gravestones G22/26
July 13 Maggie Robb (KCL), Digitising the Prosopography of the Roman Republic G37
July 20 Paolo Monella (Centro Linceo, Rome), In the Tower of Babel: modelling primary sources of multi-testimonial textual transmissions G37

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk, Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk or S.Mahony@ucl.ac.uk, or see the seminar website at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2012.html

Digital Classicist London 2012: Call for Papers

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

This is a reminder of the approaching deadline (April 1st) for abstracts for this summer’s Digital Classicist seminar series.
Full details are on the earlier post and the Digital Classicist website.

Linked Ancient World Data Institute at NYU (Spring 2012)

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) will host the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) from May 31st to June 2nd, 2012 in New York City. “Linked Open Data” is an approach to the creation of digital resources that emphasizes connections between diverse information on the basis of published and stable web addresses (URIs) that identify common concepts and individual items. LAWDI, funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for Humanities, will bring together an international faculty of practitioners working in the field of Linked Data with twenty attendees who are implementing or planning the creation of digital resources.

More information, including a list of faculty, and application instructions are available at the LAWDI page on the Digital Classicist wiki.

Working with Text in a Digital Age, RFP

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Tufts University invites applications to “Working with Text in a Digital Age”, a three-week NEH Institute for Advanced Technology in the Digital Humanities (July 23-August 10, 2012) that combines traditional topics such as TEI Markup with training in methods from Information Retrieval, Visualization, and Corpus and Computational Linguistics. Faculty, graduate students, and library professionals are encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit proposals by February 15, 2012. Participant proposals must include CVs and statements of purpose (no more than 1,000 words) describing how they will be able to use participation in the Institute to advance their subsequent careers. Participants must be committed to collaborative work and to publication of results from this Institute under a Creative Commons license. Participants should identify source materials with which they propose to work during the Institute and which must be in the public domain or available under a suitable license. In an ideal case, source materials would include both texts for intensive analysis and annotation and one or more larger corpora to be mined and analyzed more broadly. Statements of purpose must describe initial goals for the Institute. For more information or to submit applications, please contact lcerrato@perseus.tufts.edu.

We particularly encourage participants who are committed to developing research agendas that integrate contributions and research by undergraduates, that expand the global presence of the Humanities, and that, in general, broaden access to and participation in the Humanities. Preference will be given to participants who are best prepared not only to apply new technologies but to do so as a means to transform their teaching and research and the relationship of their work to society beyond academia.

Digital Classicist Seminar 2011, CFP

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Call for Papers

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars in Summer 2011, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. Themes could include, but are by no means limited to, visualization, information and data linking, digital textual and linguistic studies, and geographic information and network analysis; so long as the content is likely to be of interest both to classicists / ancient historians / archaeologists and information scientists / digital humanists, and would be considered serious research in at least one of those fields.

The seminars run on Friday afternoons (16:30 – 19:00) from June to mid-August in Senate House, London, and are hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (University of London). In previous years collected papers from the Digital Classicist seminars have been published in an online special issue of Digital Medievalist, a printed volume from Ashgate Press, a BICS supplement (in production), and the last three years have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

We have a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by April 15th, 2011. We shall announce the full programme at the end of April.

(Coörganised by Will Wootton, Charlotte Tupman, Matteo Romanello, Simon Mahony, Timothy Hill, Alejandro Giacometti, Juan Garcés, Stuart Dunn & Gabriel Bodard.)

What is Web 2.0?

Monday, October 25th, 2010

This blog post is the introduction to a lecture on Publishing and Web 2.0 I am delivering to students on the Digital Humanities MA, and is partly intended as a venue for online discussion in the comments section. All are welcome to join in the discussion.

When I posted the question, “What is Web 2.0?” on Twitter at the weekend, the first reply was from @espenore, who wrote:

A buzzword 10 years ago :-)

Leading me to muse:

Does this mean that 2004′s “Web 2.0″ is 2010′s “The Web”?

More seriously, most online definitions of Web 2.0 focus on the dynamic nature of Web content:

“The second generation of the World Wide Web, especially the movement away from static webpages to dynamic and shareable content and social networking”
(Wiktionary)

and

“Web 2.0 does not refer to any specific change in the technology of the Internet, but rather the behavior of how people use the Internet”
(Twinity)

and

“Le web 2.0 se caractérise principalement par la prise de pouvoir des internautes”
(Novaterra)

The idea that the Web is not controlled by a top-down, monolithic publishing industry, but an organic, uncontrolled, intelligent network authored and edited by all users is a powerful one. (On of the nicest descriptions of this is The Machine is Us/ing Us .) There is a lot of monolithic content on the Web, of course, and this is sometimes among the more professional and reliable material out there, but almost every web search returns pages from Wikipedia and blogs high in the results list.

It has become the norm to see the Web as a place to post content, to add comments, to correct errors and omissions (or introduce errors and misinformation). Obviously, this is no longer about new technology or tools; all this dynamic functionality has been around for a long time (in Internet terms) and is both the norm and visible on the vast majority of the Web, so the rhetoric of “version 2.0″ is broken. Rather it is a subset of the kind of activity that takes place on the Web: leaving comments rather than just reading news; editing rather than just reading Wikipedia; reviewing rather than just buying books; even searching the Web with cookies enabled.

In this lecture we’re going to discuss the implications of this dynamic and semantic Web on publishing, and especially academic output. We’ll look at a few examples of blogs (The Stoa Consortium, AH Net, DH Now), wikis (Digiclass, Academic Publishing, Uncyclopedia), and talk about the kinds of scholarly activities that are appropriate to publishing in these media.

Watch the comments to see how convincing this all turned out to be.

(My slides for this class are available as an Open Access Google presentation.)

Digital Classicist 2010 seminars

Monday, May 24th, 2010

Digital Classicist 2010 summer seminar programme
Institute of Classical Studies

Meetings are on Fridays at 16:30
in room STB9 (Stewart House)
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

*ALL WELCOME*
Seminars will be followed by refreshments

  • Jun 4 Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
    Reading Between the Lines: unearthing structure in Ptolemy’s Geography
  • Jun 11 Hafed Walda (King’s College London) and Charles Lequesne (RPS Group)
    Towards a National Inventory for Libyan Archaeology
  • Jun 18 Timothy Hill (King’s College London)  
    After Prosopography? Data modelling, models of history, and new directions for a scholarly genre.
  • Jun 25 Matteo Romanello (King’s College London)       
    Towards a Tool for the Automatic Extraction of Canonical References
  • Jul 2 Mona Hess (University College London)  
    3D Colour Imaging For Cultural Heritage Artefacts
  • Jul 16 Annemarie La Pensée (National Conservation Centre) and Françoise Rutland (World Museum Liverpool)
    Non-contact 3D laser scanning as a tool to aid identification and interpretation of archaeological artefacts: the case of a Middle Bronze Age Hittite Dice
  • Jul 23 Mike Priddy (King’s College London)
    On-demand Virtual Research Environments: a case study from the Humanities
  • Jul 30 Monica Berti (Torino) and Marco Büchler (Leipzig)
    Fragmentary Texts and Digital Collections of Fragmentary Authors
  • Aug 6 Kathryn Piquette (University College London)
    Material Mediates Meaning: Exploring the artefactuality of writing utilising qualitative data analysis software
  • Aug 13 Linda Spinazzè (Venice)
    Musisque Deoque. Developing new features: manuscripts tracing on the net

For more information on individual seminars and updates on the programme, see http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010.html

Digital Classicist 2010 Seminars CFP

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, with support from the British Library, in Summer 2010 on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that demonstrates interdisciplinarity or work on the intersections between Ancient History, Classics or Archaeology and a digital, technical or practice-based discipline.

The Digital Classicist seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published(*) in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008-9); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series. A small budget is available to help with travel costs.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2010. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Regards,

The organizers

Gabriel Bodard, King’s College London
Stuart Dunn, King’s College London
Juan Garcés, Greek Manuscripts Department, British Library
Simon Mahony, University College London
Melissa Terras, University College London

(more…)

Relationships Between Classics and Museums (Cambridge)

Friday, January 29th, 2010

(While this is not strictly a digital Classics series, the interdisciplinary questions and issues of cultural heritage and curation being discussed ought to be of interest to Stoa readers. If anyone is attending these seminars we would be delighted to post short reports or reactions here.)

Two worlds colliding?: the relationships between Classics and Museums
organised by Dr Kate Cooper, Fitzwilliam Museum

Tuesdays at 4.30pm Room 1.04 Faculty of Classics (Sidgwick Site), Cambridge. All Welcome.

26th January Professor Robin Cormack (Courtauld Institute of Art & Faculty of Classics, Cambridge)
Perspectives from the outside: curating temporary loan exhibitions at the Royal Academy and elsewhere.

2nd February Dr Susan Walker (Keeper of Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum)
Change and flow: the new Ashmolean

9th February Dr Lucilla Burn (Keeper of Antiquities, Fitzwilliam Museum)
How do the Greek and Roman collections of the Fitzwilliam Museum and their display relate to the study of Classics?

16th February Dr Andrew Burnett (Deputy Director, The British Museum)
International issues and museums today

23rd February Dr Roger Bland (Head of the Department of Portable Antiquities and Treasure, The British Museum)
A license to loot or archaeological rescue? The Portable Antiquities Scheme in England and Wales

2nd March Dr Timothy Potts (Director, The Fitzwilliam Museum)
Museums and the preservation of archaeological heritage: past practice and future prospects

Spacial Analysis in Archaeology (seminars)

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Contemporary Roles for Spatial Analysis in Archaeology

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Seminar Series (January–March 2010)
31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
Mondays 4pm, Room 612 (followed by a wine reception)

Timetable

11 January 2010 – Benjamin Ducke (Oxford Archaeology)
‘Science without software no longer. Archaeological data analysis and the Open Source paradigm’

18 January 2010 – Chris Green (University of Leicester)
‘Temporal GIS and archaeology’

25 January 2010 – Tony Wilkinson (Durham University)
‘From household to region: incorporating agency into the interpretation of regional settlement’

1 February 2010 – Tim Williams (University College London)
‘Earth viewers and GIS in archaeological resource management: access and accessibility’

8 February 2010 – Luke Premo (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary
Anthropology)
‘A spatially explicit model of Early Stone Age archaeological landscapes’

15 February 2010 (Reading Week – no seminar)

22 February 2010 – Frederic Fol Leymarie (Goldsmiths College)
‘Advances in 3D procedural modelling with applications to archaeology’

1 March 2010 – Michael Barton (Arizona State University)
‘Stories of the past or science of the future? Archaeology and computational social science’

8 March 2010 – Irmela Herzog (Archaeological Heritage Management of the Rhineland)
‘Patterns of movement, least cost paths and our understanding of the archaeological record’

15 March 2010 – Kate Devlin (Goldsmiths College)
‘Illuminating virtual reconstructions of past environments’

22 March 2010 – Mark Lake (University College London)
‘Rewind and fast‐forward: how archaeological GIS analyses recapitulate general theory’

Digital Classicist seminar update

Friday, May 29th, 2009

There has been a small change to the programme for the Digital Classicist/ICS Work-in-Progress seminar series.

The earlier post has been updated with the full details.
See: http://www.stoa.org/?p=909

Simon

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress seminar series

Friday, May 15th, 2009

We are very pleased to announce the programme for this summer’s Digital Classicist seminar series.

Digital Classicist/ICS Work in Progress Seminar, Summer 2009

Fridays at 16:30 in STB3/6 (Stewart House), Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

(NB: July 17th seminar in British Library, 96 Euston Rd, NW1 2DW)

June 5: Bart Van Beek (Leuven)
‘Onomastics and Name-extraction in Graeco-Egyptian Papyri’

June 12: Philip Murgatroyd (Birmingham)
‘Starting out on the Journey to Manzikert: Agent-based modelling and
Mediaeval warfare logistics’

June 19: Mark Hedges & Tobias Blanke (King’s College London)
‘Linking and Querying Ancient Texts: A multi-database case study with epigraphic corpora”

June 26: Marco Büchler & Annette Loos (Leipzig)
‘Textual Re-use of Ancient Greek Texts: A case study on Plato’s works’

July 3: Roger Boyle & Kia Ng (Leeds) *NB: in room:STB 9*
‘Extracting the Hidden: Paper Watermark Location and Identification’

July 10: Cristina Vertan (Hamburg)
‘Teuchos: An Online Knowledge-based Platform for Classical Philology’

July 17: Christine Pappelau (Berlin) *NB: in British Library*
‘Roman Spolia in 3D: High Resolution Leica 3D Laser-scanner meets
ancient building structures’

July 24: Elton Barker (Oxford)
‘Herodotos Encoded Space-Text-Imaging Archive’

July 31: Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
‘Linking Archaeological Data’

August 7: Alexandra Trachsel (Hamburg)
‘An Online Edition of the Fragments of Demetrios of Skepsis’

ALL WELCOME

We are inviting both students and established researchers involved in the application of the digital humanities to the study of the ancient world to come and introduce their work. The focus of this seminar series is the interdisciplinary and collaborative work that results at the interface of expertise in Classics or Archaeology and computer Science.

The seminars will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact any of the following:
Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk
Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk
Juan.Garces@bl.uk
Simon.Mahony@kcl.ac.uk
or see the seminar website at
http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2009.html

Metadata Workshops in Michigan, 7 May 2009

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

Aimed at Medievalists but may also be of interest to Classicists…

The Medieval Academy of America’s Committee on Electronic Resources is pleased to announce two workshops to be held at the International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo, MI, in May 2009. Both workshops will be on Thursday, May 7 (sessions 54 and 166; see http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/sessions.html for complete conference schedule).

Workshop registration online at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d

1) Metadata for Medievalists I: Introduction to Metadata Formats
Session 54, Thursday 7 May, 10am

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, led by Sheila Bair, Western Michigan University’s Metadata Librarian. Instruction includes an introduction to the concept of metadata, an overview of metadata types of interest to medievalists working in a variety of textual and image formats, and an overview of methods for metadata implementations (database, encoded data, printed copy, etc.). Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

2) Metadata for Medievalists II: Introduction to the Text-Encoding Initiative
Session 166, Thursday 7 May, 3:30pm

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, taught by a medievalist, Dot Porter, specifically for medievalists. Instruction includes introductory-level XML and structural encoding, as well as TEI P5 standards and guidelines, markup concerns for medieval transcription, and a brief consideration of XML Editors. Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

Sheila Bair is the Metadata Librarian at Western Michigan University and holds an MS in Library Science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dot Porter is the Metadata Manager at the Digital Humanities Observatory, Royal Irish Academy, in Dublin, Ireland. She has an MA in Medieval Studies from Western Michigan University and an MS in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill, and extensive experience in text encoding in the medieval studies and classics.

Both workshops are limited to 35 participants, and registration is required.

The pre-registration fee per workshop for students is $40/$55 (Medieval Academy members/nonmembers), for non-students is $50/$65.

To register, complete the online form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d
Questions about registration should be directed to James W. Brodman at jimb[at]uca.edu
Questions about the workshops should be directed to Dot Porter at dot.porter[at]gmail.com