Archive for the ‘seminar’ Category

Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2016/17

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

We are delighted to announce that the final programme for this year’s Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin is now online. You can find it at <http://de.digitalclassicist.org/berlin/seminar2016> and below.

The seminar series will start on Oct. 18 with a keynote by Silvia Polla (TOPOI) entitled “Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey.”

Seminars take place on Tuesdays (starting at 17:00 c.t.) on a fortnightly basis at the TOPOI building Dahlem or at the DAI.

We would also like to draw your attention to the possibility for students to attend the seminar as part of their curriculum. The seminar is now part of the academic programme of the Freie Universität under the name “Digitale Methoden in den Altertumswissenschaften” (see the FU’s course catalog <http://www.fu-berlin.de/vv/de/lv/315967>).

The seminar is recognised with 5 credit points (ECTS): this requires the attendance of the seminars and a 15 minute poster presentation on one of the topics covered by the seminar series. The poster presentations can be either in English or German and will take place after the end of the seminars on 18.4.2017 in the TOPOI building Dahlem.

Programme

18.10.2016
Silvia Polla (TOPOI)
“Between Demography and Consumption: Digital and Quantitative approaches in the Mediterranean Surface Survey”

1.11.2016
Undine Lieberwirth & Axel Gering (TOPOI)
“3D GIS in archaeology – a micro-scale analysis”

15.11.2016
Duncan Keenan-Jones (Glasgow)
“Digital Experimental Archaeology: Hero of Alexandria and his Automata in CAD”

29.11.2016
Chiara Palladino & Tariq Youssef (Leipzig)
“iAligner: a tool for syntax-based intra-language text alignment”

13.12.2016
Christian Prager (Bonn)
“Of Codes, Glyphs and Kings: Tasks, Limits and Approaches in the Encoding of Classic Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions”

10.1.2017
Wolfgang Schmidle et al. (DAI)
“chronOntology: A time gazetteer with principles”

24.1.2017
Nathan Gibson (Vanderbilt)
“Toward a Cyberinfrastructure for Syriac Literature: Mapping a Text Corpus using TEI and RDF”

7.2.2017
Katherine Crawford (Southampton)
“In the Footsteps of the Gods: network approach to modeling Roman Religious Processions”

21.2.2017
Aline Deicke (Mainz)
“From E19 to MATCH and MERGE. Mapping the CIDOC CRM to graph databases as an environment for archaeological network research”

UCLDH Seminar

Monday, March 21st, 2016

Details of the upcoming seminar in the UCLDH 2016 series follow:

The ancient cultures of Sumer, Assyria and Babylonia have left a rich written legacy, in the form of many hundreds of thousands of clay tablets, inscribed in the complex, wedge-shaped cuneiform script. Over the past two centuries these artefacts, dating from c.3000 BC to c.100 AD, have been excavated from archaeological sites across the Middle East, particularly Iraq and Syria, and are now housed in many different museums around the world.

For several decades now there has been a concerted effort to catalogue, photograph, edit and analyse these most precious witnesses of the first half of history. The editorial and analytical effort has been spearheaded by Oracc.org, the Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus, co-directed by Professor Eleanor Robson here at UCL, along with international colleagues.

On Wednesday 27th April 2016, Eleanor Robson, along with Raquel Alegre of RITS, will give a seminar presenting a new editorial interface they have been working on for Oracc, that will hopefully enable a significant number of less technophile colleagues to contribute to the project. They will explain what Oracc does and why it matters, why new software was needed, and how it improves the editorial experience.

All welcome and there will be drinks and discussion after the talk.
Please note that registration is required: https://ucldhseminarritsoracc.eventbrite.co.uk

Unlocking the Digital Humanities (Tufts and Leipzig, Feb 29–May 2)

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016

Unlocking the Digital Humanities

http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x

An Open Research Series organized by the Tufts Department of Classics and by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig.

Talks will take place in Eaton Hall on the Medford Campus of Tufts University and in Paulinum 402 at the University of Leipzig. All talks will be broadcast as Google Hangouts and published on Youtube.

The URLs for the Google Hangouts and for the Youtube recordings will be posted at http://tiny.cc/k8ad9x.

Part 1. Introducing Digital Humanities

What is digital humanities? Why does it matter to you? All humanities disciplines welcome.

29 Feb, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Language, Digital Philology and the Humanities in a Global Society.

Gregory Crane, Winnick Family Chair and Professor of Classics, Tufts University; Alexander von Humboldt Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

2 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Digital Humanities: Everything you wanted to know but haven’t yet asked.

Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

7 Mar, 12–1:00pm, Eaton 202

Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods.

Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig.

Melinda Johnston, prev. Cartoon Specialist, National Library of New Zealand

Part 2. Digital Humanities Showcase

Ask the experts! Hear and discuss use-cases of recent DH research and teaching.

10 Mar, 4:00-5:00pm, Eaton 123
Valid and Verified Undergraduate Research.
Christopher Blackwell, Forgione University Professor, Furman University
Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Assistant Professor, Tufts University

14 Mar, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
eLearning and Computational Language Research.
Thomas Koentges, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, Leipzig

4 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Rediscovery of Postclassical Latin and European Culture.
Neven Jovanovic, Associate Professor of Latin, University of Zagreb
Petra Sostaric, Lecturer, University of Zagreb

11 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Visualizing Literary and Historical Social Networks.
Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor of English, Northeastern University

11 Apr, 5:00-6:00pm, Eaton 123
From Archive to Corpus: Bottom-Up Bibliography for Millions of Books.
David A Smith, Assistant Professor College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University

25 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Spatial and Chronological Patterns in Historical Texts.
Maxim Romanov, Postdoctoral Researcher, Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

27 Apr, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Digital Art History.
Chiara Pidatella, Lecturer in Art History, Tufts

2 May, 12:00-1:00pm, Eaton 202
Representing Influence: writing about text reuse when everything is online.
Ioannis Evrigenis, Professor of Political Science, Tufts University
Monica Berti, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities, University of Leipzig

For information, contact Thomas Koentges (thomas.koentges@tufts.edu) at Tufts or Matt Munson (munson@dh.uni-leipzig.de) at Leipzig.

MicroPasts: Crowd and community fuelled archaeological research

Sunday, February 14th, 2016

UCL Centre for Digital Humanities seminar
Daniel Pett, ‘MicroPasts: Crowd and community fuelled archaeological research’.

When: Wednesday 24th February 17:30 – 19:00
Where: Arts and Humanities Common Room, G24, Foster Court, UCL, London, WC1E 6BT

This seminar, given by Daniel Pett (ICT Advisor at the British Museum), will focus on the AHRC funded MicroPasts project, a collaboration between the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, the British Museum and the public. This project had 3 strands of research, crowdsourcing, crowdfunding and 3D. Two aspects were extremely successful, one was not.

The MicroPasts project has looked at a wide range of periods, topics and institutions, working with the Petrie Museum, Mary Rose Museum and British Museum collections for instance, to produce open data, open source software and an open attitude. A demonstration of what can be achieved by a small team, using open source technology to work in tandem with an amazing contributing crowd will be made, with illustration provided by various 3D prints and models.

Speaker:
Daniel Pett joined the British Museum in 2003 after a career in telecommunications and Investment Banking. He is responsible for the delivery of the award-winning Portable Antiquities Scheme website and is currently running a wide array of digital public archaeology projects including the Day of Archaeology.

All welcome and there will be drinks and discussion after the talk. Please note that registration is required.

Seminar: Networks in the Ancient World (Oxford)

Friday, January 22nd, 2016

Please find below the programme for the Corpus Christi College Classical Seminar programme HT 2016. All papers will take place on Wednesdays at 5 PM in the Seminar Room, Corpus Christi College, Merton Street, Oxford. The full programme is available at: https://www.ccc.ox.ac.uk/Seminars/

All are welcome to attend.

Networks in the Ancient World

27th January
Elton Barker (Open): Network thinking: textual maps, conceptual frameworks, scholarly practice

3rd February
Eivind Heldaas Seland (Bergen): Rome and the not so friendly king: The social networks of local rulers in the Roman Near East

10th February
Tom Brughmans (Konstanz): The potential of network science for archaeology illustrated through a network study of the Roman economy

17th February
William Mack (Birmingham): Social Networking for Poleis

24th February
Irad Malkin (Tel Aviv): title tbc

2nd March
John Tully (Cardiff): Social Proxenoi: SNA in the Hellenistic Cyclades

9th March
Esther Eidinow (Nottingham): ‘What Will You Give Me?’: Networks, Narratives and the Sacred

For a printable poster for the series or any other enquiries please contact: virginia.campbell@classics.ox.ac.uk

Call for Papers: 2016 Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities has established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities and Social Sciences, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Monday from April 11th until early July 2016 in the form of 90-minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists. Furthermore, we proudly announce that Prof. Dr. Stefan Gradmann (KU Leuven) will be giving the opening keynote on April 11th.

We invite submissions of abstracts describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the humanities, both in the past and present. We also encourage contributions describing ‘work-in-progress’. Themes may include – but are not limited to –  text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, lexical and conceptual resources for DH, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data.

For more information please visit: http://etrap.gcdh.de/call-for-papers-2016-gottingen-dialog-in-digital-humanities/

SunoikisisDC 2016 Planning Seminar

Thursday, November 26th, 2015

SunoikisisDC is an international consortium of Digital Classics programs developed by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig in collaboration with the Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies and Perseids.

SunoikisisDC offers a teaching program focused on the application of digital technologies to the study of Greek and Latin. Master students of both the humanities and computer science are welcome to join the courses online and work together by contributing to digital classics projects in a collaborative environment. Planning seminars and courses are organized by the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig in collaboration with the Center for Hellenic Studies and Perseids.

On December 16-17, 2015 Faculty members of SunoikisisDC will meet at the University of Leipzig for the SunoikisisDC 2016 Planning Seminar. On this occasion they will present their teaching activities and work together on the syllabus for the new SunoikisisDC course that will be offered in the Spring 2016:

Wednesday, December 16

09:00-09:15: Introduction (Monica Berti, University of Leipzig)
09:15-10:00: Presentation (Gregory R. Crane, Tufts University & University of Leipzig)
10:00-10:45: Sunoikisis at the Center for Hellenic Studies (Kenny Morrell, Center for Hellenic Studies)
10:45-11:00: Coffee Break
11:00-11:30: Sunoikisis Digital Classics (Monica Berti, University of Leipzig)
11:30-12:00: The Digital Hill (Marcel Mernitz, University of Leipzig)
12:00-12:30: The Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (Tariq Yousef, University of Leipzig)
12:30-13:00: Discussion

13:00-14:30: Break for lunch and informal meetings

14:30-15:00: Treebanking (Giuseppe G.A. Celano and Anastasia Mellano, University of Leipzig)
15:00-15:30: Database of Mycenaean at the University of Oslo (Federico Aurora, University of Olso)
15:30-16:00: Digital Classics in Croatia (Neven Jovanović, University of Zagreb)
16:00-16:15: Coffee break
16:15-16:45: Digital Classics in Lyon (Michèle Brunet, Laboratoire HISOMA, Lyon)
16:45-17:15: Digital Classics in Paris (Aurélien Berra, Université Paris Ouest)
17:15-17:45: Digital Classics in Brazil (Anise D’Orange Ferreira, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Câmpus de Araraquara)
17:45-18:15: Digital Classics in Freiburg (Stylianos Chronopoulos, University of Freiburg)
18:15-18:45: Discussion

Thursday, December 17

09:00-09:30: Student training and interdisciplinary approaches at the ICS London (Gabriel Bodard, Institute of Classical Studies, London)
09:30-10:00: Digital Classics in Florida (Eleni Bozia, University of Florida)
10:00-10:30: Digital Classics in Finland (Marja Vierros, University of Helsinki)
10:30-10:45: Coffee break
10:45-11:15: Digital Classics in Bulgaria (Dimitar Illiev, University of Sofia)
11:15-11:45: Reading Thucydides in Persian (Maryam Foradi, University of Leipzig)
11:45-12:15: Aristotle in Arabic (Mohammad J. Esmaeili, University of Teheran)
12:15-12:45: Digital Classics in Egypt (Usama A. Gad, Ain Shams University, Cairo)
12:45-13:15: Discussion

13:15-15:00: Break for lunch and informal meetings

15:00-15:30: Digital Classics at Tufts University (Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University)
15:30-16:30: Perseids (Tim Buckingham, Tufts University)
16:30-16:45: Coffee break
16:45-19:00: SunoikisisDC Syllabus

Digital Classicist London live-casts

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

For the first time this year, the Digital Classicist London seminars will be live-cast via the Web, so colleagues who are unable to make it to the events themselves at 16:30 (British Summer Time) on a Friday afternoon, can watch and listen along at the DCLS YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIamtu1Z62wL5XRk2mE8HKw

Or watch the edited video which will appear in the same page a few days later.

For those who need a reminder, the seminars run every Friday afternoon in June – August, and this year’s programme can be found at:

http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2015.html

Linked Data for the Humanities Workshop in Oxford

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

Via Terhi Nurmikko:

Linked Data for the Humanities Workshop: A semantic web of scholarly data
Part of the Digital Humanities Oxford Summer School, held 20th – 24th July 2015.
Book your place via http://dhoxss.humanities.ox.ac.uk/2015/linkeddata.html

Come and learn from experts and engage with participants from around the world, from every field and career stage. Develop your knowledge and acquire new skills to support your interest in Linked Data for the Humanities. Immerse yourself in this specialist topic for a week, and widen your horizons through the keynote and additional sessions.

The Linked Data in the Humanities workshop introduces the concepts and technologies behind Linked Data and the Semantic Web and teaches attendees how they can publish their research so that it is available in these forms for reuse by other humanities scholars, and how to access and manipulate Linked Data resources provided by others. The Semantic Web tools and methods described over the week use distinct but interwoven models to represent services, data collections, workflows, and the domain of an application. Topics covered will include: the RDF format; modelling your data and publishing to the web; Linked Data; querying RDF data using SPARQL; and choosing and designing vocabularies and ontologies.

The workshop comprises a series of lectures and hands-on tutorials. Lectures introduce theoretical concepts in the context of Semantic Web systems deployed in and around the humanities, many of which are introduced by their creators. Each lecture is paired with a practical session in which attendees are guided through their own exploration of the topics covered.

Book your place via http://dhoxss.humanities.ox.ac.uk/2015/linkeddata.html

For more information about the Digital Humanities Oxford Summmer School, see http://dhoxss.humanities.ox.ac.uk/2015/ .

Summer School on 3D Data in Anthropology and Archaeology at Bologna

Wednesday, May 20th, 2015

Noted on the web page of the Department of Cultural Heritage at the University of Bologna: a summer short-course entitled “Acquiring and post-processing 3D data in Anthropology and Archaeology”. To be taught in English, the course is advertised run 1-10 July 2015 in Bologna. Registration and a deposit on the course fee must be made prior to 31 May; full payment of 2.100 € (lectures, network access, course materials, coffee, and lunches inclusive) is due by June 20th.

Further information is available via the Department’s online announcement.

Digital Classicist London seminar, summer 2015

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

Summer 2015 programme

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies seminars

Meetings are on Fridays at 16:30 in room G21A*, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

(*except June 14 in Room 348; June 26 and July 3, not in ICS—see below)

ALL WELCOME

Seminars will be followed by refreshments

Jun 5 Jen Hicks (UCL) From lost archives to digital databases (abstract)
Jun 12 Leif Isaksen, Pau de Soto (Southampton), Elton Barker (Open University) and Rainer Simon (Vienna) Pelagios and Recogito: an annotation platform for joining a linked data world (abstract) Rm 348
Jun 19 Emma Payne (UCL) Digital comparison of 19th century plaster casts and original classical sculptures (abstract)
Jun 26 Various speakers (King, Knight, Kyvernitou, Rublack, Steiner, Vannini) Short presentations from Digital Humanities / Digital Classics MA students (titles and abstracts) (UCL Foster Court G31)
Jul 3 Francesca Giovannetti, Asmita Jain, Ethan Jean-Marie, Paul Kasay, Emma King, Theologis Strikos, Argula Rublack and Kaijie Ying (King’s College London) The Pedagogical Value of Postgraduate Involvement in Digital Humanities Departmental Projects (abstract) (KCL, 26-29 Drury Lane, rm 212)
Jul 10 Monica Berti, Gregory R. Crane (Leipzig), Kenny Morrell (Center for Hellenic Studies) Sunoikisis DC – An International Consortium of Digital Classics Programs (abstract)
Jul 17 Hugh Cayless (Duke) Integrating Digital Epigraphies (IDEs) (abstract)
Jul 24 Saskia Peels (Liège) A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms Project (CGRN) (abstract)
Jul 31 Federico Aurora (Oslo) DAMOS – Database of Mycenaean at Oslo (abstract)
Aug 7 Usama Gad (Heidelberg) Graecum-Arabicum-Latinum Encoded Corpus (GALEN©) (abstract)
Aug 14 Sarah Hendriks (Oxford) Digital technologies and the Herculaneum Papyri (abstract)

(Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Hugh Bowden, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman.)

CfP: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities (GDDH) has established a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Social Science, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Tuesday at 5pm from late April until early July 2015 in the form of 90 minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists.

We invite submissions of complete papers describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the Humanities, both in the past and present. Themes may include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based
modelling, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data. Papers should be written in English. Successful papers will be submitted for publication as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). Furthermore, the author(s) of the best paper will receive a prize of €500, which will be awarded on the basis of both the quality and the delivery of the paper.

A small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Full papers should be sent by March 20th to gkraft@gcdh.de in Word .docx format. There is no limitation in length but the suggested minimum is 5000 words. The full programme, including the venue of the dialogs, will be sent to you by April 1st.

For any questions, do not hesitate to contact gkraft@gcdh.de
For further information and updates, visit http://www.gcdh.de/en/events/gottingen-dialog-digital-humanities/

GDDH Board (in alphabetical order):

Camilla Di Biase-Dyson (Georg August University Göttingen)
Marco Büchler (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jens Dierkes (Göttingen eResearch Alliance)
Emily Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Greta Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Angelo Mario Del Grosso (ILC-CNR, Pisa, Italy)
Berenike Herrmann (Georg August University Göttingen)
Péter Király (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Gabriele Kraft (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Bärbel Kröger (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Maria Moritz (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Sarah Bowen Savant (Aga Khan University, London, UK)
Oliver Schmitt (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Sree Ganesh Thotempudi (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jörg Wettlaufer (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities & Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Ulrike Wuttke (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

This event is financially supported by the German Ministry of Education and Research (No. 01UG1509).

Digital Classicist New England, Spring 2015

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

We are pleased to announce the schedule for Digital Classicist New England. This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organized in association with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University. It will run during the spring term of the academic year 2014/15.

Seminars will run from February through April 2015 and will be hosted at Brandeis, Holy Cross, Northeastern and Tufts. Each lecture will take place from 12:00-1:15pm Eastern Standard time–while light snacks and drinks will be provided, attendees are also welcome to bring their own lunch!

As with the previous series, the video recordings of the presentations will be broadcast in realtime via videochat for later publication online, and questions for speakers will be accepted via an IRC channel. There are plans to publish papers selected from the first series of the seminar as a special issue in an appropriate open access journal.

Information concerning how to access the realtime video of the talks will be made available here shortly before the lecture.

We will continue to update the schedule  over the course of the spring with more information concerning each speaker. Flyers and other materials for printing and publicity can be found in the Google Drive folder here, which we will also continue to update with individual flyers for each speaker.

This series is supported by Brandeis University, including the Brandeis Library and Technology Services and the Department of Classical Studies, The College of the Holy Cross, Northeastern University, Tufts University and the Perseus Project. The series has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating 50 Years of Excellence.

Digital Classics: Ancient History Seminar, Oxford, Hilary 2015

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

Ancient History Seminar, Hilary Term 2015
Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford

(Full programme and webcast links)

Convenor: Jonathan Prag
A series of seminars looking at a number of current major projects to apply digital techniques to the study of the ancient world. These seminars will be webcast using the Panopto software.

Tuesdays, 5pm
Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Oxford

20 January 2015
Dr Elton Barker (Open University)
Mapping Herodotus: countercartography, networks and bottomless maps
http://pelagios-project.blogspot.co.uk/p/about-pelagios.html and http://hestia.open.ac.uk/

27 January
Dr James Cummings (University of Oxford)
What is TEI? And Why Should I Care?
http://www.tei-c.org/index.xml

3 February
Dr Pietro Liuzzo (EAGLE)
The Europeana best practice network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy
http://www.eagle-network.eu/

10 February
Prof. Mark Depauw (KU Leuven)
Trismegistos: A Tool for the Study of the Ancient World
http://www.trismegistos.org/

24 February
Dr Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London)
Bringing People Together: Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies (SNAP:DRGN)
http://snapdrgn.net/

3 March
Dr Monica Berti (University of Leipzig)
The Digital Marmor Parium
http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/projects/open-greek-and-latin-project/digital-marmor-parium/

10 March
Prof. Andrew Meadows (University of Oxford)
Sharing the Wealth: Numismatics in a World of Linked Open Data
http://nomisma.org/

All talks start at 5pm, and are followed by discussion and drinks.

If you wish to dine with the speaker afterwards, at a local restaurant, please contact the convenor : jonathan.prag @ merton.ox.ac.uk.

Digital Classicist London 2015 CFP

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Hugh Bowden, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 20-24, 2015

Monday, January 12th, 2015

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 20-24, 2015. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, Vindolanda Tablets Online, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri and Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and is also being used by Perseus Digital Library and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email simona.stoyanova@informatik.uni-leipzig.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by Friday February 27th, 2015.

Digital Classicist New England seminar 2015 CFP

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

[original link]

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the third series of the Digital Classicist New England (Boston). This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organized in association with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University. It will run during the spring term of the academic year 2014/15.

We invite submissions on any kind of research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the ancient world. We encourage contributions not only from students of Greco-Roman but also from other areas of the pre-modern world, such as Egypt and the Near East, Ancient China and India.

Themes may include digital editions, natural language processing, image processing and visualisation, linked data and the semantic web, open access, spatial and network analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. We welcome seminar proposals addressing the application of these methods to individual projects, and particularly contributions which show how the digital component can facilitate the crossing of disciplinary boundaries and answering new research questions. Seminar content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, as well as to information scientists and digital humanists, with an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of these fields.

Anonymised abstracts [1] of 500 words max. (bibliographic references excluded) should be uploaded by midnight (CET) on 01 November 2014 using the special submission form. When submitting the same proposal for consideration to multiple venues, please do let us know via the submission form (to be posted later).

Seminars will run from mid-January through April 2015 and will be hosted at Brandeis, Holy Cross, Northeastern and Tufts. The full programme, including the venue of each seminar, will be finalised and announced in December. In order to facilitate real-time participation from California to Europe, seminars will take place in the early afternoon and will be accessible online as Google Hangouts.

As with the previous series, the video recordings of the presentations will be published online and we endeavour to provide accommodation for the speakers and contribute towards their travel expenses. There are plans to publish papers selected from the first series of the seminar as a special issue in an appropriate open access journal.

[1] The anonymized abstract should have all author names, institutions and references to the authors work removed. This may lead to some references having to be replaced by “Reference to authors’ work”. The abstract title and author names with affiliations are entered into the submission system in separate fields.

Organizing committee:

Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University
Gregory Crane, Tufts and Leipzig
Stella Dee, University of Leipzig
Leonard Muellner, Brandeis University
Maxim Romanov, Tufts University
David A. Smith, Northeastern University
David Neel Smith, College of the Holy Cross

Editing Texts and Digital Libraries: 2 seminars in Leipzig

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Posted for Greta Franzini:

Next week the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities is hosting two seminars as part of its Digital Philology course:

1) Monday May 19th, 3:15-4:45pm, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“Editing Texts in Context: Two Case Studies” by Rebecca Finnigan, Christine Bannan and Prof. Neel D. Smith, College of the Holy Cross

2) Tuesday May 20th, 9:15-10:45am, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“digilibLT – a Digital Library of Late Latin Texts” by Prof. Maurizio Lana, Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)

For more information, please visit http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/news-announcements/

Digital Classicist London seminars, 2014

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2014

Fridays at 16:30 in room G37* Senate House
Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU
* Unless otherwise specified below

June 6* Ségolène Tarte (Oxford), On Cognition and the Digital in the Study of Ancient Textual Artefacts 103 (Holden Room)
June 13* Victoria Moul & Charlotte Tupman (King’s College London), Neo-Latin poetry in English manuscripts, 1550-1700 103 (Holden Room)
June 20 Lorna Richardson (University College London), Public Archaeology in a Digital Age
June 27 Monica Berti, Greta Franzini & Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig), The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series and Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum Projects
July 4* Pietro Liuzzo (Heidelberg), The Europeana network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy (EAGLE) and Linked Open Data 102 (Athlone Room)
July 11 Silke Vanbeselaere (Leuven), Retracing Theban Witness Networks in Demotic Contracts
July 18* Thibault Clérice (King’s College London), Clotho: Network Analysis and Distant Reading on Perseus Latin Corpus G34
July 25* Marja Vierros (Helsinki), Papyrology and Linguistic Annotation: How can we make TEI EpiDoc XML corpus and Treebanking work together? G35
Aug 1 Sebastian Rahtz (Oxford) & Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies: Data and Relations in Greco-Roman Names (SNAP:DRGN)
Aug 8 Dominic Oldman & Barry Norton (British Museum), A new approach to Digital Editions of Ancient Manuscripts using CIDOC-CRM, FRBRoo and RDFa
Aug 15 Various postgraduate speakers, Short presentations

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk, Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk, S.Mahony@ucl.ac.uk or Charlotte.Tupman@kcl.ac.uk, or see the seminar website at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2014.html

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, March 10th, 2014

We have had requests for a few days’ extension to the deadline for abstracts and consider it only fair to extend that to everyone. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014

See earlier CFP for full details.

Course on Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing

Friday, January 24th, 2014

Via an email from Katie Green to the Antiquist list:

Digital Data and Archaeology: Management, Preservation and Publishing
Mon 3 to Tue 4 Mar 2014
Rewley House 1 Wellington Square Oxford OX1 2JA

Through a series of presentations, practical sessions and group discussions, this course will explore the importance of digital preservation for the long term safety of archaeological data and provide practical guidance on how to prepare, curate, deposit and access digital data. The course will also provide guidance on data publishing online and introduce Linked Open Data for archaeology. The course is aimed primarily at archaeology data creators and data curators operating in national agency and local authority heritage environments. However this course will also be of benefit to professionals working in commercial, independent and research environments and to community groups utilising and creating archaeological data. The course will be of particular interest to those who maintain large data sets and need to efficiently manage, effectively preserve and provide access to their data for the future.

More details available here: http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/details.php?id=V400-325&Category=800
If you have any questions about this course, please email professional.arch@conted.ox.ac.uk.

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

Monday, January 6th, 2014

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014. (Note new deadline.)

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: www.digitalclassicist.org/wip

DCSB 2013/2014: programme now online

Monday, October 7th, 2013

We are glad to announce to the community that this year’s #DigiClass Berlin seminar programme has now been published:

All seminars will be video recorded and the videos, as well as the slides, will be available from the programme page.

Digital Classicist London Videocasts

Friday, August 16th, 2013

The videocasts for all the 2013 Digital Classicist London summer seminars are now available online at the Seminar Programme page. Each presentation is available as a downloadable or streamable video (MP4), or, for those who prefer audio, as MP3. Slideshows have also been made available in PDF format, although these are generally included in the video as well. Users can receive updates to the series, including videos from the London, Berlin, and occasional other seminars, by subscribing to the Seminar RSS Feed, or following @Stoaorg on Twitter.

Many thanks to our excellent videographer Wilma Stefani for filming and editing the videos, and to all our speakers for permission to share their presentations and slides.

(Thanks also to Christina Kamposiori, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale who helped with the organization and management of the seminars every week.)

Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).