Archive for the ‘seminar’ Category

Digital Classicist Seminar 2011, CFP

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Call for Papers

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars in Summer 2011, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. Themes could include, but are by no means limited to, visualization, information and data linking, digital textual and linguistic studies, and geographic information and network analysis; so long as the content is likely to be of interest both to classicists / ancient historians / archaeologists and information scientists / digital humanists, and would be considered serious research in at least one of those fields.

The seminars run on Friday afternoons (16:30 – 19:00) from June to mid-August in Senate House, London, and are hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (University of London). In previous years collected papers from the Digital Classicist seminars have been published in an online special issue of Digital Medievalist, a printed volume from Ashgate Press, a BICS supplement (in production), and the last three years have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

We have a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by April 15th, 2011. We shall announce the full programme at the end of April.

(Coörganised by Will Wootton, Charlotte Tupman, Matteo Romanello, Simon Mahony, Timothy Hill, Alejandro Giacometti, Juan Garcés, Stuart Dunn & Gabriel Bodard.)

What is Web 2.0?

Monday, October 25th, 2010

This blog post is the introduction to a lecture on Publishing and Web 2.0 I am delivering to students on the Digital Humanities MA, and is partly intended as a venue for online discussion in the comments section. All are welcome to join in the discussion.

When I posted the question, “What is Web 2.0?” on Twitter at the weekend, the first reply was from @espenore, who wrote:

A buzzword 10 years ago :-)

Leading me to muse:

Does this mean that 2004’s “Web 2.0″ is 2010’s “The Web”?

More seriously, most online definitions of Web 2.0 focus on the dynamic nature of Web content:

“The second generation of the World Wide Web, especially the movement away from static webpages to dynamic and shareable content and social networking”
(Wiktionary)

and

“Web 2.0 does not refer to any specific change in the technology of the Internet, but rather the behavior of how people use the Internet”
(Twinity)

and

“Le web 2.0 se caractérise principalement par la prise de pouvoir des internautes”
(Novaterra)

The idea that the Web is not controlled by a top-down, monolithic publishing industry, but an organic, uncontrolled, intelligent network authored and edited by all users is a powerful one. (On of the nicest descriptions of this is The Machine is Us/ing Us .) There is a lot of monolithic content on the Web, of course, and this is sometimes among the more professional and reliable material out there, but almost every web search returns pages from Wikipedia and blogs high in the results list.

It has become the norm to see the Web as a place to post content, to add comments, to correct errors and omissions (or introduce errors and misinformation). Obviously, this is no longer about new technology or tools; all this dynamic functionality has been around for a long time (in Internet terms) and is both the norm and visible on the vast majority of the Web, so the rhetoric of “version 2.0″ is broken. Rather it is a subset of the kind of activity that takes place on the Web: leaving comments rather than just reading news; editing rather than just reading Wikipedia; reviewing rather than just buying books; even searching the Web with cookies enabled.

In this lecture we’re going to discuss the implications of this dynamic and semantic Web on publishing, and especially academic output. We’ll look at a few examples of blogs (The Stoa Consortium, AH Net, DH Now), wikis (Digiclass, Academic Publishing, Uncyclopedia), and talk about the kinds of scholarly activities that are appropriate to publishing in these media.

Watch the comments to see how convincing this all turned out to be.

(My slides for this class are available as an Open Access Google presentation.)

Digital Classicist 2010 seminars

Monday, May 24th, 2010

Digital Classicist 2010 summer seminar programme
Institute of Classical Studies

Meetings are on Fridays at 16:30
in room STB9 (Stewart House)
Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

*ALL WELCOME*
Seminars will be followed by refreshments

  • Jun 4 Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
    Reading Between the Lines: unearthing structure in Ptolemy’s Geography
  • Jun 11 Hafed Walda (King’s College London) and Charles Lequesne (RPS Group)
    Towards a National Inventory for Libyan Archaeology
  • Jun 18 Timothy Hill (King’s College London)  
    After Prosopography? Data modelling, models of history, and new directions for a scholarly genre.
  • Jun 25 Matteo Romanello (King’s College London)       
    Towards a Tool for the Automatic Extraction of Canonical References
  • Jul 2 Mona Hess (University College London)  
    3D Colour Imaging For Cultural Heritage Artefacts
  • Jul 16 Annemarie La Pensée (National Conservation Centre) and Françoise Rutland (World Museum Liverpool)
    Non-contact 3D laser scanning as a tool to aid identification and interpretation of archaeological artefacts: the case of a Middle Bronze Age Hittite Dice
  • Jul 23 Mike Priddy (King’s College London)
    On-demand Virtual Research Environments: a case study from the Humanities
  • Jul 30 Monica Berti (Torino) and Marco Büchler (Leipzig)
    Fragmentary Texts and Digital Collections of Fragmentary Authors
  • Aug 6 Kathryn Piquette (University College London)
    Material Mediates Meaning: Exploring the artefactuality of writing utilising qualitative data analysis software
  • Aug 13 Linda Spinazzè (Venice)
    Musisque Deoque. Developing new features: manuscripts tracing on the net

For more information on individual seminars and updates on the programme, see http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2010.html

Digital Classicist 2010 Seminars CFP

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, with support from the British Library, in Summer 2010 on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that demonstrates interdisciplinarity or work on the intersections between Ancient History, Classics or Archaeology and a digital, technical or practice-based discipline.

The Digital Classicist seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published(*) in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008-9); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series. A small budget is available to help with travel costs.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2010. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Regards,

The organizers

Gabriel Bodard, King’s College London
Stuart Dunn, King’s College London
Juan Garcés, Greek Manuscripts Department, British Library
Simon Mahony, University College London
Melissa Terras, University College London

(more…)

Relationships Between Classics and Museums (Cambridge)

Friday, January 29th, 2010

(While this is not strictly a digital Classics series, the interdisciplinary questions and issues of cultural heritage and curation being discussed ought to be of interest to Stoa readers. If anyone is attending these seminars we would be delighted to post short reports or reactions here.)

Two worlds colliding?: the relationships between Classics and Museums
organised by Dr Kate Cooper, Fitzwilliam Museum

Tuesdays at 4.30pm Room 1.04 Faculty of Classics (Sidgwick Site), Cambridge. All Welcome.

26th January Professor Robin Cormack (Courtauld Institute of Art & Faculty of Classics, Cambridge)
Perspectives from the outside: curating temporary loan exhibitions at the Royal Academy and elsewhere.

2nd February Dr Susan Walker (Keeper of Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum)
Change and flow: the new Ashmolean

9th February Dr Lucilla Burn (Keeper of Antiquities, Fitzwilliam Museum)
How do the Greek and Roman collections of the Fitzwilliam Museum and their display relate to the study of Classics?

16th February Dr Andrew Burnett (Deputy Director, The British Museum)
International issues and museums today

23rd February Dr Roger Bland (Head of the Department of Portable Antiquities and Treasure, The British Museum)
A license to loot or archaeological rescue? The Portable Antiquities Scheme in England and Wales

2nd March Dr Timothy Potts (Director, The Fitzwilliam Museum)
Museums and the preservation of archaeological heritage: past practice and future prospects

Spacial Analysis in Archaeology (seminars)

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Contemporary Roles for Spatial Analysis in Archaeology

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Seminar Series (January–March 2010)
31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
Mondays 4pm, Room 612 (followed by a wine reception)

Timetable

11 January 2010 – Benjamin Ducke (Oxford Archaeology)
‘Science without software no longer. Archaeological data analysis and the Open Source paradigm’

18 January 2010 – Chris Green (University of Leicester)
‘Temporal GIS and archaeology’

25 January 2010 – Tony Wilkinson (Durham University)
‘From household to region: incorporating agency into the interpretation of regional settlement’

1 February 2010 – Tim Williams (University College London)
‘Earth viewers and GIS in archaeological resource management: access and accessibility’

8 February 2010 – Luke Premo (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary
Anthropology)
‘A spatially explicit model of Early Stone Age archaeological landscapes’

15 February 2010 (Reading Week – no seminar)

22 February 2010 – Frederic Fol Leymarie (Goldsmiths College)
‘Advances in 3D procedural modelling with applications to archaeology’

1 March 2010 – Michael Barton (Arizona State University)
‘Stories of the past or science of the future? Archaeology and computational social science’

8 March 2010 – Irmela Herzog (Archaeological Heritage Management of the Rhineland)
‘Patterns of movement, least cost paths and our understanding of the archaeological record’

15 March 2010 – Kate Devlin (Goldsmiths College)
‘Illuminating virtual reconstructions of past environments’

22 March 2010 – Mark Lake (University College London)
‘Rewind and fast‐forward: how archaeological GIS analyses recapitulate general theory’

Digital Classicist seminar update

Friday, May 29th, 2009

There has been a small change to the programme for the Digital Classicist/ICS Work-in-Progress seminar series.

The earlier post has been updated with the full details.
See: http://www.stoa.org/?p=909

Simon

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress seminar series

Friday, May 15th, 2009

We are very pleased to announce the programme for this summer’s Digital Classicist seminar series.

Digital Classicist/ICS Work in Progress Seminar, Summer 2009

Fridays at 16:30 in STB3/6 (Stewart House), Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

(NB: July 17th seminar in British Library, 96 Euston Rd, NW1 2DW)

June 5: Bart Van Beek (Leuven)
‘Onomastics and Name-extraction in Graeco-Egyptian Papyri’

June 12: Philip Murgatroyd (Birmingham)
‘Starting out on the Journey to Manzikert: Agent-based modelling and
Mediaeval warfare logistics’

June 19: Mark Hedges & Tobias Blanke (King’s College London)
‘Linking and Querying Ancient Texts: A multi-database case study with epigraphic corpora”

June 26: Marco Büchler & Annette Loos (Leipzig)
‘Textual Re-use of Ancient Greek Texts: A case study on Plato’s works’

July 3: Roger Boyle & Kia Ng (Leeds) *NB: in room:STB 9*
‘Extracting the Hidden: Paper Watermark Location and Identification’

July 10: Cristina Vertan (Hamburg)
‘Teuchos: An Online Knowledge-based Platform for Classical Philology’

July 17: Christine Pappelau (Berlin) *NB: in British Library*
‘Roman Spolia in 3D: High Resolution Leica 3D Laser-scanner meets
ancient building structures’

July 24: Elton Barker (Oxford)
‘Herodotos Encoded Space-Text-Imaging Archive’

July 31: Leif Isaksen (Southampton)
‘Linking Archaeological Data’

August 7: Alexandra Trachsel (Hamburg)
‘An Online Edition of the Fragments of Demetrios of Skepsis’

ALL WELCOME

We are inviting both students and established researchers involved in the application of the digital humanities to the study of the ancient world to come and introduce their work. The focus of this seminar series is the interdisciplinary and collaborative work that results at the interface of expertise in Classics or Archaeology and computer Science.

The seminars will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact any of the following:
Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk
Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk
Juan.Garces@bl.uk
Simon.Mahony@kcl.ac.uk
or see the seminar website at
http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2009.html

Metadata Workshops in Michigan, 7 May 2009

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

Aimed at Medievalists but may also be of interest to Classicists…

The Medieval Academy of America’s Committee on Electronic Resources is pleased to announce two workshops to be held at the International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo, MI, in May 2009. Both workshops will be on Thursday, May 7 (sessions 54 and 166; see http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/sessions.html for complete conference schedule).

Workshop registration online at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d

1) Metadata for Medievalists I: Introduction to Metadata Formats
Session 54, Thursday 7 May, 10am

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, led by Sheila Bair, Western Michigan University’s Metadata Librarian. Instruction includes an introduction to the concept of metadata, an overview of metadata types of interest to medievalists working in a variety of textual and image formats, and an overview of methods for metadata implementations (database, encoded data, printed copy, etc.). Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

2) Metadata for Medievalists II: Introduction to the Text-Encoding Initiative
Session 166, Thursday 7 May, 3:30pm

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, taught by a medievalist, Dot Porter, specifically for medievalists. Instruction includes introductory-level XML and structural encoding, as well as TEI P5 standards and guidelines, markup concerns for medieval transcription, and a brief consideration of XML Editors. Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

Sheila Bair is the Metadata Librarian at Western Michigan University and holds an MS in Library Science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dot Porter is the Metadata Manager at the Digital Humanities Observatory, Royal Irish Academy, in Dublin, Ireland. She has an MA in Medieval Studies from Western Michigan University and an MS in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill, and extensive experience in text encoding in the medieval studies and classics.

Both workshops are limited to 35 participants, and registration is required.

The pre-registration fee per workshop for students is $40/$55 (Medieval Academy members/nonmembers), for non-students is $50/$65.

To register, complete the online form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d
Questions about registration should be directed to James W. Brodman at jimb[at]uca.edu
Questions about the workshops should be directed to Dot Porter at dot.porter[at]gmail.com

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Wednesday, February 4th, 2009

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of Work-in-Progress seminars in Summer 2009, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that involves equal collaboration with a computer scientist or that would be considered serious research in the Computing field as well as Classics, Archaeology, and/or Ancient History.

The Work-in-Progress seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London, and are sponsored by the Institute for Classical Studies (UofL), the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (KCL), the Centre for e-Research (KCL), and the British Library. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2009. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Best regards,

Gabriel Bodard (CCH)
Stuart Dunn (CeRch)
Juan Garcés (BL)
Simon Mahony (CCH)

Digital Classicist Occasional Seminars: Lamé on digital epigraphy

Tuesday, November 4th, 2008

For those who are not subscribed to the Digital Classicist podcast RSS, I’d like to call attention to the latest “occasional seminar” audio and slides online: Marion Lamé spoke about “Epigraphical encoding: from the Stone to Digital Edition” in the internation video-conference series European Culture and Technology. Marion talked about her PhD project which is to use an XML-encoded edition of the Res Gestae Diui Augusti as an exercise in digital recording and presentation of an extremely important and rich historical text and encoding historical features in the markup.

We shall occasionally record and upload (with permission) presentations of interest to digital classicists that are presented in other venues and series. If you would be interested in contributing a presentation to this series, please contact me or someone else at the Digital Classicist.