Archive for the ‘Teaching’ Category

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 28-May 1, 2014

Monday, January 13th, 2014

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, London, April 28-May 1, 2014. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday February 21st, 2014.

Which beginners’ Ancient Greek textbook(s) do you use?

Friday, May 17th, 2013

Dear colleagues,

Please could you take a moment to fill in this survey on the use of textbooks for the teaching of beginners’ Ancient Greek. Only the first three questions are obligatory, and the whole survey should only take a minute to complete. Please circulate this request to any colleagues or communities who may not have seen it here.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FBJ39QL

I’ll post a summary of results to Stoa.org when I’ve collated them in a few weeks time.

A couple of notes:

1. Please answer the questions with regard to your own teaching: only include classes taught by others if you are sure no one else will include them in their answers. (e.g. if you are in a small teaching unit and your colleagues have told you they have no intention of answering). This will never be a comprehensive or reliable survey, but I’d like to avoid any blatant inaccuracy as far as possible.

2. Because of the nature of the questions, this survey is only really appropriate for the anglophone world. I’d be very interested to see more international results, but someone else would need to design the survey.

Report on e-learning panel, Classical Association 2013

Saturday, April 6th, 2013

(Report by Bartolo Natoli on the e-learning panel, April 5, 2013.)

Earlier today, the Classical Association’s Annual Conference, hosted by the University of Reading, presented two panels on ‘New Approaches to e-Learning’, a topic of growing interest in Classical Studies. The two panels boasted papers full of insights and suggestions for incorporating educational technology into both Latin and Classical Civilization classes. The first panel, consisting of papers by Jonathan Eaton and Alex Smith, focused more on how technology could be employed in classroom instruction on a macro-level. Eaton’s talk provided examples of how Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) could be used to enhance student learning and touched on the controversial topic of massive open online courses (MOOCs). Eaton suggested that VLEs be used to offer resources to students asynchronically, whereas evaluation and direct instruction be employed in a f2f setting: blended learning was a key means of maximizing learning potential. An example of such blended learning was Alex Smith’s discussion of using technology to provide students with collaborative and higher-level learning activities based on synthesis through the creation of a website in eXeLearning that was based on set lines of Latin. Students worked through both Latin content and 21st century, real-world skills such as collaboration and web design. Technology provided the medium, but was not the goal. (more…)

Open Philology Project Announced

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Via Marco Büchler, Greg Crane has just posted “The Open Philology Project and Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at Leipzig” at Perseus Digital Library Updates.

Abstract: The Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig sees in the rise of Digital Technologies an opportunity to re-assess and re-establish how the humanities can advance the understanding of the past and to support a dialogue among civilizations. Philology, which uses surviving linguistic sources to understand the past as deeply and broadly as possible, is central to these tasks, because languages, present and historical, are central to human culture. To advance this larger effort, the Humboldt Chair focuses upon enabling Greco-Roman culture to realize the fullest possible role in intellectual life. Greco-Roman culture is particularly significant because it contributed to both Europe and the Islamic world and the study of Greco-Roman culture and its influence thus entails Classical Arabic as well as Ancient Greek and Latin. The Humboldt Chair inaugurates an Open Philology Project with three complementary efforts that produce open philological data, educate a wide audience about historical languages, and integrate open philological data from many sources: the Open Greek and Latin Project organizes content (including translations into Classical Arabic and modern languages); the Historical Language e-Learning Project explores ways to support learning across barriers of language and culture as well as space and time; the Scaife Digital Library focuses on integrating cultural heritage sources available under open licenses.

Details of the project, its components, and rationale are provided in the original post.

Bursaries available for London EpiDoc training, April 2013

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

A reminder that we are inviting applications for a training event in digital encoding of epigraphy and papyrology at the Institute for Classical Studies, London, April 22-5, 2013 (see full announcement). Thanks to the generosity of the British Epigraphy Society and Society for Promotion of Roman Studies, we now have a limited number of bursaries available to assist students with attending this workshop.

If you would like to apply for financial support in attending the EpiDoc workshop, please note in your application email that you would like to be considered for a bursary, approximately how much you expect the trip to cost you, and what other sources of funding you have. If you have already applied for the training, please just send an additional email asking to be considered, and we’ll add a note to this effect to your application. A decision will be made shortly after the closing date on March 1st.

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 22-25, 2013

Friday, January 11th, 2013

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital text-markup for epigraphic and papyrological editing, to be held in the Institute for Classical Studies, London and supported by the British Epigraphy Society and Society for Promotion of Roman Studies. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), James Cowey (Heidelberg), Simona Stoyanova (KCL) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and Curse Tablets from Roman Britain, Pandektis (inscriptions of Macedonia and Thrace), and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML and markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object description in EpiDoc as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required to apply, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday March 1st, 2013.

Workshop on Canonical Text Services: Furman May 19-22, 2013

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

Posted for Christopher Blackwell:

What · With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Furman University’s Department of Classics is offering a workshop on the Canonical Text Services Protocol.

When · May 19 – 22, 2013.

Where · Greenville, South Carolina, (Wikipedia); Furman University.

Who · Applications will be accepted from anyone interested in learning about exposing canonically cited texts online with CTS. We have funds to pay for travel and lodging for six participants.

How · Apply by e-mail to christopher.blackwell@furman.edu by January 31, 2013.

For more information, see http://folio.furman.edu/workshop.html or contact christopher.blackwell@furman.edu

Working with Text in a Digital Age, RFP

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Tufts University invites applications to “Working with Text in a Digital Age”, a three-week NEH Institute for Advanced Technology in the Digital Humanities (July 23-August 10, 2012) that combines traditional topics such as TEI Markup with training in methods from Information Retrieval, Visualization, and Corpus and Computational Linguistics. Faculty, graduate students, and library professionals are encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit proposals by February 15, 2012. Participant proposals must include CVs and statements of purpose (no more than 1,000 words) describing how they will be able to use participation in the Institute to advance their subsequent careers. Participants must be committed to collaborative work and to publication of results from this Institute under a Creative Commons license. Participants should identify source materials with which they propose to work during the Institute and which must be in the public domain or available under a suitable license. In an ideal case, source materials would include both texts for intensive analysis and annotation and one or more larger corpora to be mined and analyzed more broadly. Statements of purpose must describe initial goals for the Institute. For more information or to submit applications, please contact lcerrato@perseus.tufts.edu.

We particularly encourage participants who are committed to developing research agendas that integrate contributions and research by undergraduates, that expand the global presence of the Humanities, and that, in general, broaden access to and participation in the Humanities. Preference will be given to participants who are best prepared not only to apply new technologies but to do so as a means to transform their teaching and research and the relationship of their work to society beyond academia.

EpiDoc Training Workshop

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

EpiDoc Training Workshop
5-8 September 2011
Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London

An EpiDoc training workshop will be offered by the Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London, and the Institute of Classical Studies in September this year. The workshop is free of charge and open to all, but spaces are limited and registration as soon as possible is essential.

This workshop is an introduction to the use of EpiDoc, an XML schema for the encoding and publication of inscriptions, papyri and other documentary Classical texts. Participants will study the use of EpiDoc markup to record the distinctions expressed by the Leiden Conventions and traditional critical editions, and some of the issues in translating between EpiDoc and the major epigraphic and papyrological databases. They will also be given hands-on experience in the use of the Papyrological Editor tool implemented by the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri, which facilitates the authoring of EpiDoc XML via a ‘tags-free’ interface.

The course is targeted at scholars of epigraphy and papyrology (from advanced graduate students to professors) with an interest and willingness to learn some of the hands-on technical aspects necessary to run a digital project. Knowledge of Greek and/or Latin, the Leiden Conventions and the distinctions expressed by them, and the kinds of data that need to be recorded by philologists and ancient historians, will be assumed. No particular technical expertise is required.

Places on the EpiDoc training week are limited so if you are interested in attending the workshop or have any questions, please contact charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk and gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk as soon as possible with a brief statement of qualifications and interest.

Workshop on Digital Tools in Papyrology

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

International Workshop on Digital Tools in Papyrology, Vienna.

July 18-23, 2011

This workshop, organized jointly by the Austrian National Library, the Austrian Academy of Science and Vienna University, will provide an introduction to the most important digital tools in papyrology. The program will offer a mixture of classes (in English), in which the students will get an overview of the manifold electronic resources in the field, and training sessions on the new editing platform for DDbDP, HGV, and APIS.

The workshop will also include visits to the Papyrus Collection and the Papyrus Museum of the Austrian National Library. The main teachers will be James Cowey (Universität Heidelberg), Mark Depauw (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven), Sandra Hodecek (Österreichische Nationalbibliothek), Thomas Kruse (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften), Bernhard Palme (Österreichische Nationalbibliothek/Universität Wien), Lucian Reinfandt (Universität Wien), Joshua D. Sosin (Duke University), Johannes Thomann (Universität Zürich).

The workshop will begin on Monday, 18th July with registration in the morning and courses in the afternoon, and will end on Friday, 22nd July in the evening. On Saturday, 23rd July, morning there will be a guided tour to the Ephesos Museum.

There is no fee for the course, but 125 Euros have to be charged for accommodation in a university Hall of Residence. The number of participants is restricted to 20.

Advanced students with an interest in papyrology and solid knowledge of Ancient Greek and English are invited to participate, whether they have already experience in the subject or not.

Applications, including a curriculum vitae, should be sent before July 12 to Bernhard Palme <bernhard.palme@univie.ac.at>.

What is Web 2.0?

Monday, October 25th, 2010

This blog post is the introduction to a lecture on Publishing and Web 2.0 I am delivering to students on the Digital Humanities MA, and is partly intended as a venue for online discussion in the comments section. All are welcome to join in the discussion.

When I posted the question, “What is Web 2.0?” on Twitter at the weekend, the first reply was from @espenore, who wrote:

A buzzword 10 years ago :-)

Leading me to muse:

Does this mean that 2004’s “Web 2.0″ is 2010’s “The Web”?

More seriously, most online definitions of Web 2.0 focus on the dynamic nature of Web content:

“The second generation of the World Wide Web, especially the movement away from static webpages to dynamic and shareable content and social networking”
(Wiktionary)

and

“Web 2.0 does not refer to any specific change in the technology of the Internet, but rather the behavior of how people use the Internet”
(Twinity)

and

“Le web 2.0 se caractérise principalement par la prise de pouvoir des internautes”
(Novaterra)

The idea that the Web is not controlled by a top-down, monolithic publishing industry, but an organic, uncontrolled, intelligent network authored and edited by all users is a powerful one. (On of the nicest descriptions of this is The Machine is Us/ing Us .) There is a lot of monolithic content on the Web, of course, and this is sometimes among the more professional and reliable material out there, but almost every web search returns pages from Wikipedia and blogs high in the results list.

It has become the norm to see the Web as a place to post content, to add comments, to correct errors and omissions (or introduce errors and misinformation). Obviously, this is no longer about new technology or tools; all this dynamic functionality has been around for a long time (in Internet terms) and is both the norm and visible on the vast majority of the Web, so the rhetoric of “version 2.0″ is broken. Rather it is a subset of the kind of activity that takes place on the Web: leaving comments rather than just reading news; editing rather than just reading Wikipedia; reviewing rather than just buying books; even searching the Web with cookies enabled.

In this lecture we’re going to discuss the implications of this dynamic and semantic Web on publishing, and especially academic output. We’ll look at a few examples of blogs (The Stoa Consortium, AH Net, DH Now), wikis (Digiclass, Academic Publishing, Uncyclopedia), and talk about the kinds of scholarly activities that are appropriate to publishing in these media.

Watch the comments to see how convincing this all turned out to be.

(My slides for this class are available as an Open Access Google presentation.)

DH PhD studentship at the Open University

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

Forwarded for Elton Barker, who would be happy to answer any queries:

One full-time, three year PhD studentship available from 1 January 2011
Interdisciplinary PhD Studentship in Digital Humanities
Open University – Faculty of Arts
Based in Milton Keynes

Digital Humanities at The Open University is a rapidly growing area of research. The proposed studentship is aimed at exploring the application of geographical concepts to research in the Arts and Humanities, and the ways in which they are represented, in the digital medium. We would welcome applications from candidates with an appropriate research proposal in any discipline studied in The Open University Faculty of Arts, ie Art History, Classical Studies, English, History, Music, Philosophy and Religious Studies.

Projects which will benefit from supervision across traditional disciplinary boundaries are particularly encouraged. Also encouraged are proposals with links to one of our existing research groups or collaborative projects.

For FURTHER PARTICULARS go to: http://www3.open.ac.uk/employment/job-details.asp?id=5367

Further details of Digital Humanities-related research at The Open University can be found at http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/digital-humanities/index.shtml

DH2010 and workshops

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

Registration for the 2010 Digital Humanities conference (July 7-10, 2010, King’s College London) is now open (http://dh2010.cch.kcl.ac.uk/registration.html).

In addition to the conference programme, seven workshops are offered between July 5-7. All are free for conference attendees.

  • Access to the Grid: Interfacing the Humanities with Grid technologies (Stuart Dunn)
  • Text Mining in the Digital Humanities (Marco Buechler et al., eAQUA Project)
  • Service-Oriented Computing in the Humanities (Nicolas Gold et al.)
  • Content, Compliance, Collaboration and Complexity: Creating and Sustaining Information (Joanne Evans et al.)
  • Designing a Digital Humanities Lab (Angela Veomett et al.)
  • Peer Reviewing Digital Archives: the NINES model (Dana Wheeles et al.)
  • Introduction to Text Analysis using JiTR and Voyeur (Stéfan Sinclair et al.)

To find out more about these workshops, see Workshop Programme.

DHO Summer School: EpiDoc

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

The DHO Summer School is now open for registration. The School will be held at the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin. EpiDoc is being offered as a course:

2010 DHO Summer School – Registration Now Open

www.dho.ie/ss2010

The DHO is pleased to announce that registration for the 2010 DHO Summer School, in conjunction with NINEs and the EpiDoc Collaborative, is now open.

The Summer School welcomes registrants from the various fields of the humanities, information studies, and computer science. Workshops and lectures cover subjects as diverse as text encoding, virtual worlds, and geospatial methods for the humanities. These are facilitated by leading experts, with plenty of time during evening activities for informal interaction.

This year, in addition to four-day workshop strands, the DHO is also offering mid-week, one-day workshops. For those unable to attend the entire Summer School, it is possible to register separately for these mid-week workshops and lectures.

As in previous years, the Summer School brings together Irish and International scholars undertaking digital projects in diverse areas to explore issues and trends of common interest. The programme will offer attendees opportunities to develop their skills, share insights, and discover new opportunities for collaboration and research. Activities focus on the theoretical, technical, administrative, and institutional issues relevant to the needs of digital humanities projects today.

The pricing for the full Summer School, as well as one-day workshops and lectures, is available on the registration page: http://dho.ie/ss2010/registration

Full details of the workshop strands, lectures and guest speakers can be found on the Summer School website at: www.dho.ie/ss2010

We look forward to seeing you in Dublin.

2010 DHO Summer School with NINES and EpiDoc

Monday, December 7th, 2009

2010 DHO Summer School
in conjunction with NINES and the EpiDoc Collaborative

28 June – 2 July, 2010
http://dho.ie/ss2010

The third annual Digital Humanities Observatory (DHO) Summer School will take place in Dublin from 28 June to 2 July 2010. Following the highly successful 2009 Summer School, next year’s event will see the expansion of popular workshop strands such as:
  • A Practical Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative
  • Data Visualisation for the Humanities
  • An Introduction to EpiDoc Markup and Editing Tools
  • The One to Many Text: Text Transformations with XSLT

The Summer School will feature lectures by Dr. Hugh Denard (King’s College London Visualisation Lab) and Dr Ian Gregory (University of Lancaster). Workshop facilitators include Dr Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Dr James Cowey (University of Heidelberg), Professor Laura Mandell (Miami University of Ohio), Dr Susan Schreibman (Digital Humanities Observatory), Justin Tonra (NUI, Galway) and Dana Wheeles (University of Virginia).

Major workshop strands will be conducted over four days allowing delegates to choose a mini-workshop on Wednesday from one of the following offerings:

  • Geospatial Methods for Humanities Research
  • Using Digital Resources for Irish Research and Teaching
  • Visualising Space, Time and Events: Using Virtual Worlds for Humanities Research
  • Finding the Concepts In the Chaos – Building Relationships With Data Models
  • Planning Digital Scholarly Resources: A Primer

The introduction of the one-day mini-workshops allows people to choose to attend a single-day event only at a reduced cost.

Pre-conference workshops at DH2010

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

As in previous years, the days 3-6 July, before the DH2010 conference (7-11 July at King’s College London <http://www.cch.kcl.ac.uk/dh2010>) have been set aside for community-run workshops. One can reach a diverse and committed body of participants in the Digital Humanities at DH2010. Do you or your project have a workshop up your sleeve that would interest this Digital Humanities community?

Half- or one-day slots are available for workshops, which need to be self-organized and self-funding. KCL can provide space for the workshop at no or low cost, so it is likely that the costs per participant would be low.

We would like to receive proposals for such workshops.

In your full proposal (total 500-800 words), please include:

(1) a brief description of the workshop programme, the project or community out of which it arises, the trainers who will run the workshop, and its proposed length;

(2) what is the demand for this workshop, and who do you expect the audience to be? What minimum number of attendees would be needed for you to do the workshop?

(3) what funding is available or will you seek to help to support the costs of this workshop (for instance, travel for trainers, lunch or refreshments for participants, as applicable)?

A few groups have already expressed interest in running workshops, and we have been talking informally with them. If you have ideas that is not yet fully formed, we would be delighted to e-speak to you about them before you submit a proposal.

The closing date for full proposals will be 31 December 2009. Please send them via email to both John Bradley (john.bradley@kcl.ac.uk) and Gabriel Bodard (gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk).

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

Forwarded on behalf of Peter Stokes. Note that the following is for students who are registered for PhDs in the United Kingdom.

Medieval Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age: 17-22 May 2010

The Institute of English Studies (London) is pleased to announce the second year of this AHRC-funded course in collaboration with the University of Cambridge, the Warburg Institute, and King’s College London.

The course is open to arts and humanities doctoral students registered at UK institutions. It involves six days of intensive training on the alysis, description and editing of medieval manuscripts in the digital age to be held jointly in Cambridge and London. Participants will receive a solid theoretical foundation and hands-on experience in cataloguing and editing manuscripts for both print and digital formats.

The first half of the course involves morning classes and then visits to libraries in Cambridge and London in the afternoons. Participants will view original manuscripts and gain practical experience in applying the morning’s themes to concrete examples. In the second half we will address the cataloguing and description of manuscripts in a digital format with particular emphasis on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). These sessions will also combine theoretical principles and practical experience and include supervised work on computers.

The course is aimed principally at those writing dissertations which relate to medieval manuscripts, especially those on literature, art and history. There are no fees, but priority will be given to PhD students funded by the AHRC. Class sizes are limited to twenty and places are ‘first-come-first-served’ so early registration is strongly recommended.

For further details see http://ies.sas.ac.uk/study/mmsda/ or contact
Dr Peter Stokes at mmsda@sas.ac.uk.

Practical Epigraphy Workshop

Monday, November 9th, 2009

Forwarded for Charlotte Tupman.

Practical Epigraphy Workshop

22-24 June 2010, Great North Museum, Newcastle

A Practical Epigraphy Workshop is taking place for those who are interested in developing hands-on skills in working with epigraphic material. The workshop is aimed at graduate students, but other interested parties are welcome to apply, whether or not they have previous experience. With expert tuition, participants will learn the practical aspects of how to record and study inscriptions. The programme will include the making of squeezes; photographing and measuring inscribed stones; and the production of transcriptions, translations and commentaries. Participants may choose to work on Latin or Greek texts.

The course fee is £100 but we hope to be able to provide bursaries to participants to assist with the cost. Accommodation will be extra, but we are arranging B&B nearby for around £30-40.

Places on the workshop are limited and applications will be accepted until 31st March. For further details please contact Dr. Charlotte Tupman: charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk.

The Practical Epigraphy Workshop is sponsored by The British Epigraphy Society, an independent ‘chapter’ of the Association Internationale d’Épigraphie Grecque et Latine:

http://www.csad.ox.ac.uk/BES/

http://www2.bbaw.de/aiegl

EpiDoc Training Sessions 2009

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

EpiDoc Training Sessions 2009
London 20-24 July
Rome 21-25 September

The EpiDoc community has been developing protocols for the publication of inscriptions, papyri, and other documentary Classical texts in TEI-compliant XML: for details see the community website at http://epidoc.sf.net.

Over the last few years there has been increasing demand for training by scholars wishing to use EpiDoc. We are delighted to be able to announce two training workshops, which will be offered in 2009. Both will be led by Dr Gabriel Bodard. These sessions will benefit scholars working on Greek or Latin documents with an interest in developing skills in the markup, encoding, and exploitation of digital editions. Competence in Greek and/or Latin, and knowledge of the Leiden Conventions will be assumed; no particular computer skills are required.

London session, 20-24 July 2009. This will take place at the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King’s College London, 26-29 Drury Lane. The cost of attendance will be £50 for students; £100 for employees of universities or other non-profit institutions; £200 for employees of commercial institutions. Those interested in enrolling should apply to Dr Bodard, gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by 20 June 2009.

We hope to be able to offer some follow-up internships after the session, to enable participants to consolidate their experience under supervision; please let us know if that would be of interest to you.

Rome session, 21-25 September 2009. This will take place at the British School at Rome. Thanks to the generous support of the International Association of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, the British School and Terra Italia Onlus, attendance will be free.

Those interested in enrolling should apply to Dr Silvia Orlandi, silvia.orlandi@uniroma1.it by 30 June 2009.

Practical matters
Both courses will run from Monday to Friday starting at 10:00 am and ending at 16:00 each day.

Participants should bring a wireless-enabled laptop. You should acquire and install a copy of Oxygen *and* either an educational licence ($48) or a 30-day trial licence (free). Don’t worry if you don’t know how to use it!

New MA programme in Digital Asset Management

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

Something of interest to all digital humanists.

The Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH) in collaboration with the Centre for e-Research both at King’s College London has just launched its new Masters Programme in Digital Asset Management. This complements CCH’s existing graduate programmes: MA Digital Humanities, MA Digital Culture and Technology, PhD (Digital Humanities).

There is a promotional flyer with full details at:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/content/1/c6/05/00/84/MADAMleafletfinal.pdf

All details about graduate study at CCH are at:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/depts/cch/pg/

EpiDoc Summer School, July 14th-18th, 2008

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008
The Centre for Computing in the Humanties, Kings College London, is again offering an EpiDoc Summer School, on July 14th-18th, 2008. The training is designed for epigraphers or papyrologists (or related text editors such as numismatists, sigillographers, etc.) who would like to learn the skills and tools required to mark up ancient documents for publication (online or on paper), and interchange with international academic standards.You can learn more about EpiDoc from the EpiDoc home page and the Introduction for Epigraphers; you wil find a recent and user-friendly article on the subject in the Digital Medievalist. (If you want to go further, you can learn about XML and about the principles of the TEI: Text Encoding Initiative.) The Summer School will not expect any technical expertise, and training in basic XML will be provided.

Attendees (who should be familiar with Greek/Latin and the Leiden Conventions) will need to bring a laptop on which has been installed the Oxygen XML editor (available at a reduced academic price, or for a free 30-day demo).

The EpiDoc Summer School is free to participants; we can try to help you find cheap (student) accommodation in London. If any students participating would like to stay on afterwards and acquire some hands-on experience marking up some texts for the Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica project, they would be most welcome!

All interested please contact both charlotte.roueche@kcl.ac.uk and gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk as soon as possible. Please pass on this message to anyone who you think might benefit.

Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future (report)

Sunday, January 20th, 2008

The British Library and JISC commissioned the Centre for Information Behaviour and the Evaluation of Research (CIBER) at UCL to produce a report on Information Behaviour of the Researcher of the Future. It’s well worth reading the full reportin PDF (which I haven’t finished yet) but among the conclusions listed by the BL press release on this are:

  • All age groups revealed to share so-called ‘Google Generation’ traits
  • New study argues that libraries will have to adapt to the digital mindset
  • Young people seemingly lacking in information skills; strong message to the government and society at large

A new study overturns the common assumption that the ‘Google Generation’ – youngsters born or brought up in the Internet age – is the most web-literate. The first ever virtual longitudinal study carried out by the CIBER research team at University College London claims that, although young people demonstrate an apparent ease and familiarity with computers, they rely heavily on search engines, view rather than read and do not possess the critical and analytical skills to assess the information that they find on the web.

This is a very interesting combination of conclusions–although many of us have been observing for years that while our youngest students may think they know everything about computers they often don’t actually know the first thing about using the Internet for research (nor, needless to say, about opening up a computer–either physically or metaphorically–and playing with its innards). That the GoogleGen traits such as short attention span, impatience with anything not in the first page of search results, and readiness to flit from topic to topic in the wikiblogoatomosphere are not restricted to teenagers is not news to we “gray ADDers” either.

The suggestion that libraries, the ultimate custodians of both raw data and interpreted information (and, I would argue, especially schools and universities), need to be functioning in the spirit of this new digital world and serving the needs of our plugged-in and distracted community. Not by making information available in bite-sized, easily identified and digested pieces–that would be pandering, not serving–but by providing educational resources alongside the traditional preserved texts/media. And microformatting it (because our target-audience don’t necessarily know they’re our audience). And future-proofing it.

Learn a foreign language on the cheap

Thursday, August 16th, 2007

from Lifehacker:

The No Thick Manuals wiki details how to learn a language efficiently using two free, open source applications. The first is jVLT (java Vocabulary Learning Tool), a completely cross platform flash card application. The second is StarDict, a Windows/Linux-only dictionary that provides an impressive array of features and dictionaries. Granted, most of us would require some textbooks and/or audio supplements, but anyone learning a language needs a good dictionary and some flash cards, and these free desktop applications sound a lot simpler than making flash cards by hand and manually looking up words in your dictionary.

Top 100 Alt Search Engine list

Saturday, August 4th, 2007

I saw last year’s Top 100 posted here from Read/WriteWeb. They’ve just put out this year’s Top 100.

The author says: Some of them did not even exist a year ago. One of my goals is to show my readers the “latest and the greatest” search engine innovations. The motto for the blog [ASE], after all, is “the most wonderful search engines you’ve never seen,” and my favorite comment of all is, “Wow! I didn’t even know that most of these existed!”

These are great examples to give students in class exercises to show them that the Google way is not the only way!

ccLearn: Creative Commons education division

Saturday, July 28th, 2007

An interesting development for teaching materials and collaboration protocols:

Creative Commons is pleased to announce the launch of a new division focused on education: ccLearn.

ccLearn is dedicated to realizing the full potential of the Internet to support open learning and open educational resources (OER). Our mission is to minimize barriers to sharing and reuse of educational materials — legal barriers, technical barriers, and social barriers.

  • With legal barriers, we advocate for licensing of educational materials under interoperable terms, such as those provided by Creative Commons licenses, that allow unhampered modification, remixing, and redistribution. We also educate teachers, learners, and policy makers about copyright and fair-use issues pertaining to education.
  • With technical barriers, we promote interoperability standards and tools to facilitate remixing and reuse.
  • With social barriers, we encourage teachers and learners to re-use educational materials available on the Web, and to build on each other’s contributions.

ccLearn will be in transition over the remainder of the summer, 2007, reaching full operation this Fall. ccLearn is generously supported by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and is working closely with members of the Foundation’s Open Educational Resources Program. This is an international project, and we will be working with open educational sites and resources from around the world.