Archive for February, 2008

Registration: 3D Scanning Conference at UCL

Tuesday, February 26th, 2008

Kalliopi Vacharopoulou wrote, via the DigitalClassicist list:

I would like to draw to your attention the fact that registration for the 3D Colour Laser Scanning Conference at UCL on the 27th and 28th of March has now opened.

The first day (27th of March) will include a keynote presentation and papers on the themes of General Applications of 3D Scanning in the Museum and Heritage Sector and of 3D Scanning in Conservation.

The second day (28th of March) will offer a keynote presentation and papers on the themes of 3D Scanning in Display (and Exhibition) and Education and Interpretation. A detailed programme with the papers and the names of the speakers can be found in our website.

If you would like to attend the conference, I would kindly request to fill in the registration form which you can find in this link and return it to me as soon as possible.

There is no fee for participating (or attending the conference) (coffee and lunch are provided free of charge). Please note that attendance is offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

Please feel free to circulate the information about the conference to anyone who you think might be interested.

In the meantime, do not hesitate to contact me with any inquiries.

International Seminar of Digital Philology: Edinburgh, March 25-27, 2008

Saturday, February 23rd, 2008

Seen on the AHeSSC mailing list:

The e-Science Institute Event Announcement

The e-Science Institute is delighted to host the “The Marriage of Mercury and Philology: Problems and Outcomes in Digital Philology”. The conference welcomes both leading scholars and young researchers working on the problems of textual criticism and editorial scholarship in the electronic medium, as well as students, teachers, librarians, archivists, and computing professionals who are interested in representation, access, exchange, management and conservation of texts.

Organiser: Cinzia Pusceddu
Dates and Time: Tuesday 25th March 09.00 – Thursday 27th March 17.00
Place: e-Science Institute
University of Edinburgh
13-15 South College Street
Edinburgh
EH8 9AA

For registration and more details see http://www.nesc.ac.uk/esi/events/854/.

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Palaeographic Image Markup Tools

Tuesday, February 19th, 2008
Does anyone know of any prior work in the area of image markup tools, to enable scholars to markup letterforms (and their constituent strokes) on images of texts?
There is the UVic Image Markup tool:
http://www.tapor.uvic.ca/~mholmes/image_markup/index.php
and the Edition Production and PresentantionTechnology tool:
http://mustard.tapor.uvic.ca/cocoon/ach_abstracts/xq/xhtml.xq?id=176
Dot Porter did a good roundup of the various work going on in this area here: http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dh2007/abstracts/xhtml.xq?id=250
which also points to Digital Incunabula:
http://katoptron.holycross.edu/cocoon/diginc/home and juxta: http://www.nines.org/tools/juxta.html
as more simple tools to link images and text.
Is there is anyone out there on Stoa using an image markup tool (other than PhotoShop) to trace letter forms over images of text? Any good tools out there that we should know about?

Search Pigeon

Monday, February 18th, 2008

Spotted by way of Peter Suber’s Open Access News:

Search Pigeon is a collection of Google Co-opTM Custom Search Engines (CSEs) designed to make researching on the web a richer, more rewarding, and more efficient process.

Designed for researchers in the Arts and Humanities, with a decidedly interdisciplinary bent, the objective of Search Pigeon is to provide a tool enabling the productive and trustworthy garnering of scholarly articles through customized searching.

Right now SearchPigeon.org provides CSEs that search hundreds of peer-reviewed and open access online journals, provided they are either English-language journals, or provide a translation of their site into English.

Post-doctoral positions and PhD fellowships

Monday, February 18th, 2008

Seen and copied from Humanist:

Post-doctoral positions and PhD fellowships in Text
Classification and Automatic Labelling

The Department of Computer Science at Trinity College Dublin is
looking for applications for ONE Postdoctoral positions and TWO PhD
positions in the areas of text classification and automatic labelling
of text streams.

The positions are part of a large research project “Next Generation
Localisation” involving a consortium of leading Irish Universities
(DCU, TCD, UCD and UL) and Industry Partners, funded by the Science
Foundation Ireland (SFI). The project focuses on Language Technology
and Digital Content Management in Localisation. Localisation is the
industrial-scale adaptation of digital content to domain, culture and
language. Successful candidates will join a team of Postdoctoral
researchers, PhD students and research advisors from academia and
industry. Details of the advertised posts are as follows:

– POSTDOCSF32: Postdoctoral Position in “Text Categorisation”

o Description: The successful candidate will research and develop
algorithms for automatic annotation of localisation metadata, and
multilingual text type and genre classification. Candidates must
have a strong background and research record in machine learning
and data-intensive natural language processing, as well as good
programming skills.

o Starting date: 3rd quarter 2008

o Salary: Approx. 38,000-44,000 Euro per annum depending on
experience and qualifications.

For further details, please contact Dr Saturnino Luz
(luzs@cs.tcd.ie) or Dr Carl Vogel (vogel@cs.tcd.ie). To apply,
please email a CV and contact details for two references by March 1,
2008 to Jean.Maypother@cs.tcd.ie. Please include the job reference
(“POSTDOCILT32″) in the subject line of all email correspondence.

————————

– PHDILT33: PhD Fellowship in “Multilingual Text Type and Genre
Classification”

o Description: Candidates must have a strong interest and some
experience in Computational Linguistics and Machine Learning, and
good programming skills.  Experience with syntactic, semantic
and discourse analysis is desirable.

o Starting date: September 2008

o Stipend: Approx. 16,000 Euro per annum (tax exempt) + University
fees (approx. 5,000 Euro per annum) + equipment allowance and a
generous conference travel allowance.

For further details, please contact Dr Carl Vogel
(vogel@cs.tcd.ie). To apply, please email a CV and contact
details for two references by March 1, 2008 to
Jean.Maypother@cs.tcd.ie. Please include the job reference
(“PHDILT33″) in the subject line of all email correspondence.

————————

– PHDILT32: PhD Fellowship in “Automatic Annotation of
Localisation
Metadata”

o Description: Candidates must have a strong interest and
some
experience in Computational Linguistics or Machine Learning,
and
good programming skills.

o Starting date: September
2008

o Stipend: Approx. 16,000 Euro per annum (tax exempt) + University
fees (approx. 5,000 Euro per annum) + equipment allowance and a
generous conference travel
allowance.

For further details, please contact Dr Saturnino Luz
(luzs@cs.tcd.ie). To apply, please email a CV and contact
details for two references by March 1, 2008 to
Jean.Maypother@cs.tcd.ie. Please include the job reference
(“PHDILT32″) in the subject line of all email correspondence.

While the deadline is March 1, 2008, applications will be
considered until the position is filled.

Digitizing Early Material Culture (CFP)

Thursday, February 14th, 2008

Posted for Brent Nelson:

Digitizing Early Material Culture: from Antiquity to Modernity
A Seminar to be held in conjunction with
CaSTA (the Canadian Symposium on Text Analysis) 2008:
New Directions in Text Analysis
A Joint Humanities Computing, Computer Science Seminar and Conference at University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, 16-18 October 2008
“Digitizing Early Material Culture: from Antiquity to Modernity” seminar will be held at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon 16 October 2008 and will feature guest speakers:

  • Melissa Terras, Lecturer in Electronic Communications in the School of Library, Archive and Information Studies at University College London
  • Lisa Snyder, Associate Director of the Experiential Technologies Centre, University of California Los Angeles

It will be held in conjunction with CaSTA 2008–“New Directions in Text Analysis,” 17-18 August, featuring guest speakers:

  • David Hoover, Professor of English at New York University (keynote)
  • Hoyt Duggan, Professor Emeritus in English at University of Virginia
  • Geoffrey Rockwell, Associate Professor in Humanities Computing at University of Alberta
  • Cara Leitch, PhD candidate in English at University of Victoria

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Music in TEI SIG

Sunday, February 10th, 2008

The TEI community have just set up a Special Interest Group for the encoding of music in XML (disclosure: I am one of the moderators). I forward the announcement below:

A Special Interest Group for music encoding in TEI has been created. The goal of the SIG is to examine the current possibilities for encoding both the physical representation of music and the aural common elements between different notation systems, and to decide on a preliminary recommendation/agenda for music encoding in the TEI, whether directly via adoption of new elements or by importing a recommended namespace from an existing external schema.

The discussion will deal with issues like:

  • Encoding western music notation from all time periods, from ancient through modern.
  • Encoding not only the music notation, but the aural aspects common to different notation systems.
  • Encoding music and text together as well as music on its own.

Everyone interested is welcome to participate to our mailing list:
http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/cgi-bin/wa?A0=TEI-MUSIC-SIG
and to our wiki:
http://www.tei-c.org/wiki/index.php/SIG:Music

It is particularly important, I think, that experts in ancient music are represented in this discussion, since many of the participants in the TEI community are mediaeval or modern manuscript scholars. There may (there surely *will*) be features of ancient music that test the limits of standards designed to encode more modern musical notations.

(Does anyone have any nice musical papyri lying around that we could encode in EpiDoc as a test of this sort of markup?)