Archive for August, 2008

Open Access Day Announced: 14 October 2008

Friday, August 29th, 2008

By way of Open Access News we learn of the announcement of Open Access Day 2008:

SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), the Public Library of Science (PLoS), and Students for Free Culture have jointly announced the first international Open Access Day. Building on the worldwide momentum toward Open Access to publicly funded research, Open Access Day will create a key opportunity for the higher education community and the general public to understand more clearly the opportunities of wider access and use of content.

Open Access Day will invite researchers, educators, librarians, students, and the public to participate in live, worldwide broadcasts of events.

Contribute to the Greek and Latin Treebanks at Perseus!

Thursday, August 28th, 2008

Posted on behalf of Greg Crane. Link to the Treebank, which provides more information, at the very end of the post.

We are currently looking for advanced students of Greek and Latin to contribute syntactic analyses (via a web-based system) to our existing Latin Treebank (described below) and our emerging Greek Treebank as well (for which we have just received funding). We particularly encourage students at various levels to design research projects around this new tool. We are looking in particular for the following:

  • Get paid to read Greek! We can have a limited number of research assistantships for advanced students of the languages who can work for the project from their home institutions. We particularly encourage students who can use the analyses that they produce to support research projects of their own.
  • We also encourage classes of Greek and Latin to contribute as well. Creating the syntactic analyses provides a new way to address the traditional task of parsing Greek and Latin. Your class work can then contribute to a foundational new resource for the study of Greek and Latin – both courses as a whole and individual contributors are acknowledged in the published data.
  • Students and faculty interested in conducting their own original research based on treebank data will have the option to submit their work for editorial review to have it published as part of the emerging Scaife Digital Library.

To contribute, please contact David Bamman (david.bamman@tufts.edu) or Gregory Crane (gregory.crane@tufts.edu).

http://nlp.perseus.tufts.edu/syntax/treebank/

Office of Digital Humanities: Search for funded projects

Wednesday, August 20th, 2008

Playing around on the website of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Office of Digital Humanities this afternoon I came across the Library of Funded Projects, a database of projects funded through the ODH. Visitors can search by Categories (technical focus of the projects, not subject), Grant Programs, or by keyword. Project records include most information one would want including PI, award dates, funding, abstract, link to project website (when one exists), and a space to link project white papers (which are required at the conclusion of all ODH-funded projects).

The LFP is not up-to-date; searches for several of the grant programs come up empty (including those where there are currently funded projects). Even so, this could be an immensely valuable resource to help scholars keep abreast of new work being done in the field, especially the smaller projects supported through the Start-Up program.

(The keyword search, as most keyword searches, needs some working with. “Classics” turns up nothing, while “classical” and “ancient” pull up two different but slightly overlapping lists.)

UPDATE: Are there similar libraries/databases for other national funding agencies (DFG, JISC, etc.)? If so, please cite them in the comments. Thanks!

How to cite Creative Commons works

Saturday, August 16th, 2008

A very useful guide is being compiled by Molly Kleinman in her Multi-Purpose Librarian blog. As someone who licenses a lot of work using CC-BY, and who both re-uses and sometimes re-mixes a lot of CC work (especially photographs) for both academic and creative ends, I recognise that it isn’t always clear exactly what “attribution” means, for example. Kleinman gives examples of ideal and realistic usage (the real name of a copyright-holder and/or title of a work may not always been known, say), and makes suggestions for good practice and compromises. This is a very welcome service, and I hope that more examples and comments follow.