Archive for December, 2008

Ph.D. fellowships in digital curation

Tuesday, December 30th, 2008

The School of Information and Library Science (www.sils.unc.edu) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill encourages applications for Ph.D. fellowships in digital curation supported by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded  DigCCurrII project (http://ils.unc.edu/digccurr/aboutII.html#cdcdf).

DigCCurr II seeks to develop an international, doctoral-level curriculum and educational network in the management and preservation of digital materials across their life cycle. This project will prepare future faculty to perform research and teach in this area, as well as provide summer institutes for cultural heritage information professionals already working in this arena.

What the Fellowship Offers

  • A 20 hr/wk position as a Research Fellow for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded project, “DigCCurr II: Extending an International Digital Curation Curriculum to Doctoral Students and Practitioners.”
  • A stipend of $19,000 for three years
  • In-state tuition and health coverage
  • Annual enrichment funds of $800
  • Extensive opportunities to meet key leaders in the Digital Curation research and practice arenas through workshops and symposia to be held at UNC

Applying for the Fellowship

To apply for the fellowship, please follow the regular application procedures found on the SILS Ph.D. Admissions page. The deadline to apply for the Carolina Digital Curation Doctoral Fellowships (CDCDF) program is February 15, 2009; however, earlier applications are encouraged. In addition to the required written statement of your intended research focus, we ask that you write a separate essay elaborating on these goals and how they are related to the goals of DigCCurr II. Please send this essay in an email to Dr. Helen Tibbo at tibbo (at) email.unc.edu, Dr. Cal Lee at callee (at) email.unc.edu, or Heather Bowden at hbowden (at) email.unc.edu, no later than February 15, 2009. Earlier applications are encouraged. Please note that we are only able to accept applications from United States Citizens at this time.

For more information on Carolina Digital Curation Doctoral Fellowship opportunities, send e-mail to Dr. Helen Tibbo at tibbo (at) email.unc.edu, Dr. Cal Lee at callee (at) email.unc.edu, or Heather Bowden at hbowden (at) email.unc.edu.

Interested applicants may also direct correspondence to:

DigCCurr II Fellowships
School of Information and Library Science
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Campus Box 3360 Manning Hall
Chapel Hill NC 27566-3360

NEH High Performance Computing Awards

Thursday, December 4th, 2008

Winners of the National Endowment for the Humanities/Department of Energy Humanities High Performance Computing program were reported on Arts-Humanities.Net by Brett Bobbley (originally at the ODH site). I note that two of the three awards have a strong classical connection:

** The Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University for its project Large-Scale Learning and the Automatic Analysis of Historical Texts. The Perseus project will be using advanced computational linguistic technologies to experiment with the analysis of ancient texts for the study of classics and other fields.

The Perseus Project has been a stellar classical resource for many years now, and has been at the forefront of applying cyberinfrastructure and large-scale computing resources to Greek and Latin.

** The Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities at the University of Virginia for its project High Performance Computing for Processing and Analysis of Digitized 3-D Models of Cultural Heritage. IATH will process previously-acquired raw datasets of culturally valuable objects such as artistic statuary, archaeological artifacts, and historical architecture in order to create highly accurate 3-D models for the study of art and architecture.

IATH have also been doing exciting work in Digital Classics, in particular the Rome Reborn project that is now integrated into Google Earth.

Is it just me, or are Digital Classicists getting a good slice of the DH pie these days? (Two out of three joint JISC/NEH awards last year were Classical too.)