Archive for February, 2009

New Digital Humanities/Libraries/Museums Calendar

Friday, February 27th, 2009

Amanda French has started a publicly accessible calendar of conferences and events related to “Digital Humanities, Digital Libraries and Digital Museums.”

Special issue of the DHQ in honour of Ross Scaife

Friday, February 27th, 2009

copied from Humanist:

From: Julia Flanders
Subject: DHQ issue 3.1 now available
We’re very happy to announce the publication of the new issue of DHQ:

DHQ 3.1 (Winter 2009)
A special issue in honor of Ross Scaife: “Changing the Center of
Gravity: Transforming Classical Studies Through Cyberinfrastructure”
Guest editors: Melissa Terras and Gregory Crane
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements and Dedications
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Brent Seales, University of
Kentucky; Melissa Terras, University College London

Ross Scaife (1960-2008)
Dot Porter, Digital Humanities Observatory

Cyberinfrastructure for Classical Philology
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Brent Seales, University of
Kentucky; Melissa Terras, University College London

Technology, Collaboration, and Undergraduate Research
Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Thomas R. Martin, College
of the Holy Cross

Tachypaedia Byzantina: The Suda On Line as Collaborative Encyclopedia
Anne Mahoney, Tufts University

Exploring Historical RDF with Heml
Bruce Robertson, Mount Allison University

Digitizing Latin Incunabula: Challenges, Methods, and Possibilities
Jeffrey A. Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri-Kansas City

Citation in Classical Studies
Neel Smith, College of the Holy Cross

Digital Criticism: Editorial Standards for the Homer Multitext
Casey Dué, University of Houston, Texas; Mary Ebbott, College of the
Holy Cross

Epigraphy in 2017
Hugh Cayless, University of North Carolina; Charlotte Roueché, King’s
College London; Tom Elliott, New York University; Gabriel Bodard,
King’s College London

Digital Geography and Classics
Tom Elliott, New York University; Sean Gillies, New York University

What Your Teacher Told You is True: Latin Verbs Have Four Principal
Parts
Raphael Finkel, University of Kentucky; Gregory Stump, University of
Kentucky

Computational Linguistics and Classical Lexicography
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; David Bamman, Tufts University

Classics in the Million Book Library
Gregory Crane, Tufts University; Alison Babeu, Tufts University;
David Bamman, Tufts University; Thomas Breuel, Technical University of
Kaiserslautern; Lisa Cerrato, Tufts University; Daniel Deckers,
Hamburg University; Anke Lüdeling, Humboldt-University, Berlin; David
Mimno, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Rashmi Singhal, Tufts
University; David A. Smith, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Amir
Zeldes, Humboldt-University, Berlin

Conclusion: Cyberinfrastructure, the Scaife Digital Library and
Classics in a Digital age
Christopher Blackwell, Furman University; Gregory Crane, Tufts
University

Best wishes from the DHQ editorial team

Metadata Workshops in Michigan, 7 May 2009

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

Aimed at Medievalists but may also be of interest to Classicists…

The Medieval Academy of America’s Committee on Electronic Resources is pleased to announce two workshops to be held at the International Medieval Congress, Kalamazoo, MI, in May 2009. Both workshops will be on Thursday, May 7 (sessions 54 and 166; see http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/sessions.html for complete conference schedule).

Workshop registration online at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d

1) Metadata for Medievalists I: Introduction to Metadata Formats
Session 54, Thursday 7 May, 10am

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, led by Sheila Bair, Western Michigan University’s Metadata Librarian. Instruction includes an introduction to the concept of metadata, an overview of metadata types of interest to medievalists working in a variety of textual and image formats, and an overview of methods for metadata implementations (database, encoded data, printed copy, etc.). Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

2) Metadata for Medievalists II: Introduction to the Text-Encoding Initiative
Session 166, Thursday 7 May, 3:30pm

This workshop offers an introduction to best practices for digital scholarship, taught by a medievalist, Dot Porter, specifically for medievalists. Instruction includes introductory-level XML and structural encoding, as well as TEI P5 standards and guidelines, markup concerns for medieval transcription, and a brief consideration of XML Editors. Assignments will be completed during the following clinic.

Sheila Bair is the Metadata Librarian at Western Michigan University and holds an MS in Library Science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dot Porter is the Metadata Manager at the Digital Humanities Observatory, Royal Irish Academy, in Dublin, Ireland. She has an MA in Medieval Studies from Western Michigan University and an MS in Library Science from UNC Chapel Hill, and extensive experience in text encoding in the medieval studies and classics.

Both workshops are limited to 35 participants, and registration is required.

The pre-registration fee per workshop for students is $40/$55 (Medieval Academy members/nonmembers), for non-students is $50/$65.

To register, complete the online form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=r0MHrirO9JMJU_2f_2fB69d8Wg_3d_3d
Questions about registration should be directed to James W. Brodman at jimb[at]uca.edu
Questions about the workshops should be directed to Dot Porter at dot.porter[at]gmail.com

NEH Program Officer jobs

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

The National Endowment for the Humanities is hiring: two “humanities administrator” positions (aka program officers), and one accountant. Better hurry:   one of them closes this Friday.

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Wednesday, February 4th, 2009

Digital Classicist Work-in-Progress Seminars (London, 2009)

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of Work-in-Progress seminars in Summer 2009, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that involves equal collaboration with a computer scientist or that would be considered serious research in the Computing field as well as Classics, Archaeology, and/or Ancient History.

The Work-in-Progress seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London, and are sponsored by the Institute for Classical Studies (UofL), the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (KCL), the Centre for e-Research (KCL), and the British Library. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2009. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Best regards,

Gabriel Bodard (CCH)
Stuart Dunn (CeRch)
Juan Garcés (BL)
Simon Mahony (CCH)