Archive for December, 2009

Give a Humanist a Supercomputer…

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

The “Wired Campus” section of the Chronicle of Higher Education is reporting on the uses that humanities scholars have found for the U.S. Department of Energy’s High Performance Computing resources.  The short article reports on the efforts of several people who have made use of the resources, including Gregory Crane of the Perseus Project, David Bamman, a computational linguist who has been mining data from classical texts, and David Koller, a researcher with the Digital Sculpture Project, which has developed ways to coalesce numerous images of an object into a high-resolution 3D image.  The article reports that, according to Mr. Koller, intermediaries are needed who can help humanities and computer researchers communicate with each other.

PhD in Digital Humanities

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

The Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH) at King’s College London offers a doctoral programme leading to the degree of PhD in Digital Humanities. Typically the degree involves a joint arrangement between CCH and another department in the School of Arts and Humanities at King’s, on occasion involving the School of Social Science and Public Policy. Some students are also jointly in the Centre for Language, Discourse and Communication (LDC), which is our cross-disciplinary home for linguistics.

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2010 DHO Summer School with NINES and EpiDoc

Monday, December 7th, 2009

2010 DHO Summer School
in conjunction with NINES and the EpiDoc Collaborative

28 June – 2 July, 2010
http://dho.ie/ss2010

The third annual Digital Humanities Observatory (DHO) Summer School will take place in Dublin from 28 June to 2 July 2010. Following the highly successful 2009 Summer School, next year’s event will see the expansion of popular workshop strands such as:
  • A Practical Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative
  • Data Visualisation for the Humanities
  • An Introduction to EpiDoc Markup and Editing Tools
  • The One to Many Text: Text Transformations with XSLT

The Summer School will feature lectures by Dr. Hugh Denard (King’s College London Visualisation Lab) and Dr Ian Gregory (University of Lancaster). Workshop facilitators include Dr Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London), Dr James Cowey (University of Heidelberg), Professor Laura Mandell (Miami University of Ohio), Dr Susan Schreibman (Digital Humanities Observatory), Justin Tonra (NUI, Galway) and Dana Wheeles (University of Virginia).

Major workshop strands will be conducted over four days allowing delegates to choose a mini-workshop on Wednesday from one of the following offerings:

  • Geospatial Methods for Humanities Research
  • Using Digital Resources for Irish Research and Teaching
  • Visualising Space, Time and Events: Using Virtual Worlds for Humanities Research
  • Finding the Concepts In the Chaos – Building Relationships With Data Models
  • Planning Digital Scholarly Resources: A Primer

The introduction of the one-day mini-workshops allows people to choose to attend a single-day event only at a reduced cost.

Ruins of Pompeii now in Google Street View

Friday, December 4th, 2009

The title says it all.  Check it out here.

New Blog: “Fragmentary Texts”

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

An announcement posted on behalf of Monica Berti:

I write to signal a new blog called “Fragmentary Texts”:
http://www.fragmentarytexts.org/
“Fragmentary Texts” is a blog edited by Monica Berti and devoted to models and methodologies for collecting and representing Greek and Latin texts of classical antiquity that have been preserved in fragments. By “fragments” we mean both physical fragments – as, for example, fragments of architectural elements, scraps of papyri, or broken inscriptions – and indirect fragments, i.e. quotations by surviving authors, who quote, paraphrase, summarize or allude to authors and works that have not survived. This blog gives particular attention to the category of “indirect fragments”, discussing its meaning and the complexitiy of the reconstruction of the relationship between a textual fragment and its source of transmission. The main goal of this blog is to discuss models and tools for representing fragmentary texts in a digital library, building a collaborative environment for scholars and enthusiasts who are interested in the topic.