Archive for January, 2010

Relationships Between Classics and Museums (Cambridge)

Friday, January 29th, 2010

(While this is not strictly a digital Classics series, the interdisciplinary questions and issues of cultural heritage and curation being discussed ought to be of interest to Stoa readers. If anyone is attending these seminars we would be delighted to post short reports or reactions here.)

Two worlds colliding?: the relationships between Classics and Museums
organised by Dr Kate Cooper, Fitzwilliam Museum

Tuesdays at 4.30pm Room 1.04 Faculty of Classics (Sidgwick Site), Cambridge. All Welcome.

26th January Professor Robin Cormack (Courtauld Institute of Art & Faculty of Classics, Cambridge)
Perspectives from the outside: curating temporary loan exhibitions at the Royal Academy and elsewhere.

2nd February Dr Susan Walker (Keeper of Antiquities, Ashmolean Museum)
Change and flow: the new Ashmolean

9th February Dr Lucilla Burn (Keeper of Antiquities, Fitzwilliam Museum)
How do the Greek and Roman collections of the Fitzwilliam Museum and their display relate to the study of Classics?

16th February Dr Andrew Burnett (Deputy Director, The British Museum)
International issues and museums today

23rd February Dr Roger Bland (Head of the Department of Portable Antiquities and Treasure, The British Museum)
A license to loot or archaeological rescue? The Portable Antiquities Scheme in England and Wales

2nd March Dr Timothy Potts (Director, The Fitzwilliam Museum)
Museums and the preservation of archaeological heritage: past practice and future prospects

Project Research Associates at CCH

Friday, January 29th, 2010

Job posting: three Project Research Associates required

The Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King’s College London is looking for three highly motivated and technically sophisticated individuals to work on its text-based research projects. The positions will involve using computer tools and methods to facilitate digital scholarship.

CCH is both a department with responsibility for its own academic programme and a research centre promoting the appropriate application of computing in humanities research. Its research projects cover a wide range of humanities disciplines, including medieval studies, history, literature and linguistics, and music, and also include a number of more general information management projects in both humanities and the social sciences.

The successful candidates will possess strong analytical and problem solving skills: they will be required to identify and engage with the core scholarly questions in a highly collaborative research context; to analyse a wide variety of humanities materials and to model them using XML-related technologies; to design and develop systems for editing and delivering text-based scholarly materials and to collaborate in the design of integrated HTML-based publication. Experience in creating and manipulating XML documents in a range of XML-related standards and technologies (DTDs, XPath, XSLT) is highly desirable, in particular textual materials encoded according to the Text Encoding Initiative’s guidelines.

All successful candidates will need to have a good understanding of how research is conducted in the humanities and social sciences and will be expected to make a strong contribution to the departmental research profile. They will need to be able to work effectively as part of a team, as well as independently. They must have good communication skills and the ability to document their work in clear written English.

One position is for one year on Fixed Term Contract (Maternity Cover) – within the Grade 5 scale, currently £28,074 to £32,176, inclusive of London Allowance.

Two positions are for one year on Fixed Term Contract – within the Grade 6 scale, currently £30,070 to £39,038 per annum, inclusive of London Allowance.

Closing date: 12th February 2010

Please view and apply for positions at the following pages:

Digital Research and Collaborative Work (APA panel)

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

There was a lot of talk of Digital Humanities at the MLA last week; as Hugh pointed out, though, there seems to be only one explicitly digital panel at our subject meeting, the APA/AIA in Anaheim. However, it should be a good one, and I’d encourage anyone with digital or collaborative interests to make sure and attend. The below is taken from the APA programme, annotated by me:

SECTION 28
Digital Research and Developments in Collaborative Work in Classics
FRIDAY January 8, 11:15 A.M. – 1:15 P.M. Elite Ballroom 3
Gabriel Bodard and Alex Lee, Organizers

The papers in this panel concern themselves with the implications of digital editing on the research process. ‘Editing’ in this context includes the collection, research, sharing, and preparation for publication of textual, historical, or archaeological material. The digital work, which is often seen as a tool en route to creating an online publication, also transforms the editor’s research—both in terms of the speed and the sequence with which we can perform certain tasks, and of the different and new sorts of questions that the data throws up
for us to consider.

1. Valentina Asciutti & Stuart Dunn, King’s College London
Mapping Evidence for Roman Regionalism and Regional Literacy in Roman Britain from the Inscribed and Illustrated Objects (20 mins.)
*Read by Sebastian Heath*

2. Gabriel Bodard & Irene Polinskaya, King’s College London
A Digital Edition of IOSPE: Collaboration and Interoperability Enabled by e-Science Methods (20 mins.)
*Read by Tom Elliott*

3. Alex Lee, University of Chicago
Scholarly Editing in the Digital Age: the Archimedes Palimpsest as a Case Study (20 mins.)

Although two of the three papers will be read by someone other than their authors, the readers are themselves experts in closely related areas, and Alex, Tom and Sebastian (and other expert attendees, to be announced) will be conducting a round table discussion on the subject of digital research and collaboration for the remaining time of the session.

More spacial analysis…

Monday, January 4th, 2010

While on the subject of spacial analysis, I’m sure there are archaeologists and geographers here who would have useful suggestions for what we can do with the hi-res 3-D images of the Earth that the NASA SRTM project has made available. There’s a nice overview of the imagery and some of the uses to which it’s already been put in this post, “Reading the world in Braille” at Integrity-Logic (coincidence that it’s International Braille Day today?).

So we’ve discussed what to do with a million books; now what do we do with quadrillions of bytes of geodata? Answers on the back of a postcard (or in a comment) please.

Spacial Analysis in Archaeology (seminars)

Monday, January 4th, 2010

Contemporary Roles for Spatial Analysis in Archaeology

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Seminar Series (January–March 2010)
31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
Mondays 4pm, Room 612 (followed by a wine reception)

Timetable

11 January 2010 – Benjamin Ducke (Oxford Archaeology)
‘Science without software no longer. Archaeological data analysis and the Open Source paradigm’

18 January 2010 – Chris Green (University of Leicester)
‘Temporal GIS and archaeology’

25 January 2010 – Tony Wilkinson (Durham University)
‘From household to region: incorporating agency into the interpretation of regional settlement’

1 February 2010 – Tim Williams (University College London)
‘Earth viewers and GIS in archaeological resource management: access and accessibility’

8 February 2010 – Luke Premo (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary
Anthropology)
‘A spatially explicit model of Early Stone Age archaeological landscapes’

15 February 2010 (Reading Week – no seminar)

22 February 2010 – Frederic Fol Leymarie (Goldsmiths College)
‘Advances in 3D procedural modelling with applications to archaeology’

1 March 2010 – Michael Barton (Arizona State University)
‘Stories of the past or science of the future? Archaeology and computational social science’

8 March 2010 – Irmela Herzog (Archaeological Heritage Management of the Rhineland)
‘Patterns of movement, least cost paths and our understanding of the archaeological record’

15 March 2010 – Kate Devlin (Goldsmiths College)
‘Illuminating virtual reconstructions of past environments’

22 March 2010 – Mark Lake (University College London)
‘Rewind and fast‐forward: how archaeological GIS analyses recapitulate general theory’