Archive for February, 2010

How to Cite e-Resources without Stable URLs

Friday, February 26th, 2010

It used to be said, especially by the Internet’s nay-sayers, that the insuperable barrier to publishing and citing online is that links are never stable. The number of pages that appear and disappear every day means that even a year-old list of sites is likely to contain significant link rot. There is a significant movement to promote both stable and cool URLs (see for example [van Kesteren 2004] and [Berners-Lee 1998]), and most of those of us who publish online take great pains to have URLs that are both predictable and will not need to change.

For example, we recently published The Inscritions of Roman Tripolitania, a digital edition based very closely on the 1952 printed volume by Reynolds and Ward-Perkins, at:

Because this is largely a reprint, there is obviously more work to be done, and we hope to add a new edition fairly soon (incorporating, for example, Arabic translation and new digital photographs). When we do so, the new site will be labeled “irt2011″ or similar, all internal links will include this date, and the old site will not need to be removed or renamed. No links will be broken in this process.

Similarly, good electronic journals have URLs that reflect date and/or issue number in the directory structure:

Again we can see that they don’t need to change when new issues come along or the site is restructured. Additionally, you can guess from these URLs what the address of DM issue 5, or DHQ issue 4.2, would be. Additionally, I can remember (or guess) the URLs of individual papers within DM by their authors’ surnames. I strongly suspect that in a year and in ten years, these URLs will still work.

All of which makes is especially surprising that an institution like the Center for Hellenic Studies, which is in so many ways a field-leader and standard-setter in Digital Humanities matters, has a website whose URLs seem to be generated by a content management system. These URLs (including that of their flagship online journal Classics@, and of the magisterial Homer Multitext) are ungainly, arbitrary, and almost certainly not stable. Even worse, many individual pages within the site have URLs that contain a session-specific hash, and so cannot be cited at all:

One might argue that these pages should be cited as if they were paper publications, and readers are then left to their own devices to track them down, but surely that isn’t good enough? Are there any solutions to citing electronically, and linking to, a page whose URL is likely to be itinerant? A persistent redirect? A Zotero biblio URL that you can update if you notice it’s broken?

III Incontro di Filologia Digitale (Verona, March 3-5)

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

Posted for Roberto Rosselli del Turco:

III Incontro di Filologia Digitale – Verona 3-5 marzo 2010
Sala Conferenze
Banco Popolare di Verona
Via san Cosimo, 10 Verona

Conference Programme

Mercoledì 3 marzo 2010

14.30 Saluti delle Autorità
15.00 Apertura dei lavori

15.00-15.45 Federico Giusfredi / Alfredo Rizza (Hethitisches Wörterbuch, Institut für Assyriologie und Hethitologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Dep. of Linguistics, UCB, Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholar)
Zipf’s Law and the Distribution of Signs

15.45-16.30 Manuela Anelli / Marta Muscariello / Giulia Sarullo (Istituto di Scienze dell’Uomo, del Linguaggio e dell’Ambiente, Libera Università di Lingue e Comunicazione IULM, Milano)
The Digital Edition of Epigraphic Texts as Research Tool: the ILA Project

16.30-17.15 Margherita Farina (Dipartimento di Scienze Storiche del Mondo Antico, Università di Pisa)
Electronic analysis and organization of the Syro-Turkic Inscriptions of China and Central Asia (more…)

Virtual museum guide

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics Research have developed a computer system to recognize images in a museum and enhance them with digital information, and have deployed such a system in Amsterdam’s Allard Pierson Museum.  When visitors point a flat-screen computer’s digital camera at an image in the exhibition (for example, an image of the Roman Forum, the Temple of Saturn, or the Colosseum), the system overlays the scene with ancillary information, including a possible reconstruction of ruins.   Such a technology is called “augmented reality,” and it may become available to tourists via smart phones.

Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

Posting this on behalf of the organisers.

Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage: Technological Challenges and Solutions

The Academy of Finland research unit ‘Ancient Greek written sources’ (CoE) is organizing a symposium “Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage: Technological Challenges and Solutions”. The symposium takes place on 28-29 October, 2010, in Helsinki, Finland.

The programme comprises of two plenary sessions that are open for public, two workshops that are intended for the speakers only, and one open session on end-user perspective.

Participation in the symposium is free of charge (however, registration is compulsory). For the accepted speakers the CoE will be covering the travel and accommodation costs.

We would be grateful if the following short ad could be included in the web site of Digital Classicist to promote our symposium.

Maarit Kinnunen
tel. + 358 50 577 9153
maarit.kinnunen@expericon.fi

============================================

Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage: Technological Challenges and Solutions 28-29 October 2010 in Helsinki, Finland.
Organizer: The Academy of Finland Research Unit “Ancient Greek written sources” (CoE)
Partner: The National Library of Finland
For more information, see www.eikonopoiia.org

DHO Summer School: EpiDoc

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

The DHO Summer School is now open for registration. The School will be held at the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin. EpiDoc is being offered as a course:

2010 DHO Summer School – Registration Now Open

www.dho.ie/ss2010

The DHO is pleased to announce that registration for the 2010 DHO Summer School, in conjunction with NINEs and the EpiDoc Collaborative, is now open.

The Summer School welcomes registrants from the various fields of the humanities, information studies, and computer science. Workshops and lectures cover subjects as diverse as text encoding, virtual worlds, and geospatial methods for the humanities. These are facilitated by leading experts, with plenty of time during evening activities for informal interaction.

This year, in addition to four-day workshop strands, the DHO is also offering mid-week, one-day workshops. For those unable to attend the entire Summer School, it is possible to register separately for these mid-week workshops and lectures.

As in previous years, the Summer School brings together Irish and International scholars undertaking digital projects in diverse areas to explore issues and trends of common interest. The programme will offer attendees opportunities to develop their skills, share insights, and discover new opportunities for collaboration and research. Activities focus on the theoretical, technical, administrative, and institutional issues relevant to the needs of digital humanities projects today.

The pricing for the full Summer School, as well as one-day workshops and lectures, is available on the registration page: http://dho.ie/ss2010/registration

Full details of the workshop strands, lectures and guest speakers can be found on the Summer School website at: www.dho.ie/ss2010

We look forward to seeing you in Dublin.

Digital Classicist 2010 Seminars CFP

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

Call for Presentations

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, with support from the British Library, in Summer 2010 on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. We are especially interested in work that demonstrates interdisciplinarity or work on the intersections between Ancient History, Classics or Archaeology and a digital, technical or practice-based discipline.

The Digital Classicist seminars run on Friday afternoons from June to August in Senate House, London. In previous years collected papers from the DC WiP seminars have been published(*) in a special issue of an online journal (2006), edited as a printed volume (2007), and released as audio podcasts (2008-9); we anticipate similar publication opportunities for future series. A small budget is available to help with travel costs.

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk by March 31st 2010. We shall announce the full programme in April.

Regards,

The organizers

Gabriel Bodard, King’s College London
Stuart Dunn, King’s College London
Juan Garcés, Greek Manuscripts Department, British Library
Simon Mahony, University College London
Melissa Terras, University College London

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