Archive for January, 2012

Digital Classicist London 2012: Call for Papers

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

The annual Digital Classicist London seminar series on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component will run again in Summer 2012.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, linguistics technology, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information scientists or digital humanists, and have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

The seminars will run on Friday afternoons (16:30-18:00) from June to mid-July in Senate House, London, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (ending early this year to avoid clashing with the Olympic Games). In previous years collected papers from the seminars have been published in a special issue of Digital Medievalist; a printed volume from Ashgate Press; a BICS supplement (in production). The last few years’ papers have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

To submit a paper for consideration for the Digital Classicist London Seminars, please email an abstract of 300-500 words to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk, by midnight UTC on April 8th, 2012.

More information will be found at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2012.html

Guide to Evagrius Ponticus

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

This just in from Joel Kalvesmaki:

I am pleased to announce the appearance of the Guide to Evagrius Ponticus, a digital-only, peer-reviewed reference work about the fourth-century monastic theologian. Updated quarterly, it provides definitive, integrated lists of Evagrius’s works, of editions and translations of those works, and of studies related to his life and thought. The Guide also includes a sourcebook of key ancient testimonies to Evagrius and his reception, in English translation, as well as a checklist of images from the ancient world.

The Guide takes relatively new approaches to open-access academic publishing in the digital humanities [ed: cc-nc-sa], and so is anticipated to develop over the coming years. Future editions will include a manuscript checklist, images of manuscripts, transcriptions of those manuscripts, and open-source critical editions of Evagrius’s writings.

http://evagriusponticus.net/

(For a more complete experience, read the Guide on a browser other than Internet Explorer.)

Linked Ancient World Data Institute at NYU (Spring 2012)

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) will host the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) from May 31st to June 2nd, 2012 in New York City. “Linked Open Data” is an approach to the creation of digital resources that emphasizes connections between diverse information on the basis of published and stable web addresses (URIs) that identify common concepts and individual items. LAWDI, funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for Humanities, will bring together an international faculty of practitioners working in the field of Linked Data with twenty attendees who are implementing or planning the creation of digital resources.

More information, including a list of faculty, and application instructions are available at the LAWDI page on the Digital Classicist wiki.

Working with Text in a Digital Age, RFP

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Tufts University invites applications to “Working with Text in a Digital Age”, a three-week NEH Institute for Advanced Technology in the Digital Humanities (July 23-August 10, 2012) that combines traditional topics such as TEI Markup with training in methods from Information Retrieval, Visualization, and Corpus and Computational Linguistics. Faculty, graduate students, and library professionals are encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit proposals by February 15, 2012. Participant proposals must include CVs and statements of purpose (no more than 1,000 words) describing how they will be able to use participation in the Institute to advance their subsequent careers. Participants must be committed to collaborative work and to publication of results from this Institute under a Creative Commons license. Participants should identify source materials with which they propose to work during the Institute and which must be in the public domain or available under a suitable license. In an ideal case, source materials would include both texts for intensive analysis and annotation and one or more larger corpora to be mined and analyzed more broadly. Statements of purpose must describe initial goals for the Institute. For more information or to submit applications, please contact lcerrato@perseus.tufts.edu.

We particularly encourage participants who are committed to developing research agendas that integrate contributions and research by undergraduates, that expand the global presence of the Humanities, and that, in general, broaden access to and participation in the Humanities. Preference will be given to participants who are best prepared not only to apply new technologies but to do so as a means to transform their teaching and research and the relationship of their work to society beyond academia.