Archive for December, 2012

Diccionario Griego-Español online

Friday, December 21st, 2012

Forwarded for Sabine Arnaud-Thuillier:

The members of the Diccionario Griego-Español project (DGE, CSIC, Madrid) are pleased to announce the release of DGE online (http://dge.cchs.csic.es/xdge/), first digital edition of the published section (α-ἔξαυος) of our Lexicon. Although still in progress, the DGE, written under the direction of Prof. F.R. Adrados, is currently becoming the largest bilingual dictionary of ancient Greek: it already includes about 60,000 entries and 370,000 citations of ancient authors and texts. Simultaneously, we are releasing the edition of LMPG online(http://dge.cchs.csic.es/lmpg/), the digital version of the Lexicon of Magic and Religion in the Greek Magical Papyri, written by Luis Muñoz Delgado (Supplement V of DGE). The digitization of this smaller Lexicon is considered as a successful prototype of this ambitious digitization initiative: further on DGE online will be improved with similar advanced features, such as the implementation of a customized search engine. Any critics and suggestions on that matter will be very welcome. We hope these new open access dictionaries will be of your interest and will become, to some extent, valuable tools for Ancient Greek studies.

Juan Rodríguez Somolinos (Main Researcher) and Sabine Arnaud-Thuillier (responsible for the digital edition)
juan.rodriguez@cchs.csic.es
sabine.thuillier@cchs.csic.es

Workshop on Canonical Text Services: Furman May 19-22, 2013

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

Posted for Christopher Blackwell:

What · With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Furman University’s Department of Classics is offering a workshop on the Canonical Text Services Protocol.

When · May 19 – 22, 2013.

Where · Greenville, South Carolina, (Wikipedia); Furman University.

Who · Applications will be accepted from anyone interested in learning about exposing canonically cited texts online with CTS. We have funds to pay for travel and lodging for six participants.

How · Apply by e-mail to christopher.blackwell@furman.edu by January 31, 2013.

For more information, see http://folio.furman.edu/workshop.html or contact christopher.blackwell@furman.edu

RA Job: The Art of Making in Antiquity (King’s College London)

Monday, December 10th, 2012

Research Assistant position, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London

The Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London is looking for a highly motivated individual to work on The Art of Making in Antiquity project: www.artofmaking.ac.uk

This research-led project explores the tools, techniques and working practices of Roman stone carvers through a unique set of photographic images alongside new contextual information brought together into an innovative online collection employing cutting edge digital solutions including image annotation. This position is an excellent opportunity for a postgraduate student looking for experience to help them move to more advanced research in ancient visual culture and/or the application of the digital humanities to the classical world.

This is a 6-month position and the closing date for applications is the 1st January 2013.

More details about the position and details of how to apply can be found at: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/pertra/vacancy/external/pers_detail.php?jobindex=12621

For an informal discussion of the post please contact Paul Vetch on 020 7848 1040, or via email at paul.vetch@kcl.ac.uk

Suggestions for new Greek, Latin texts? English translations?

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

[Please repost!]

We are preparing for a new set of texts to be entered by the data entry firm with which we work (http://www.digitaldividedata.org/). The next order will be sent in mid December but a more substantial order will be placed early in 2013.

What would you like to see added to the Perseus Digital Library, both for use within the Perseus site and for download as TEI XML under a Creative Commons license? Note that we only enter materials that are in the public domain and that can be freely redistributed for re-use by others.

Some possibilities — but please suggest other things that you find important!

* Scholia of Greek and Latin authors.

* Collections of fragmentary authors

* Sources from later antiquity (esp. Christian sources)

* More English translations

Please think about (1) individual authors and texts and (2) what you would want to see if we could do something big.

If you have individual suggestions, please write gcrane2008@gmail.com. A public discussion via the Digital Classicist would probably be the best.

Let us know what you want!