Archive for May, 2013

Which beginners’ Ancient Greek textbook(s) do you use?

Friday, May 17th, 2013

Dear colleagues,

Please could you take a moment to fill in this survey on the use of textbooks for the teaching of beginners’ Ancient Greek. Only the first three questions are obligatory, and the whole survey should only take a minute to complete. Please circulate this request to any colleagues or communities who may not have seen it here.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FBJ39QL

I’ll post a summary of results to Stoa.org when I’ve collated them in a few weeks time.

A couple of notes:

1. Please answer the questions with regard to your own teaching: only include classes taught by others if you are sure no one else will include them in their answers. (e.g. if you are in a small teaching unit and your colleagues have told you they have no intention of answering). This will never be a comprehensive or reliable survey, but I’d like to avoid any blatant inaccuracy as far as possible.

2. Because of the nature of the questions, this survey is only really appropriate for the anglophone world. I’d be very interested to see more international results, but someone else would need to design the survey.

Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3)

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

Colleagues:

We are very pleased to announce the creation of the Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3), a new Digital Classics R&D unit embedded in the Duke University Libraries, whose start-up has been generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Duke University’s Dean of Arts & Sciences and Office of the Provost.

The DC3 goes live 1 July 2013, continuing a long tradition of collaboration between the Duke University Libraries and papyrologists in Duke’s Department of Classical Studies. The late Professors William H. Willis and John F. Oates began the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (DDbDP) more than 30 years ago, and in 1996 Duke was among the founding members of the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS). In recent years, Duke led the Mellon-funded Integrating Digital Papyrology effort, which brought together the DDbDP, Heidelberger Gesamtverzeichnis der Griechischen Papyrusurkunden Ägyptens (HGV), and APIS in a common search and collaborative curation environment (papyri.info), and which collaborates with other partners, including Trismegistos, Bibliographie Papyrologique, Brussels Coptic Database, and the Arabic Papyrology Database.

The DC3 team will see to the maintenance and enhancement of papyri.info data and tooling, cultivate new partnerships in the papyrological domain, experiment in the development of new complementary resources, and engage in teaching and outreach at Duke and beyond.

The team’s first push will be in the area of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, where it plans to leverage its papyrological experience to serve a much larger community. The team brings a wealth of experience in fields like image processing, text engineering, scholarly data modeling, and building scalable web services. It aims to help create a system in which the many worldwide digital epigraphy projects can interoperate by linking into the graph of scholarly relationships while maintaining the full force of their individuality.

The DC3 team is:

Ryan BAUMANN: Has worked on a wide range of Digital Humanities projects, from applying advanced imaging and visualization techniques to ancient artifacts, to developing systems for scholarly editing and collaboration.

Hugh CAYLESS: Has over a decade of software engineering expertise in both academic and industrial settings. He also holds a Ph.D. in Classics and a Master’s in Information Science. He is one of the founders of the EpiDoc collaborative and currently serves on the Technical Council of the Text Encoding Initiative.

Josh SOSIN: Associate Professor of Classical Studies and History, Co-Director of the DDbDP, Associate editor of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies; an epigraphist and papyrologist interested in the intersection of ancient law, religion, and the economy.

 

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

The programme for the Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013 is now published (the abstracts will be added very soon). Please circulate this via your networks. We have, for several years, been recording these seminars and making the audio files available on our seminar webpage. This year we will be recording video and so presentation slides, audio and video files will be available after each seminar.

The programme flyer can be downloaded as a PDF.

All seminars are on Fridays at 16:30 at Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU.

  • June 7: Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton) Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models
  • June 14: Valeria Vitale (King’s College London) An Ontology for 3D Visualization in Cultural Heritage
  • June 21: Tom Cheesman (University of Swansea) Putting Translations To Work: TransVis
  • June 28: Adrian Ryan (University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa) Quantifying stylistic distance between Athenian vase-paintings
  • July 5: Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania) The Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance: a federated platform for discovery and research
  • July 12: 16:30: Eleni Bozia (University of Florida) The Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project
    17:30: Greta Franzini (University College London) A catalogue of digital editions: Towards an edition of Augustine’s City of God
  • July 19: Federico Boschetti ( ILC-CNR, Pisa) & Bruce Robertson (Mount Allison, Canada) An Integrated System For Generating And Correcting Polytonic Greek OCR
  • July 26: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University) Teaching with the Perseids Platform: Tools and methods
  • August 2: Neel Smith (College of the Holy Cross) Scholarly reasoning and writing in an automatically assembled and tested digital library
  • August 9: Agnes Thomas, Francesco Mambrini & Matteo Romanello (DAI, Berlin) Insights in the World of Thucydides: The Hellespont Project as a research environment for Digital History

Classical Association 2014: Call for Papers: ‘New Approaches to e-Learning in Classics’

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Following on from wide interest shown in this topic at the Classical Association 2013 Conference, it is proposed that similar panels on e-Learning be convened for CA 2014. Papers are sought on topics relating to the use of e-learning in Classical subjects, including Latin, Greek, Classical Civilisation and Ancient History. The organisers are keen to encourage the submission of papers presenting the innovative use of new technologies, as well as discussion papers on the current state of theory and practice in e-Learning for Classics. The scope of this panel covers the educational sector as a whole, from Primary level through to Higher Education.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words will need to be submitted for consideration by the end of August. Please contact panel organiser Bartolo Natoli by email (bnatoli@utexas.edu) or tweet/DM (@banatoli) if you would like to be involved.