Archive for August, 2013

Digital Humanities in new lecture series on history and pubs

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

A new lecture series on history of beer/wine/pubs is starting in London, and the inaugural paper, 18:00 on August 28th,  is from Digital Humanities scholar Harvey Quamen explaining why databases, prosopography and digital mapping are useful for the scholar of the history of brewing (an argument that can of course be extended to all modern history, and for that matter ancient). From the original announcement:

Three major questions—all difficult to answer—prompt this talk:

  1. what caused the sudden demise of porter around 1820?
  2. how did the style called India Pale Ale spread so rapidly?
  3. can we locate the historical London breweries?

Although surrounded in some mystery, these questions might be answerable using some techniques from the digital humanities. In particular, building a database of historical recipes will help us understand the movement and growth of beer styles (especially as those styles moved through homebrewing) and we can begin to track master-apprenticeship relationships with the use of propopographies, databases that serve as “collective biographies” of groups of people. Finally, using historical maps (like the Agas map digitized at the Map of Early Modern London project), we might begin to reconstruct the historical distribution of beer around the capital.

The series will focus on archaeology and history, so more future papers may be of more direct interest to the #DigiClass community too.

Postdoc Research Fellowship in Trier, Germany

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

Seems like two out of three jobs we see advertized in Digital Humanities these days are in Germany (even not counting the recent mass recruitment at Greg Crane’s new shop in Leipzig!), which is both great news for everyone in this field, and a little bit sobering for those us seeing many of our best students and colleagues heading off that way.

The latest announcement comes from Trier (via Laura Löser on the MARKUP list), of a one year DH postdoctoral position at the Kompetenzzentrum there. See http://kompetenzzentrum.uni-trier.de/files/6713/7596/2062/Ausschreibung_Postdoktorandenstipendium.pdf for the full details. Note the closing date is in about three weeks time.

Digital Classicist London Videocasts

Friday, August 16th, 2013

The videocasts for all the 2013 Digital Classicist London summer seminars are now available online at the Seminar Programme page. Each presentation is available as a downloadable or streamable video (MP4), or, for those who prefer audio, as MP3. Slideshows have also been made available in PDF format, although these are generally included in the video as well. Users can receive updates to the series, including videos from the London, Berlin, and occasional other seminars, by subscribing to the Seminar RSS Feed, or following @Stoaorg on Twitter.

Many thanks to our excellent videographer Wilma Stefani for filming and editing the videos, and to all our speakers for permission to share their presentations and slides.

(Thanks also to Christina Kamposiori, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale who helped with the organization and management of the seminars every week.)

Getty Joins Open Content Movement

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

The Getty Museum and research institute have just announced the launch of their Open Content Program, under which they intend to publish as many of their digital resources as they are legally able. In the first instance, they are release high quality digital images of all the public domain works in their collections: 4,600 photographs so far, including a few hundred of their classical sculptures, vases, and other artefacts. (A search for “Greek” within the open content images returns 261 results, and “Roman” 231.)

There is no specific common license attached to these images, but the text says they are re-usable “for any purpose” and without restriction; the objects are in the public domain, and the Getty does not assert copyright on the photographs. (I’ve only found a small number of photographs of inscriptions so far, but I’ll keep hunting!) And I very much hope many more images get added to this collection as the copyright status of further objects is resolved.

I look forward to hearing about innovative, open, and unrestricted projects, mashups, and publications that arise from this.

Last call for abstracts: Leipzig eHumanities seminar

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

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EpiDoc Latest Release (8.17)

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Scott Vanderbilt has just announced the latest release of the EpiDoc Guidelines, Schema, and Example Stylesheets.

Details are available on the Latest Release page of the EpiDoc wiki at SourceForge.