Archive for May, 2014

Web/Database Job at UPenn Museum

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

[Note: I have no official connection to this posting but can vouch for C. Brian Rose as a great person to work with. -Sebastian]

GORDION DATABASE AND WEB DEVELOPER

 

“The Gordion Database and Web Developer is a one-year term position with the possibility of renewal that reports to the Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section and is responsible for the design and implementation of the Gordion Project’s digital resources. These include the back-end database which uses open-source software and the public website housed at http://sites.museum.upenn.edu/gordion/. The Gordion Project in central Turkey has been active since the 1950s and has collected a substantial and growing archive of paper-based and digital information. A significant portion of this archive has been digitized and is available in a content management system. This material is currently used by researchers working to publish the excavation’s results. The project is also committed to sharing this data via its website. The Gordion Database and Web Developer will work with the Gordion Project Archivist to facilitate both internal use and public access. The Gordion Database and Web Developer will also be responsible for database development for ongoing field research in Gordion. Participation in fieldwork at Gordion is also desirable.”

Full posting: https://jobs.hr.upenn.edu/postings/4014

Editing Texts and Digital Libraries: 2 seminars in Leipzig

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Posted for Greta Franzini:

Next week the Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities is hosting two seminars as part of its Digital Philology course:

1) Monday May 19th, 3:15-4:45pm, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“Editing Texts in Context: Two Case Studies” by Rebecca Finnigan, Christine Bannan and Prof. Neel D. Smith, College of the Holy Cross

2) Tuesday May 20th, 9:15-10:45am, University of Leipzig (Paulinum, room P801)
“digilibLT – a Digital Library of Late Latin Texts” by Prof. Maurizio Lana, Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)

For more information, please visit http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/news-announcements/

SNAP:DRGN introduction

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopography: Data and Relations in Greco-roman Names (SNAP:DRGN) is a one-year pilot project, based at King’s College London in collaboration with colleagues from the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (Oxford), Trismegistos (Leuven), Papyri.info (Duke) and Pelagios (Southampton), and hopes to include many more data partners by the end of this first year. Much of the early discussion of this project took place at the LAWDI school in 2013. Our goal is to recommend standards for sharing relatively minimalist data about classical and other ancient prosopographical and onomastic datasets in RDF, thereby creating a huge graph of person-data that scholars can:

  1. query to find individuals, patterns, relationships, statistics and other information;
  2. follow back to the richer and fuller source information in the contributing database;
  3. contribute new datasets or individual persons, names and textual references/attestations;
  4. annotate to declare identity between persons (or co-reference groups) in different source datasets;
  5. annotate to express other relationships between persons/entities in different or the same source dataset (such as familial relationships, legal encounters, etc.)
  6. use URIs to annotate texts and other references to names with the identity of the person to whom they refer (similar to Pelagios’s model for places using Pleiades).

More detailed description (plus successful funding bid document, if you’re really keen) can be found at <http://snapdrgn.net/about>.

Our April workshop invited a handful of representative data-holders and experts in prosopography and/or linked open data to spend two days in London discussing the SNAP:DRGN project, their own data and work, and approaches to sharing and linking prosopographical data in general. We presented a first draft of the SNAP:DRGN “Cookbook”, the guidelines for formatting a subset of prosopographical data in RDF for contribution to the SNAP graph, and received some extremely useful feedback on individual technical issues and the overall approach. A summary of the workshop, and slides from many of the presentations, can be found at <http://snapdrgn.net/archives/110>.

In the coming weeks we shall announce the first public version of the SNAP ontology, the Cookbook, and the graph of our core and partner datasets and annotations. For further discussion about the project, and linked data for prosopography in general, you can also join the Ancient-People Googlegroup (where I posted a summary similar to this post earlier today).