Archive for December, 2015

Call for Papers: 2016 Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities has established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities and Social Sciences, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Monday from April 11th until early July 2016 in the form of 90-minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists. Furthermore, we proudly announce that Prof. Dr. Stefan Gradmann (KU Leuven) will be giving the opening keynote on April 11th.

We invite submissions of abstracts describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the humanities, both in the past and present. We also encourage contributions describing ‘work-in-progress’. Themes may include – but are not limited to –  text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, lexical and conceptual resources for DH, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data.

For more information please visit: http://etrap.gcdh.de/call-for-papers-2016-gottingen-dialog-in-digital-humanities/

Casaubon-Kaibel reference converter for the Deipnosophists of Athenaeus of Naucratis

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

The Casaubon-Kaibel reference converter is a tool for finding concordances between the numerations used in the two editions of the 15 books of the Deipnosophists of Athenaeus of Naucratis by Isaac Casaubon and Georg Kaibel.

By inserting at least one of the two references (by Casaubon or by Kaibel), you get the corresponding reference with links to the relevant pages in the two editions.

Casaubon reference system – Isaac Casaubon (1597)
After the reference to the book number, this system includes an arabic numeral referring to the page of the edition of Casaubon followed by a letter (a-f) corresponding to the subdivision of the page into sections of about ten lines of text (e.g., 12.530d).

Kaibel reference system – Georg Kaibel (1887-1890)
In this system each book is logically divided into paragraphs corresponding to units of sense and the paragraphs are referred to with arabic numerals whose numeration starts again at the beginning of each book (e.g., 12.40).