Archive for April, 2016

Digital Classics outside the Echo-Chamber: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange and Public Engagement

Friday, April 29th, 2016

We’re delighted to announce the publication of the latest volume of essays arising in part from the Digital Classicist seminars in London, Berlin and elsewhere, as an open access publication.

Gabriel Bodard and Matteo Romanello (2016). Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber: Teaching, Knowledge Exchange and Public Engagement. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/bat

cover

Thanks to the generosity of the Knowledge Unlatched programme, this volume is available as Gold Open Access—i.e. you can freely download PDF, Epub or Kindle versions from the publisher’s site under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Print copies are also available for £34.99 hc, £12.99 pb. Review copies will be circulated to appropriate journals and similar venues.

Classical Philology goes digital (Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017)

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Classical Philology goes digital. Working on textual phenomena of ancient texts

University of Potsdam, February 16-17, 2017
http://www.uni-potsdam.de/klassphil/workshop-classical-philology-goes-digital.html

Digital technologies continue to change our daily lives, including the way scholars work. As a result, the Classics are currently also subject to constant change. Having established itself as an important field in the scientific landscape, Digital Humanities (DH) research provides a number of new possibilities to scholars who deal with analyses and interpretations of ancient works. Greek and Latin texts become digitally available and searchable (editing, encoding), they can be analyzed to find certain structures (text-mining), and they can also be provided with metadata (annotation, linking, textual alignment), e.g. according to traditional commentaries to explain terms, vocabulary or syntactic relationships (in particular tree-banking) for intra- and intertextual linking as well as for connections with research literature. Therefore, an important keyword in this is ‘networking,’ because there is so much potential for Classical Philology to collaborate with the Digital Humanities in creating useful tools for textual work, that a clear overview is difficult to obtain. Moreover, this scientific interest is by no means unilateral: Collaboration is very important for Digital Humanities as a way of (further) developing and testing digital methods.
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Epigraphy Editathon, (April 20-22, 2016 – Leipzig)

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016

Epigraphy Editathon (Editing chronological and geographic data in ancient inscriptions)
April 20-22, 2016
Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities – University of Leipzig
Augustusplatz 10, 04109 Leipzig
P 402

April 20, 2016

Morning (paper presentations)
09:00-09:15: Monica Berti: Welcome and Introduction
09:15-09:45: Charlotte Roueché (King’s College London): Making the stones speak
09:45-10:15: Michèle Brunet (Université Lyon 2): IG Louvre: developments and issues – A case study
10:15-10:45: Monica Berti (Universität Leipzig): The Digital Marmor Parium
10:45-11:15: Coffee Break
11:15-11:45: Artemis Karnava (Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften): The Cypriot syllabary of the 1st mill. BC: yet another writing system for the Greek language
11:45-12:15: Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Berlin): Telling stories with the inscription. The EAGLE Storytelling App and beyond
12:15-13:00: Discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: DĀMOS – Database of Mycenean at Oslo (Federico Aurora, University of Oslo)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: Data and standards in the iDAI.world (Francesco Mambrini and Philipp Frank, DAI Berlin)
17:00-18:00: Editing inscriptions in Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 21, 2016

Morning (paper/projects presentations)
09:00-09:30: Silvia Orlandi (Università La Sapienza Roma): Chronological and geographical information in Latin inscriptions: examples and issues
09:30-10:00: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University): Treebanks and meter in 4th century Attic inscriptions
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:00: Chiara Palladino (Università di Bari / Leipzig Universität): Numbers, winds and stars: representing the ancient geographical language in the digital environment
11:00-11:30: Anita Rocco (Università di Bari): Remarks about time and places in the inscriptions by Christians in Rome
11:30-12:00: Martin Scholz (Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg): EDEN, An Epigraphic Web Database of Ancient Inscriptions
12:00-13:00: Gregory Crane (Tufts University / Universität Leipzig): Perseus and Leipzig developments and general discussion

Afternoon (projects/standards presentations)
14:30-15:30: Classroom epigraphy assignments with Perseids (Marie-Claire Beaulieu and Tim Buckingham, Tufts University)
15:30-16:00: Coffee Break
16:00-17:00: EDR – Epigraphic Database Roma (Silvia Evangelisti, Università di Foggia)
17:00-18:00: Pelagios (Rainer Simon, Austrian Institute of Technology)
18:00-19:00: Discussion

April 22, 2016

Morning (projects/standards presentations)
9:00-10:00: EAGLE Project (Pietro Liuzzo, Universität Heidelberg)
10:00-10:30: Coffee Break
10:30-11:30: GODOT: Graph of Dated Objects and Texts (Frank Grieshaber, Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften and Universität Heidelberg)
11:30-12:30: Towards Guidelines for TEI encoding of text artefacts in Egyptology (Daniel Werning, Excellence Cluster Topoi, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)
12:30-13:00: Trismegistos Places: a geographical index for all Latin inscriptions (Herbert Verreth, Leuven University)

Afternoon
14:30-16:30: Round Table