Archive for May, 2017

Digital Classicist London seminar 2017 programme

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017

Institute of Classical Studies

Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

Fridays at 16:30 in room 234*

Jun 2 Sarah Middle (Open University) Linked Data and Ancient World Research: studying past projects from a user perspective
Jun 9 Donald Sturgeon (Harvard University) Crowdsourcing a digital library of pre-modern Chinese
Jun 16* Valeria Vitale et al. (Institute of Classical Studies) Recogito 2: linked data without the pointy brackets
Jun 23* Dimitar Iliev et al. (University of Sofia “St. Kliment Ohridski”) Historical GIS of South-Eastern Europe
Jun 30

&

Lucia Vannini (Institute of Classical Studies) The role of Digital Humanities in Papyrology: Practices and user needs in papyrological research

Paula Granados García (Open University) Cultural Contact in Early Roman Spain through Linked Open Data resources

Jul 7 Elisa Nury (King’s College London) Collation Visualization: Helping Users to Explore Collated Manuscripts
Jul 14 Sarah Ketchley (University of Washington) Re-Imagining Nineteenth Century Nile Travel & Excavation for a Digital Age: The Emma B. Andrews Diary Project
Jul 21 Dorothea Reule & Pietro Liuzzo (Hamburg University) Issues in the development of digital projects based on user requirements. The case of Beta maāḥǝft
Jul 28 Rada Varga (Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca) Romans 1by1: Transferring information from ancient people to modern users

*Except Jun 16 & 23, room G34

digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2017.html

This series is focussed on user and reader needs of digital projects or resources, and assumed a wide definition of classics including the whole ancient world more broadly than only the Greco-Roman Mediterranean. The seminars will be pitched at a level suitable for postgraduate students or interested colleagues in Archaeology, Classics, Digital Humanities and related fields.

Digital Classicist London seminar is organized by Gabriel Bodard, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale (ICS) and Simon Mahony and Eleanor Robson (UCL).

ALL WELCOME

Unlocking Sacred Landscapes, by Giorgos Papantoniou

Friday, May 5th, 2017

Project report by Dr Giorgos Papantoniou, papantog@uni-bonn.de

Previous multi-dimensional approaches to the study of ancient Mediterranean societies have shown that social, economic and religious lives were closely entwined. In attempting to engage with Cyprus’s multiple identities – and the ways in which islanders may have negotiated, performed or represented their identities – several material vectors related to ritual and sacred space must be taken into consideration. The sharp modern distinction between sacred and profane is not applicable to antiquity, and the terms ritual, cult and sacred space in Unlocking Sacred Landscapes: Cypriot Sanctuaries as Economic Units are used broadly to include the domestic and funerary spheres of life as well as formally constituted sanctuaries. Perceiving ritual space as instrumental in forming both power relations and the worldview of ancient people, and taking ancient Cyprus as a case study, the Project aims at elucidating how meanings and identities were diachronically expressed in, or created by, the topographical and economic setting of ritual and its material depositions and dedications.

The evidence of cult or sacred space is very limited and ambiguous before the Late Bronze Age. During the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1700-1125/1100 BC), however ritual spaces were closely linked to industrial activities; the appropriation, distribution, and consumption of various resources (especially copper), labour and land was achieved by the elite through exploitation of supernatural knowledge. The Early Iron Age (ca. 1125/1100-750 BC) landscapes are very difficult to approach. We can, however, identify sanctuary sites in the countryside towards the end of this period. This phenomenon might well relate to the consolidation of the Iron Age Cypriot polities (known in the archaeological literature as Cypriot city-kingdoms) and their territories. While urban sanctuaries become religious communal centres, where social, cultural and political identities are affirmed, an indication of the probable use of extra-urban sanctuaries in the political establishment of the various polities of the Cypro-Archaic (ca. 750-480 BC) and Cypro-Classical (ca. 480-310 BC) periods has recently been put forward.

During the Hellenistic period (ca. 310-30 BC), a process of official neglect of the extra-urban sanctuaries signals a fundamental transformation in the social perception of the land. After the end of the city-kingdoms, and the movement from many political identities to a single identity, extra-urban sanctuaries were important mainly to the local extra-urban population. By the Roman period (ca. 30 BC-330 AD), the great majority of Hellenistic extra-urban sanctuaries are ‘dead’. When the social memory, elite or non-elite, that kept them alive ‘dies’, they ‘die’ with it; what usually distinguishes the surviving sites is what the defunct sites lacked: political scale and significance. As the topography of Roman sanctuary sites reveals, this is not to say that extra-urban sanctuaries did not exist anymore. Over time, however, they started to become primarily the concern of local audiences. The annexation and ‘provincialisation’ of Cyprus, with all the consequent developments, were accompanied by changes in memorial patterns, with less focus on regional or local structures, and more intense emphasis on stressing an ideology which created a more widely recognisable ‘pan-Cypriot’ myth-history, which was eventually related to Ptolemaic, and later to Roman imperial power and ideology.

This Project puts together a holistic, inter-disciplinary approach to the diachronic study of the ancient Cypriot ritual and cult. While it aims at bringing together textual, archaeological, epigraphic, art-historical, and sociological/anthropological evidence, for the first time it incorporates ‘scientific’ spatial analysis and more agent-centred computational models to the study of ancient Cypriot sanctuaries and religion. By inserting in a GIS environment the Cypriot sanctuary sites the relation of sacred landscapes with politico-economic geography put forward above is tested both at regional and at island-wide level.

The Project falls under the umbrella of a larger Research Network entitled Unlocking Sacred Landscapes.

For further information: http://www.ucy.ac.cy/unsala/

Dr Giorgos Papantoniou
Research Training Group 1878: Archaeology of Pre-Modern Economies
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Institut für Archäologie und Kulturanthropologie
Abteilung für Klassische Archäologie
Lennéstr. 1
D-53113, Bonn
Germany

Job advertisement: Postdoctoral Research Associate (KCL)

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017

Posted on behalf of Will Wootton (to whom enquiries should be addressed):

Training in Action: From Documentation to Protection of Cultural Heritage in Libya and Tunisia

As part of this new project funded by the British Council’s Cultural Heritage Protection Fund, a Post-Doctoral position will be employed at King’s College London. The Research Associate will work on the project initially for 10 months, with the contract likely to be renewed for a further 12 months.

The deadline for applications is 10th May. For further information, see here:
https://www.hirewire.co.uk/HE/1061247/MS_JobDetails.aspx?JobID=76726
And here:
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BAY043/post-doctoral-research-associate-on-training-in-action-from-documentation-to-protection-of-cultural-heritage-in-libya-and-tunisia/

We would be most grateful if you could circulate this email to interested parties as the deadline is imminent.

Dr Will Wootton
King’s College London,London WC2R 2LS.
Tel. +44 (0)207 848 1015
Fax +44 (2)07 848 2545

Open Epigraphic Data Unconference, London, May 15, 2017

Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017

Open Epigraphic Data Unconference
10:00–17:00, May 15, 2017, Institute of Classical Studies

This one-day workshop, or “unconference,” brings together scholars, historians and data scientists with a shared interest in classical epigraphic data. The event involves no speakers or set programme of presentations, but rather a loose agenda, to be further refined in advance or on the day, which is to use, exploit, transform and “mash-up” with other sources the Open Data recently made available by the Epigraphic Database Heidelberg under a Creative Commons license. Both present and remote participants with programming and data-processing experience, and those with an interest in discussing and planning data manipulation and aggregation at a higher level, are welcomed.

Places at the event in London are limited; please contact <gabriel.bodard@sas.ac.uk> if you would like to register to attend.

There will also be a Google Hangout opened on the day, for participants who are not able to attend in person. We hope this event will only be the beginning of a longer conversation and project to exploit and disseminate this invaluable epigraphic dataset.