Posts Tagged ‘Latin’

The Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG) is online

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

The Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG) is a project directed by Monica Berti at the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig for producing the digital version of the five volumes of the Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (FHG) edited by Karl Müller in the 19th century.

The FHG consists of a survey of excerpts from many different sources pertaining to more than 600 Greek fragmentary authors. Excluding the first volume, authors are chronologically distributed and cover a period of time from the 6th century BC through the 7th century CE. Fragments are numbered sequentially and arranged according to works and book numbers, when these pieces of information are available in the source texts preserving the fragments. Every Greek fragment is translated or summarized into Latin.

The digital version of FHG vol. 1 is now available online with search functionalities and citation extraction (CTS and CITE URNs). It collects the fragments of 6th-4th century authors (Hecataeus of Miletus, Charon of Lampsacus, Xanthus of Lydia, Hellanicus of Lesbos, Pherecydes of Athens, Acusilaus of Argos, Ephorus of Cuma, Theopompus of Chius, and Phylarchus), Apollodorus of Athens (with fragments of the Bibliotheca), historians of Sicily (Antiochus of Syracuse, Philistus of Syracuse, Timaeus of Tauromenius), and the Atthidographers (Clidemus, Phanodemus, Androtio, Demo, Philochorus, and Ister).

DFHG

Volunteers with excellent Latin sought

Sunday, December 8th, 2013

Ostrakon from Bu Njem

A few volunteers have started gathering for an interesting project, and it occurs to me that others may like to join us. This might be especially appropriate to someone with excellent Latin, a love for the subject, but no current involvement with the classics, and some spare time on their hands. A retired Latin teacher might fit the bill, or someone who completed an advanced classics degree some years ago, but now works in an unrelated field and misses working with ancient texts. Current students and scholars are also more than welcome to participate.

The Papyri.info site includes some 52,000 transcribed texts, of which about 2,000 in Latin, very few translated into English or any other modern language. The collaborative editing tool SoSOL (deployed at papyri.info/editor) allows users to add to or improve existing editions of papyrological texts, for example by adding new translations.

If you think you might like to take part in this exercise, take a look for instance at O. Bu Njem, a corpus of 150 ostraka from the Roman military base at Golas in Libya. The Latin texts (often fragmentary) are already transcribed; do you think you could produce an English translation of a few of these texts, which will be credited to you? Would you like a brief introduction to the SoSOL interface to enable you to add the translations yourself (pending approval by the editorial board)?