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Women in Antiquity: CLAS 330/HUM 330/WS 330 (3 units)
Presession, Summer 1995: Monday, May 15 - Saturday, June 3
9:00 -11:50 AM MTWTHF ML 312
Instructor: Marilyn B. Skinner (mskinner@ccit.arizona.edu)

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Required Textbooks

  1. Lefkowitz, Mary R., and Maureen B. Fant. Women's Life in Greece and Rome, 2nd ed. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 1992.
  2. Pomeroy, Sarah B. Goddesses, Whores, Wives and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity. New York: Schocken, 1975.
  3. Euripides, Four Tragedies I, ed. David Grene and Richmond Lattimore. Chicago: Chicago, 1955.

Writing-emphasis Course The Department of Classics has designated this a "writing-emphasis course." Satisfactory performance on the Upper-Division Writing-Proficiency Examination (UDWPE) is a prerequisite for this course.

Objectives and Scope of the Course

In this course we will examine the supposed origins of the Western European patriarchal system and investigate ancient sex and gender constructs. We will also analyze mythic, literary and religious representations of female figures both divine and human. Lastly, we will attempt to determine the legal and social status of Greek and Roman women, with particular attention to class difference, and to comprehend the realities of women's lives in given times and places as far as evidence allows.

Our reading materials will consist of original texts, literary and non-literary, and contemporary scholarly interpretations of those documents. All works will be read in English. Since this course is offered for credit in the Women's Studies Program, we will approach our inquiry from a feminist perspective. Free exchange of opinion, however, is an important part of the learning experience, and opposing views are assured a courteous hearing.

The primary goal of the course is to familiarize you with the Greco-Roman sex/gender system, in the hope that you will gain new insights into sexual difference as it operates within our own culture. A secondary objective is to give you practice in critical thinking through class discussion and writing reports and essays.

Course Requirements

ATTENDANCE AND PREPARATION. Work in summer session courses is accelerated. To get the most out of this course, it is important that you come to class each day with the complete reading assignment prepared in advance. Attendance will be taken and poor preparation noted. If you must be absent, please notify me beforehand. More than two unexcused absences will result in a lowered course grade.

WRITING ASSIGNMENTS. All written assignments must be typed or word processed. Handwritten submissions will not be accepted. Papers that do not meet minimum length requirements or do not otherwise conform to guidelines for reports and essays distributed in class will be returned ungraded. Written rules for rewriting graded assignments in order to receive a higher grade will also be distributed. At the instructor's discretion, unexcused late assignments may be penalized by lowering the grade. Late grades cannot be subsequently adjusted.

EXAMINATION. There will be a two-hour comprehensive final examination on June 3, 1995, from 9:00-10:50 a.m. The examination will be objective, testing knowledge of factual material learned from readings and class lectures. Test format could contain any or all of the following: brief identifications, true or false and multiple choice questions, matching columns, and short answer questions.

GRADING. Each student will be given a writing assignment grade based upon the average of the two paper grades and the book report grade. This will count for 50% of the final grade. The final examination will count for the other 50%. Attendance, preparation, and class participation will be taken into account in borderline situations. I reserve the right to modify the grading procedure described above in the interests of overall fairness.

Cheating and Plagiarism: Violations of the Code of Integrity, which prohibits students from cheating on examinations or attempting to earn credit for written work not their own, will be punished by the instructor in accordance with sanctions prescribed by the Code of Integrity. Sanctions include, but are not limited to, a grade of "E" on the examination or writing project or a failing grade in the course.

Reserve Books and Materials: Books for the book report assignment and required scholarly readings have been placed at the reserve desk in the current periodicals section of the university library. Books are on 7-day reserve and readings on 2-hour reserve. Books placed on the list were chosen because they address issues specifically dealt with in this course. Other books may not be substituted without the instructor's permission.

PLEASE NOTE: As a matter of policy, I do not give extensions on assignments or grant incompletes except in documented cases involving a serious personal emergency (e.g., illness requiring hospitalization, death in family, etc.). You will be expected to take examinations and hand in papers on the appointed dates as specified below. Please plan your schedules accordingly.


Schedule

Classes will begin at 9:00 A.M. We will take a ten-minute break at 10:30 A.M. and resume promptly at 10:40 A.M. Students who do not return after the break will be marked absent for the remainder of the class period.

Week 1, May 15-19:

PATRIARCHY

ANCIENT DIVINITIES

HOMERIC WOMEN

EURIPIDES, MEDEA, in Grene and Lattimore

DARK AGES AND ARCHAIC PERIOD


Week 2, May 22-26:

WOMEN IN CLASSICAL ATHENS

FIRST PAPER DUE MAY 22

PRIVATE LIFE IN CLASSICAL ATHENS

IMAGES OF WOMEN IN GREEK LITERATURE

WOMEN IN THE HELLENISTIC WORLD

WOMEN IN ROMAN LAW AND SOCIETY


Week 3, May 30-Jun. 3:

WOMEN IN ROMAN LAW AND SOCIETY (continued)

SECOND PAPER DUE MAY 30

WORKING CLASS ROMAN WOMEN

WOMEN IN ROMAN RELIGION

GREEK AND ROMAN WOMEN WRITERS

FINAL REVIEW AND COURSE EVALUATION

BOOK REPORT DUE JUNE 2

Final Examination: Saturday, June 3, 9:00-10:50 A.M.


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