Erased and Lost

Text deliberately erased in antiquity of which no trace now remains on the stone or papyrus, and which cannot be restored by the editor.

Two different TEI tags are used to indicate erased and un-restored text: the <del> element indicates the editor's assertion than the text was purposefully erased by an ancient hand (rather than, say, damaged by accident, weather or modern activity); the gap element indicates more objectively that whatever text or other decoration was originally inscribed on this surface is no longer evident at all.

Characters erased in antiquity and completely lost should therefore be tagged using the <del> element (if appropriate assigning to the rend attribue a value, most likely "erasure"). A gap element should be placed inside the <del>, to indicate that the erased text is not restored, and will be given a reason, unit, and either quantity or extent attributes, as usual.

‘[[[...]]] or [[[c.7]]] or [[[---]]]’Silvio Panciera V.3‘⟦[ - ca.? - ]⟧’Josh Sosin
<del rend="erasure">
 <gap
   reason="lost"
   quantity="3"
   unit="character"/>

</del>

Transformation using the example EpiDoc P5 stylesheets:

  • Default style (Panciera) style: ⟦[...]⟧
  • London style: ⟦[...]⟧
  • Duke Databank style: ⟦[...]⟧

()
<del rend="erasure">
 <gap
   reason="lost"
   quantity="4"
   unit="character"/>

</del>

Transformation using the example EpiDoc P5 stylesheets:

  • London style: ⟦[. 4.]⟧

(IRT: 445)
<del rend="erasure">
 <gap
   reason="illegible"
   quantity="3"
   unit="character"/>

</del>

Transformation using the example EpiDoc P5 stylesheets:

  • Duke Databank style: ⟦...⟧

(DDbDP: bgu.7.1621)

Responsibility for this section

  1. Beatrice Lietz, author
  2. Charlotte Tupman, author
  3. Gabriel Bodard, author
Date: 2014-05-06