Digital Classicist London live-casts

June 4th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

For the first time this year, the Digital Classicist London seminars will be live-cast via the Web, so colleagues who are unable to make it to the events themselves at 16:30 (British Summer Time) on a Friday afternoon, can watch and listen along at the DCLS YouTube channel at:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIamtu1Z62wL5XRk2mE8HKw

Or watch the edited video which will appear in the same page a few days later.

For those who need a reminder, the seminars run every Friday afternoon in June – August, and this year’s programme can be found at:

http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2015.html

Harpokration On Line

June 2nd, 2015 by Ryan Baumann

The Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3) is pleased to announce the Harpokration On Line project, which aims to provide open-licensed collaboratively-sourced translation(s) for Harpokration’s “Lexicon of the Ten Orators”.

Users can view and contribute translations at http://dcthree.github.io/harpokration/ or download the project data from GitHub. Detailed instructions for contributing translations can also be found in the announcement blog post.

The project (and name) draw inspiration from the Stoa-hosted Suda On Line project.

The code used to run the project is openly available at https://github.com/dcthree/harpokration. The project also leverages the existing CTS/CITE architecture. This architecture, pioneered for other Digital Classics projects, allows us to build on well-developed concepts for organizing texts and translations—concepts which are transformable to other standards such as OAC and RDF. Driving a translation project using CITE annotations against passages of a “canonical” CTS text seemed a natural fit. Using Google Fusion Tables, Google authentication, and client-side JavaScript for the core of our current implementation has also allowed us to rapidly develop relatively lightweight mechanisms for contributing, using freely-available hosting and tools (GitHub Pages, Google App Engine) for the initial phases of the project.

The DC3 is excited to see where this project leads, and hopes to also lead by example in publishing this project using open tools under an open license, with openly-licensed contributions.

Digital Humanities Quarterly CFP

June 2nd, 2015 by Anna Foka

Existing digital tools and related models carry assumptions of knowledge as primarily visual, thus neglecting other sensory or experiential detail and sustaining traditional and often ocularcentric humanities research (Howes, 2005, p. 14; Classen, 1997, pp. 401-12). The excuse is that intangible artefacts, such as senses, movement or emotions leave no traces or evidence, so we cannot reproduce them in their entirety (see Betts 2016 and Foka 2016). While we argue that the lack of evidence is in fact present in any aspect of historical research, we wish to add to related criticisms of knowledge production by challenging current digital research that sustains the past as sanitised historio-cultural ideal (Westin, 2012; Tziovas, 2014). Positing that novel technological methods and tools may help to combat this view, and give us a further insight into historically situated life, this special issue aims to examine the question of whether and how digital technology may facilitate a different and deeper understanding of historically situated life as a sensory and emotional experience. This special issue currently planned for the Digital Humanities Quarterly will contribute to the sensory turn in archaeology and historical research by demonstrating the potential of digital humanities to mobilize a deeper understanding of the past. By discussing the possibilities and problems of (a) digital recreation(s) of narratives and monuments, we further aim to address ways of conveying digital ekphrasis (Lindhé, 2013). Similar to the rhetorical device of ekphrasis, which may be used to describe any experience, digital technology can be a means through which to recreate, experience and study the past in a way that challenges prescribed notions of it.

We are looking for contributions that deal with (but are not limited to)

1. tangible and sensory technologies for the study of the past
2. Technological advancements in the study of archaeological fieldwork
3. Ways to digitally convey and research narratives
4. Gaming engines
5. immersive screens, kinect and other platforms for the study and display of history.

We are envisioning the first drafts to be handed in to us for peer review around December 2015 and about 4 more months for corrections making the publication available around early summer 2016.

Please submit your 300 word abstract no later than the 15th of June at
anna.foka@umu.se

Very much looking forward to receiving your contributions!

The ctp2015 team
http://www.challengethepast.com

Linked Data for the Humanities Workshop in Oxford

May 21st, 2015 by Tom Elliott

Via Terhi Nurmikko:

Linked Data for the Humanities Workshop: A semantic web of scholarly data
Part of the Digital Humanities Oxford Summer School, held 20th – 24th July 2015.
Book your place via http://dhoxss.humanities.ox.ac.uk/2015/linkeddata.html

Come and learn from experts and engage with participants from around the world, from every field and career stage. Develop your knowledge and acquire new skills to support your interest in Linked Data for the Humanities. Immerse yourself in this specialist topic for a week, and widen your horizons through the keynote and additional sessions.

The Linked Data in the Humanities workshop introduces the concepts and technologies behind Linked Data and the Semantic Web and teaches attendees how they can publish their research so that it is available in these forms for reuse by other humanities scholars, and how to access and manipulate Linked Data resources provided by others. The Semantic Web tools and methods described over the week use distinct but interwoven models to represent services, data collections, workflows, and the domain of an application. Topics covered will include: the RDF format; modelling your data and publishing to the web; Linked Data; querying RDF data using SPARQL; and choosing and designing vocabularies and ontologies.

The workshop comprises a series of lectures and hands-on tutorials. Lectures introduce theoretical concepts in the context of Semantic Web systems deployed in and around the humanities, many of which are introduced by their creators. Each lecture is paired with a practical session in which attendees are guided through their own exploration of the topics covered.

Book your place via http://dhoxss.humanities.ox.ac.uk/2015/linkeddata.html

For more information about the Digital Humanities Oxford Summmer School, see http://dhoxss.humanities.ox.ac.uk/2015/ .

Summer School on 3D Data in Anthropology and Archaeology at Bologna

May 20th, 2015 by Tom Elliott

Noted on the web page of the Department of Cultural Heritage at the University of Bologna: a summer short-course entitled “Acquiring and post-processing 3D data in Anthropology and Archaeology”. To be taught in English, the course is advertised run 1-10 July 2015 in Bologna. Registration and a deposit on the course fee must be made prior to 31 May; full payment of 2.100 € (lectures, network access, course materials, coffee, and lunches inclusive) is due by June 20th.

Further information is available via the Department’s online announcement.

Post-doctoral Research Position in Interactive Text Visualization

May 12th, 2015 by Tom Elliott

Via Sam Huskey on the Digital Classicist List:

The Digital Latin Library (DLL) project at the University of Oklahoma invites applications for a post-doctoral research position in interactive text visualization.

The DLL project is led by Drs. Sam Huskey (Classics), June Abbas (Library & Information Science), and Chris Weaver (Computer Science). Dr. Weaver will serve as primary mentor.

We seek a post-doctoral researcher with a background in information visualization, visual analytics, and/or human computer interaction. The ideal candidate will have a PhD and an excellent research track record in a relevant field such as computer science, data science, information science, or digital humanities. Substantial experience with user-centered design and rigorous evaluation of interactive visualization tools is essential. Experience with implementation of interactive visualization tools is also highly desired.

Duties and responsibilities will include planning and execution of funded research projects, supervision of graduate and undergraduate research assistants, writing and presentation of research results in academic journals and at scientific conferences, and active participation in a large, collaborative research project. Teaching opportunities may be available if desired.

This is a full time, non-tenure position, with renewal dependent upon performance and availability of funds. Availability of funds is anticipated through June 2017. The earliest and preferred start date is May 16, 2015.

To apply, send your application, including CV and references, to weaver@cs.ou.edu. Please include a one-page statement of your research motivation and interests. Applications will be accepted on an ongoing basis until the position is filled.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity employer. Protected veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Digital Classicist London seminar, summer 2015

April 28th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

Summer 2015 programme

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies seminars

Meetings are on Fridays at 16:30 in room G21A*, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

(*except June 14 in Room 348; June 26 and July 3, not in ICS—see below)

ALL WELCOME

Seminars will be followed by refreshments

Jun 5 Jen Hicks (UCL) From lost archives to digital databases (abstract)
Jun 12 Leif Isaksen, Pau de Soto (Southampton), Elton Barker (Open University) and Rainer Simon (Vienna) Pelagios and Recogito: an annotation platform for joining a linked data world (abstract) Rm 348
Jun 19 Emma Payne (UCL) Digital comparison of 19th century plaster casts and original classical sculptures (abstract)
Jun 26 Various speakers (King, Knight, Kyvernitou, Rublack, Steiner, Vannini) Short presentations from Digital Humanities / Digital Classics MA students (titles and abstracts) (UCL Foster Court G31)
Jul 3 Francesca Giovannetti, Asmita Jain, Ethan Jean-Marie, Paul Kasay, Emma King, Theologis Strikos, Argula Rublack and Kaijie Ying (King’s College London) The Pedagogical Value of Postgraduate Involvement in Digital Humanities Departmental Projects (abstract) (KCL, 26-29 Drury Lane, rm 212)
Jul 10 Monica Berti, Gregory R. Crane (Leipzig), Kenny Morrell (Center for Hellenic Studies) Sunoikisis DC – An International Consortium of Digital Classics Programs (abstract)
Jul 17 Hugh Cayless (Duke) Integrating Digital Epigraphies (IDEs) (abstract)
Jul 24 Saskia Peels (Liège) A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms Project (CGRN) (abstract)
Jul 31 Federico Aurora (Oslo) DAMOS – Database of Mycenaean at Oslo (abstract)
Aug 7 Usama Gad (Heidelberg) Graecum-Arabicum-Latinum Encoded Corpus (GALEN©) (abstract)
Aug 14 Sarah Hendriks (Oxford) Digital technologies and the Herculaneum Papyri (abstract)

(Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Hugh Bowden, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman.)

Hackathon on Text Re-use

April 15th, 2015 by Greta Franzini

Digital Humanities Hackathon on Text Re-Use
‘Don’t leave your data problems at home!’
27-31 July, 2015

Hosted by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH), Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Germany
Organised by: Emily Franzini, Greta Franzini and Maria Moritz

The Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities will host a Hackathon targeted at students and researchers with a humanities background who wish to improve their computer skills by working with their own data-set. Rather than teaching everything there is to know about algorithms, the Hackathon will assist participants with their specific data-related problem, so that they can take away the knowledge needed to tackle the issue(s) at hand. The focus of this Hackathon is automatic text re-use detection and aims at engaging participants in intensive collaboration. Participants will be introduced to technologies representing the state of the art in the field and shown the potential of text re-use detection. Participants will also be able to equip themselves with the necessary knowledge to make sense of the output generated by algorithms detecting text re-use, and will gain an understanding of which algorithms best fit certain types of textual data. Finally, participants will be introduced to some text re-use visualisations.

For more information about the Hackathon, please visit: http://etrap.gcdh.de/?p=669

Funded PhD: Iron Age and Roman Settlements (KCL)

April 1st, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

Professor Sir Richard Trainor doctoral studentship: ‘Settlement and connectivity in the English Channel: the Isle of Wight and its setting in the Iron Age and Roman periods.’

This project exploits the rich material record of Wight and its environs, with a particular focus on the abundant digital data recorded by the Portable Antiquities Scheme. It is to be supervised by Dr John Pearce (Classics), Dr Stuart Dunn (Department of Digital Humanities) and Dr Sam Moorhead (British Museum). Details of the studentship and the application process (deadline 1st May 2015) can be found on the Trainor Studentships webpage.

John Pearce (john.pearce@kcl.ac.uk) and Stuart Dunn (stuart.dunn@kcl.ac.uk) are happy to discuss the project with prospective applicants.

CfP: Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities

February 23rd, 2015 by Greta Franzini

The Göttingen Dialog in Digital Humanities (GDDH) has established a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied to all areas of the Humanities, including Classics, Philosophy, History, Literature, Law, Languages, Social Science, Archaeology and more. The initiative is organized by the Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities (GCDH).

The dialogs will take place every Tuesday at 5pm from late April until early July 2015 in the form of 90 minute seminars. Presentations will be 45 minutes long and delivered in English, followed by 45 minutes of discussion and student participation. Seminar content should be of interest to humanists, digital humanists, librarians and computer scientists.

We invite submissions of complete papers describing research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the Humanities, both in the past and present. Themes may include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based
modelling, or efficient visualization of big and humanities-relevant data. Papers should be written in English. Successful papers will be submitted for publication as a special issue of Digital Humanities Quarterly (DHQ). Furthermore, the author(s) of the best paper will receive a prize of €500, which will be awarded on the basis of both the quality and the delivery of the paper.

A small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Full papers should be sent by March 20th to gkraft@gcdh.de in Word .docx format. There is no limitation in length but the suggested minimum is 5000 words. The full programme, including the venue of the dialogs, will be sent to you by April 1st.

For any questions, do not hesitate to contact gkraft@gcdh.de
For further information and updates, visit http://www.gcdh.de/en/events/gottingen-dialog-digital-humanities/

GDDH Board (in alphabetical order):

Camilla Di Biase-Dyson (Georg August University Göttingen)
Marco Büchler (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jens Dierkes (Göttingen eResearch Alliance)
Emily Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Greta Franzini (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Angelo Mario Del Grosso (ILC-CNR, Pisa, Italy)
Berenike Herrmann (Georg August University Göttingen)
Péter Király (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Gabriele Kraft (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Bärbel Kröger (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Maria Moritz (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Sarah Bowen Savant (Aga Khan University, London, UK)
Oliver Schmitt (Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen)
Sree Ganesh Thotempudi (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities)
Jörg Wettlaufer (Göttingen Centre for Digital Humanities & Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)
Ulrike Wuttke (Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

This event is financially supported by the German Ministry of Education and Research (No. 01UG1509).

Digital Classicist New England, Spring 2015

February 17th, 2015 by Stella Dee

We are pleased to announce the schedule for Digital Classicist New England. This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organized in association with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University. It will run during the spring term of the academic year 2014/15.

Seminars will run from February through April 2015 and will be hosted at Brandeis, Holy Cross, Northeastern and Tufts. Each lecture will take place from 12:00-1:15pm Eastern Standard time–while light snacks and drinks will be provided, attendees are also welcome to bring their own lunch!

As with the previous series, the video recordings of the presentations will be broadcast in realtime via videochat for later publication online, and questions for speakers will be accepted via an IRC channel. There are plans to publish papers selected from the first series of the seminar as a special issue in an appropriate open access journal.

Information concerning how to access the realtime video of the talks will be made available here shortly before the lecture.

We will continue to update the schedule  over the course of the spring with more information concerning each speaker. Flyers and other materials for printing and publicity can be found in the Google Drive folder here, which we will also continue to update with individual flyers for each speaker.

This series is supported by Brandeis University, including the Brandeis Library and Technology Services and the Department of Classical Studies, The College of the Holy Cross, Northeastern University, Tufts University and the Perseus Project. The series has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating 50 Years of Excellence.

Sunoikisis DC Planning Seminar, Leipzig, February 16-18

February 16th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

Sunoikisis is a successful national consortium of Classics programs developed by the Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies. The goal is to extend Sunoikisis to a global audience and contribute to it with an international consortium of Digital Classics programs (Sunoikisis DC). Sunoikisis DC is based at the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig. The aim is to offer collaborative courses that foster interdisciplinary paradigms of learning. Master students of both the humanities and computer science are welcome to join the courses and work together by contributing to digital classics projects in a collaborative environment.

Read the rest of this entry »

Survey: Disciplinary analysis of Digital Humanities

February 5th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

The following survey from Clare Hooper (IT Innovation Centre, Southampton) will contribute to ongoing work analysing the disciplinary and thematic contributions to DH from a combination of quantitative study of published papers and response from experts. Full survey at https://www.isurvey.soton.ac.uk/14422

An Invitation to Explore the Digital Humanities

Can you spare time to help our understanding of the Digital Humanities? I’m doing a disciplinary analysis of research contributions in DH. As part of the work, I’m seeking expert input on what disciplines are represented by certain keywords. I’d be most grateful for your input.

If you have any questions, please contact me, Clare Hooper, via email: cjh@it-innovation.soton.ac.uk. Please also let me know if you’d like to be kept informed about the results of this work.

Many thanks for your time!

—Clare Hooper

Digital Classics: Ancient History Seminar, Oxford, Hilary 2015

January 27th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

Ancient History Seminar, Hilary Term 2015
Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford

(Full programme and webcast links)

Convenor: Jonathan Prag
A series of seminars looking at a number of current major projects to apply digital techniques to the study of the ancient world. These seminars will be webcast using the Panopto software.

Tuesdays, 5pm
Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St Giles’, Oxford

20 January 2015
Dr Elton Barker (Open University)
Mapping Herodotus: countercartography, networks and bottomless maps
http://pelagios-project.blogspot.co.uk/p/about-pelagios.html and http://hestia.open.ac.uk/

27 January
Dr James Cummings (University of Oxford)
What is TEI? And Why Should I Care?
http://www.tei-c.org/index.xml

3 February
Dr Pietro Liuzzo (EAGLE)
The Europeana best practice network of Ancient Greek and Latin Epigraphy
http://www.eagle-network.eu/

10 February
Prof. Mark Depauw (KU Leuven)
Trismegistos: A Tool for the Study of the Ancient World
http://www.trismegistos.org/

24 February
Dr Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London)
Bringing People Together: Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies (SNAP:DRGN)
http://snapdrgn.net/

3 March
Dr Monica Berti (University of Leipzig)
The Digital Marmor Parium
http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/projects/open-greek-and-latin-project/digital-marmor-parium/

10 March
Prof. Andrew Meadows (University of Oxford)
Sharing the Wealth: Numismatics in a World of Linked Open Data
http://nomisma.org/

All talks start at 5pm, and are followed by discussion and drinks.

If you wish to dine with the speaker afterwards, at a local restaurant, please contact the convenor : jonathan.prag @ merton.ox.ac.uk.

Digital Classicist London 2015 CFP

January 20th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

The Digital Classicist London seminars provide a forum for research into the ancient world that employs innovative digital and interdisciplinary methods. The seminars are held on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU.

We are seeking contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. We welcome papers discussing individual projects and their immediate contexts, but also wish to accommodate the broader theoretical considerations of the use of digital methods in the study of the ancient world, including ancient cultures beyond the classical Mediterranean. You should expect a mixed audience of classicists, philologists, historians, archaeologists, information scientists and digital humanists, and take particular care to cater for the presence of graduate students in the audience.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of no more than 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight GMT on March 8th, 2015.

Organised by Gabriel Bodard, Hugh Bowden, Stuart Dunn, Simon Mahony and Charlotte Tupman. Further information and details of past seminars, including several peer-reviewed publications, are available at: http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/

Post-doc on Late Antique juristic texts, Pavia

January 20th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Luigi Pellecchi:

The research Project Redhis, “Rediscovering the hidden structure. A new appreciation of Juristic texts and Patterns of Thought in Late Antiquity,” has an open position for a post-doctoral researcher.
The appointment would be for two years in the first instance; this term may be extended for an additional two-year period (up to a total period of four years).Redhis  is an interdisciplinary research project which is hosted by the Università di Pavia (Italy) and funded by an ERC-advanced grant (Principal Investigator prof. Dario Mantovani; Senior Staff prof. Luigi Pellecchi). The project focuses on the elements which display the persistence of an high-level legal culture in Late Antiquity, as also shown by the copying and use of classical jurists’ writings. A comprehensive understanding of legal culture includes therefore the study of the legal texts’ manuscript transmission and of their contents.

From this viewpoint, the appointed candidate will contribute to the project conducting “A study of the textual tradition of Roman legal writings in Late Antiquity”.In pursuing his/her research, the appointed applicant will be supervised by the Principal Investigator. He/she will collaborate with other staff and post-doctoral researchers in an interdisciplinary working group. Place of work: University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy).

Preference will be given to applicants who hold a PhD awarded by a University abroad, with a research thesis in one of the following scientific areas: Roman Law, Papyrology, Latin Language and Literature, Classical Philology, Ancient History. The research thesis has to show the applicant’s competence to apply a philological approach to the study of Roman legal texts, in Latin and Greek, in order to contribute to the attainment of the research Project Redhis objectives. Experience in writing and translating into English is also welcomed.

Deadline: Applications must be sent by February 22, 2015 (at 12 a.m).

How to Apply: See the full call for application:
http://www.unipv.eu/site/home/ricerca/assegni-di-ricerca.html (scroll to the bottom of the page)

To learn more about the Redhis Project, visit our website at http://redhis.unipv.it/

You may freely pass on the information to your Post-doc students and other interested parties.

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 20-24, 2015

January 12th, 2015 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications for a 5-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, April 20-24, 2015. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the workshop, but participants should arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a community of practice and guidance for using TEI XML for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, Vindolanda Tablets Online, Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri and Digital Corpus of Literary Papyri, and is also being used by Perseus Digital Library and EAGLE Europeana Project. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, identifying and linking to external person and place authorities, and use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology, and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors and professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email simona.stoyanova@informatik.uni-leipzig.de with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant background and experience, by Friday February 27th, 2015.

Humanités numériques: l’exemple de l’Antiquité (Grenoble, Sept 2-4, 2015)

November 28th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

(Version française dessous)

The University ‘Stendhal’ of Grenoble 3, the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme-Alpes, L’Université Grenoble 2, the Humboldt Chair for Digital Humanities and HISOMA  organise the conference “Digital Humanities: the example of Antiquity”. The conference will take place in Grenoble, from the 2nd to the 4th of September 2015.

The goal of this conference is twofold: at the same time an assessment of existing methodologies and a looking forward to new ones. It also has the objective of evaluating current practices of the application of Digital Humanities to the study of antiquity, practices which are quite numerous but also sometimes disconnected from each other and without an overall understanding. The conference also aims to contribute toward the design of new projects and the opening new paths, by establishing a dialogue between scholars for whom the Digital Humanities are already familiar and those wishing to acquire knowledge and practice in this domain.
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Round table: Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts

November 27th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Linking Ancient People, Places, Objects and Texts
a round table discussion
Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Daniel Pett (British Museum), Humphrey Southall (Portsmouth), Charlotte Tupman (KCL); with response by Eleanor Robson (UCL)

18:00, Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014
Anatomy Museum, Strand Building 6th Floor
(http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/download/KBLevel6forweb.pdf)
King’s College London, Strand London WC2R 2LS

As classicists and ancient historians have become increasingly reliant on large online research tools over recent years, it has become ever more imperative to find ways of integrating those tools. Linked Open Data (LOD) has the potential to leverage both the connectivity, accessibility and universal standards of the Web, and the power, structure and semantics of relational data. This potential is being used by several scholars and projects in the area of ancient world and historical studies. The SNAP:DRGN project (snapdrgn.net) is using LOD to bring together many technically varied databases and authorities lists of ancient persons into a single virtual authority file; the Pleiades gazetteer and service projects such as Pelagios and PastPlace are creating open vocabularies for historical places and networks of references to them. Museums and other heritage institutions are at the forefront of work to encode semantic archaeological and material culture data, and projects such as Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (ancientwisdoms.ac.uk) and the Homer Multitext (homermultitext.org) are developing citation protocols and an ontology for relating texts with variants, translations and influences.

The panel will introduce some of these key projects and concepts, and then the audience will be invited to participate in open discussion of the issues and potentials of Linked Ancient World Data.

Conference: Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations of History (Gothenburg, March 19-21 2015)

October 24th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Reposted from Critical Heritage Studies blog (thanks to Anna Foka):

March 19-21 2015, Gothenburg. Deadline for abstracts November 20, 2014

Full call here

A Critical Approach to Visual and Multi-Sensory Representations for History and Culture.

A conference for scholars and practitioners who study the implementation and potential of visual and multi-sensory representations to challenge and diversify our common understanding of history and culture.

Abstracts for research papers, posters, visual and multi-sensory demonstrations of ongoing projects, workshops, panels, and organised sessions on the conference themes will be accepted until November 20, 2014.

www.challengethepast.com

challengethepast@gu.se

Supporting partners:
Critical Heritage Studies (University of Gothenburg) //  HUMlab (Umeå University) // Visual Arena // Malmö Museer

Petition on software in research

October 16th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Giacomo Peru (EPCC, University of Edinburgh):

As a ‘lapsed classicist’, and on behalf of the Software Sustainability Institute (SSI) at the University of Edinburgh, for whom I now work, I would like if I may to draw your attention to a petition, launched by SSI, which seeks to assert the fundamental importance of software to today’s research:

http://bit.ly/SoftwareIsFundamental

and on Twitter:

I would like to ask a few minutes of your attention to read the petition and, if you agree, to sign it.

Perhaps because software is intangible, we have become accustomed to focussing on only the hardware that makes research possible. But with very few exceptions, every significant advance in research over the last thirty years would have been impossible without software. I would like to see these advances continue, but that won’t happen if the research community overlooks the role of software.

Thank you and best regards.

Stage d’ecdotique. 16-20 février 2015

October 13th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Guillaime Bady:

Chères/chers collègues,
Je vous annonce que le prochain stage d’ecdotique des Sources Chrétiennes aura lieu du 16 au 20 février 2015, avec une initiation à la paléographie le 15 février, et une table-ronde le 19 février, à laquelle je vous invite chaleureusement à participer.

Vous trouverez en pièce jointe l’affiche du stage (le programme n’est pas encore disponible).

Pour une présentation du stage:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/formation/stage-ecdotique-stage-2015

Formulaire de préinscription:
http://www.sourceschretiennes.mom.fr/webform/preinscription-stage-ecdotique-2015

Appel à contribution pour la Table-ronde:
http://ecdotique.hypotheses.org/544

En espérant que les dates retenues, choisies en fonction des disponibilités des intervenants, seront opportunes, d’avance je vous remercie pour la publicité que vous pourrez faire à cette annonce.

Avec mes plus cordiales salutations,

Guillaume Bady

Chercheur CNRS à HiSoMA-Sources Chrétiennes (UMR 5189)
22 rue Sala
69002 Lyon

CFP: Seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age

October 1st, 2014 by Tom Elliott

The Digital Latin Library, a joint project of the Society for Classical Studies, the Medieval Academy of America, and the Renaissance Society of America, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, announces a seminar on Latin textual criticism in the digital age. The seminar will take place on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, the DLL’s host institution, on June 25–26, 2015.

We welcome proposals for papers on all subjects related to the intersection of modern technology with traditional methods for editing Latin texts of all eras. Suggested topics:

  • Keeping the “critical” in digital critical editions
  • The scholarly value of editing texts to be read by humans and machines
  • Extending the usability of critical editions beyond a scholarly audience
  • Visualizing the critical apparatus: moving beyond a print-optimized format
  • Encoding different critical approaches to a text
  • Interoperability between critical editions and other digital resources
  • Dreaming big: a wishlist of features for the optimal digital editing environment

Of particular interest are proposals that examine the scholarly element of preparing a digital edition.

The seminar will be limited to ten participants. Participants will receive a stipend, and all travel and related expenses will be paid by the DLL.

Please send proposals of no more than 650 words to Samuel J. Huskey at dll-seminar@ou.edu by December 1, 2014. Notification of proposal status will be sent in early January.

Digital Classicist New England seminar 2015 CFP

September 2nd, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

[original link]

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the third series of the Digital Classicist New England (Boston). This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organized in association with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University. It will run during the spring term of the academic year 2014/15.

We invite submissions on any kind of research which employs digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable a better or new understanding of the ancient world. We encourage contributions not only from students of Greco-Roman but also from other areas of the pre-modern world, such as Egypt and the Near East, Ancient China and India.

Themes may include digital editions, natural language processing, image processing and visualisation, linked data and the semantic web, open access, spatial and network analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. We welcome seminar proposals addressing the application of these methods to individual projects, and particularly contributions which show how the digital component can facilitate the crossing of disciplinary boundaries and answering new research questions. Seminar content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, as well as to information scientists and digital humanists, with an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of these fields.

Anonymised abstracts [1] of 500 words max. (bibliographic references excluded) should be uploaded by midnight (CET) on 01 November 2014 using the special submission form. When submitting the same proposal for consideration to multiple venues, please do let us know via the submission form (to be posted later).

Seminars will run from mid-January through April 2015 and will be hosted at Brandeis, Holy Cross, Northeastern and Tufts. The full programme, including the venue of each seminar, will be finalised and announced in December. In order to facilitate real-time participation from California to Europe, seminars will take place in the early afternoon and will be accessible online as Google Hangouts.

As with the previous series, the video recordings of the presentations will be published online and we endeavour to provide accommodation for the speakers and contribute towards their travel expenses. There are plans to publish papers selected from the first series of the seminar as a special issue in an appropriate open access journal.

[1] The anonymized abstract should have all author names, institutions and references to the authors work removed. This may lead to some references having to be replaced by “Reference to authors’ work”. The abstract title and author names with affiliations are entered into the submission system in separate fields.

Organizing committee:

Marie-Claire Beaulieu, Tufts University
Gregory Crane, Tufts and Leipzig
Stella Dee, University of Leipzig
Leonard Muellner, Brandeis University
Maxim Romanov, Tufts University
David A. Smith, Northeastern University
David Neel Smith, College of the Holy Cross

Funded PhD, spacial technology and NE Archaeology, FH Mainz

August 12th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

The following funded PhD studentship has been advertised at the Institute for Spatial Information and Surveying Technology at the University of Applied Sciences Mainz (Technik FH Mainz).

The position is funded by the DFG/ANR project TEXTE LSEM (2014 – 2017) investigating the application of Semantic Web and related technologies to support archaeological and philological research in reconstructing the historic geography of Mesopotamia in the 2nd mill. BC.
[…]
Your primary field of work will be the exploration and application of semantically modelling archaeological site information and webbased visualisation solutions, investigating the potential of querying distributed information systems for integrating philological and archaeological knowledge. The project involves European universities from France and Germany (Paris, Dijon, Berlin, Munich, Mainz).

Full details: http://bit.ly/textelsem