EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 28-May 1, 2014

January 13th, 2014 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital editing of epigraphic and papyrological texts, to be held in the Institute of Classical Studies, London, April 28-May 1, 2014. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), Simona Stoyanova (Leipzig) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object descriptions in TEI, as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email charlotte.tupman@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday February 21st, 2014.

CFP: Digital Classicist London seminar series 2014

January 6th, 2014 by Simon Mahony

The Digital Classicist London seminars have since 2006 provided a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital and other quantitative methods. The seminars, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies, are on Friday afternoons from June to mid-August in Senate House, London.

We welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. We welcome high-quality papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, but also accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists, and should have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend).

To submit a proposal for consideration, email an abstract of approximately 500 words to s.mahony@ucl.ac.uk by midnight UTC on March 16th, 2014. (Note new deadline.)

Further information and details of past seminars are available at: www.digitalclassicist.org/wip

Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series (LOFTS)

December 16th, 2013 by Greta Franzini

The Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig is pleased to announce a new effort within the Open Philology Project: the Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series (LOFTS).

The Leipzig Open Fragmentary Texts Series is a new effort to establish open editions of ancient works that survive only through quotations and text re-uses in later texts (i.e., those pieces of information that humanists call “fragments”).

As a first step in this process, the Humboldt Chair announces the Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG) Project, whose goal is to produce a digital edition of the five volumes of Karl Müller’s Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (FHG) (1841-1870), which is the first big collection of fragments of Greek historians ever realized.

For further information, please visit the project website at: http://www.dh.uni-leipzig.de/wo/open-philology-project/the-leipzig-open-fragmentary-texts-series-lofts/

Volunteers with excellent Latin sought

December 8th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

Ostrakon from Bu Njem

A few volunteers have started gathering for an interesting project, and it occurs to me that others may like to join us. This might be especially appropriate to someone with excellent Latin, a love for the subject, but no current involvement with the classics, and some spare time on their hands. A retired Latin teacher might fit the bill, or someone who completed an advanced classics degree some years ago, but now works in an unrelated field and misses working with ancient texts. Current students and scholars are also more than welcome to participate.

The Papyri.info site includes some 52,000 transcribed texts, of which about 2,000 in Latin, very few translated into English or any other modern language. The collaborative editing tool SoSOL (deployed at papyri.info/editor) allows users to add to or improve existing editions of papyrological texts, for example by adding new translations.

If you think you might like to take part in this exercise, take a look for instance at O. Bu Njem, a corpus of 150 ostraka from the Roman military base at Golas in Libya. The Latin texts (often fragmentary) are already transcribed; do you think you could produce an English translation of a few of these texts, which will be credited to you? Would you like a brief introduction to the SoSOL interface to enable you to add the translations yourself (pending approval by the editorial board)?

Publishing Text for a Digital Age

December 6th, 2013 by Greta Franzini

March 27-30, 2014
Tufts University
Medford MA
perseus_neh (at) tufts.edu
http://sites.tufts.edu/digitalagetext/2014-workshop/

Call for contributions!

As a follow-on to Working with Text in a Digital Age, an NEH-funded Institute for Advanced Technologies in the Digital Humanities and in collaboration with the Open Philology Project at the University of Leipzig, Tufts University announces a two-day workshop on publishing textual data that is available under an open license, that is structured for machine analysis as well as human inspection, and that is in a format that can be preserved over time. The purpose of this workshop is to establish specific guidelines for digital publications that publish and/or annotate textual sources from the human record. The registration for the workshop will be free but space will be limited. Some support for travel and expenses will be available. We particularly encourage contributions from students and early-career researchers.

Textual data can include digital versions of traditional critical editions and translations but such data also includes annotations that make traditional tasks (such as looking up or quoting a primary source) machine-actionable, annotations that may build upon print antecedents (e.g., dynamic indexes of places that can be used to generate maps and geospatial visualizations), and annotations that are only feasible in a digital space (such as alignments between source text and translation or exhaustive markup of morphology, syntax, and other linguistic features).

Contributions can be of two kinds:

  1. Collections of textual data that conform to existing guidelines listed below. These collections must include a narrative description of their contents, how they were produced and what audiences and purposes they were designed to serve.
  2. Contributions about formats for publication. These contributions must contain sufficient data to illustrate their advantages and to allow third parties to develop new materials.

All textual data must be submitted under a Creative Commons license. Where documents reflect a particular point of view by a particular author and where the original expression should for that reason not be changed, they may be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All other contributions must be distributed under a CC-BY-SA license. Most publications may contain data represented under both categories: the introduction to an edition or a data set, reflecting the reasons why one or more authors made a particular set of decisions, can be distributed under a CC-BY-ND license. All data sets (such as geospatial annotation, morphosyntactic analyses, reconstructed texts with textual notes, diplomatic editions, translations) should be published under a CC-BY-SA license.

Contributors should submit abstracts of up to 500 words to EasyChair. We particularly welcome abstracts that describe data already available under a Creative Commons license. 

Dates:

January 1, 2014:  Submissions are due. Please submit via EasyChair.

January 20, 2014:  Notification.

DCSB 2013/2014: programme now online

October 7th, 2013 by mromanello

We are glad to announce to the community that this year’s #DigiClass Berlin seminar programme has now been published:

All seminars will be video recorded and the videos, as well as the slides, will be available from the programme page.

Digital Humanities in new lecture series on history and pubs

August 21st, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

A new lecture series on history of beer/wine/pubs is starting in London, and the inaugural paper, 18:00 on August 28th,  is from Digital Humanities scholar Harvey Quamen explaining why databases, prosopography and digital mapping are useful for the scholar of the history of brewing (an argument that can of course be extended to all modern history, and for that matter ancient). From the original announcement:

Three major questions—all difficult to answer—prompt this talk:

  1. what caused the sudden demise of porter around 1820?
  2. how did the style called India Pale Ale spread so rapidly?
  3. can we locate the historical London breweries?

Although surrounded in some mystery, these questions might be answerable using some techniques from the digital humanities. In particular, building a database of historical recipes will help us understand the movement and growth of beer styles (especially as those styles moved through homebrewing) and we can begin to track master-apprenticeship relationships with the use of propopographies, databases that serve as “collective biographies” of groups of people. Finally, using historical maps (like the Agas map digitized at the Map of Early Modern London project), we might begin to reconstruct the historical distribution of beer around the capital.

The series will focus on archaeology and history, so more future papers may be of more direct interest to the #DigiClass community too.

Postdoc Research Fellowship in Trier, Germany

August 21st, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

Seems like two out of three jobs we see advertized in Digital Humanities these days are in Germany (even not counting the recent mass recruitment at Greg Crane’s new shop in Leipzig!), which is both great news for everyone in this field, and a little bit sobering for those us seeing many of our best students and colleagues heading off that way.

The latest announcement comes from Trier (via Laura Löser on the MARKUP list), of a one year DH postdoctoral position at the Kompetenzzentrum there. See http://kompetenzzentrum.uni-trier.de/files/6713/7596/2062/Ausschreibung_Postdoktorandenstipendium.pdf for the full details. Note the closing date is in about three weeks time.

Digital Classicist London Videocasts

August 16th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

The videocasts for all the 2013 Digital Classicist London summer seminars are now available online at the Seminar Programme page. Each presentation is available as a downloadable or streamable video (MP4), or, for those who prefer audio, as MP3. Slideshows have also been made available in PDF format, although these are generally included in the video as well. Users can receive updates to the series, including videos from the London, Berlin, and occasional other seminars, by subscribing to the Seminar RSS Feed, or following @Stoaorg on Twitter.

Many thanks to our excellent videographer Wilma Stefani for filming and editing the videos, and to all our speakers for permission to share their presentations and slides.

(Thanks also to Christina Kamposiori, Simona Stoyanova and Valeria Vitale who helped with the organization and management of the seminars every week.)

Getty Joins Open Content Movement

August 15th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

The Getty Museum and research institute have just announced the launch of their Open Content Program, under which they intend to publish as many of their digital resources as they are legally able. In the first instance, they are release high quality digital images of all the public domain works in their collections: 4,600 photographs so far, including a few hundred of their classical sculptures, vases, and other artefacts. (A search for “Greek” within the open content images returns 261 results, and “Roman” 231.)

There is no specific common license attached to these images, but the text says they are re-usable “for any purpose” and without restriction; the objects are in the public domain, and the Getty does not assert copyright on the photographs. (I’ve only found a small number of photographs of inscriptions so far, but I’ll keep hunting!) And I very much hope many more images get added to this collection as the copyright status of further objects is resolved.

I look forward to hearing about innovative, open, and unrestricted projects, mashups, and publications that arise from this.

Last call for abstracts: Leipzig eHumanities seminar

August 8th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar established a forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

Read the rest of this entry »

EpiDoc Latest Release (8.17)

August 8th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Scott Vanderbilt has just announced the latest release of the EpiDoc Guidelines, Schema, and Example Stylesheets.

Details are available on the Latest Release page of the EpiDoc wiki at SourceForge.

Digital Humanities conferences, 1989-2013

July 17th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

It’s recently been announced that the DH conference in 2015 will be held at the University of Sydney, the first time it has ever been held outside the axis of North America and northern Europe. It’s been as far south as Tempe Arizona and as far east as Oulu, Finland; I’ve plotted this little Google Map to show the distribution, which is simultaneously impressive within its borders, and staggeringly insular from a global perspective.


View DH footprint in a larger map

I hope this means that in 2015 we’ll see more South- and East- Asian and southern African as well as antipodean scholars able to attend the conference for the first time. In the name of ADHO’s current policies of greater inclusiveness, I applaud this extension of our borders.

Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

July 11th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Posted by Marco Büchler to the Digital Classicist List:

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (3:15 PM – 4:45 PM) from October until end of January at the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in an online volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by August, 15th, 2013 to seminar@e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements will be sent by the end of August.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar@e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):

  • Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing Group),
  • Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
  • Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
  • Klaus-Peter Fähnrich (Super Computing Centre),
  • Christian Fandrych (German as a Foreign Language Group),
  • Sabine Griese (Medieval German Studies);
  • Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing),
  • Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation Group),
  • Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).

Job: lecturer in Digital Humanities, Leuven

June 22nd, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

A full-time, tenure-track, academic post (research and teaching) in the digital humanities has been advertised at KU Leuven. From the jobsite:

We are looking for a candidate with a PhD in one of the Arts Faculty’s fields of cultural scholarship (history, literature, fine arts, musicology, archaeology, area studies) or in Digital Humanities and whose research shows substantial expertise in the application of digital techniques.. The candidate is expected to further develop a prominent profile in the interdisciplinary field of Digital Humanities. The research focus must be methodological, with an emphasis on data-analysis and the visualisation of large corpora using qualitative methods and meaning investigation. The candidate actively keeps up with international developments in digital media and technologies. The candidate is required to apply for research funding in the area of Digital Humanities, notably but not exclusively in the Horizon 2020 framework, in cooperation with diverse research units in the Arts Faculty. The candidate is expected to publish in internationally recognised Digital Humanities journals as first author, and to contribute to mainstream journals in various Arts Faculty disciplines as co-author.

Full details and instructions for applying at: https://icts.kuleuven.be/apps/jobsite/vacatures/52493650?lang=en

Perseus Catalog Released

June 21st, 2013 by Tom Elliott

From Lisa Cerrato via the Digital Classicist List:

The Perseus Digital Library is pleased to announce the 1.0 Release of the Perseus Catalog.

The Perseus Catalog is an attempt to provide systematic catalog access to at least one online edition of every major Greek and Latin author (both surviving and fragmentary) from antiquity to 600 CE. Still a work in progress, the catalog currently includes 3,679 individual works (2,522 Greek and 1,247 Latin), with over 11,000 links to online versions of these works (6,419 in Google Books, 5,098 to the Internet Archive, 593 to the Hathi Trust). The Perseus interface now includes links to the Perseus Catalog from the main navigation bar, and also from within the majority of texts in the Greco-Roman collection.

The metadata contained within the catalog has utilized the MODS and MADS standards developed by the Library of Congress as well as the Canonical Text Services and CTS-URN protocols developed by the Homer Multitext Project.  The Perseus catalog interface uses the open source Blacklight Project interface and Apache Solr. Stable, linkable canonical URIs have been provided for all textgroups, works, editions and translations in the Catalog for both HTML and ATOM output formats. The ATOM output format provides access to the source CTS, MODS and MADS metadata for the catalog records. Subsequent releases will make all catalog data available as RDF triples.

Other major plans for the future of the catalog include not only the addition of more authors and works as well as links to online versions but also to open up the catalog to contributions from users. Currently the catalog does not include any user contribution or social features other than standard email contact information but the goal is to soon support the creation of user accounts and the contribution of recommendations, corrections and or new metadata.

The Perseus Catalog blog features documentation, a user guide, and contact information as well as comments from Editor-in-Chief Gregory Crane on the history and purpose of the catalog.

The Perseus Digital Library Team
contact: perseus_catalog@tufts.edu

CFP: Digital Classicist Berlin

June 20th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Proposals with abstracts for the winter 2013/2014 Digital Classicst Seminar Berlin are due September 1, 2013. See the full Digital Classicist Berlin call for papers for instructions.

Job at Cologne: Professor of ArchaeoInformatics / Computational archaeology

June 13th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Posted for Michael Heinzelmann:

Professor of ArchaeoInformatics / Computational archaeology (W2)

The Institute of Archaeology of the University of Cologne invites applications for a Full Professorhip in ArchaeoInformatics / computational archaeology (pay grade W2). The starting date for this position is October 1st, 2014.

We seek a distinguished faculty member in the position of a full professor for ArchaeoInformatics / computational archaeology and as director of the Institute’s Digital Archaeology Laboratory. Candidate’s scientific focus is in one or more of the following fields: databases, geographic information systems, CAD-, 3D-Modelling. Relevant experience in usage and development of methods in information technology methods is preconditioned. The archaeological focus should be in Classical / Mediterranean archaeology. The successful candidate will have profound knowledge in research and teaching. Applicants should be internationally recognized for leadership and scholarship in their discipline.

Duties will be to head the Digital Archaeology Laboratory and to provide intellectual and administrative leadership for the Institute of Archaeology and its activities as well as interdisciplinary research and teaching in Classics. Cooperation with regional, national and international research facilities is mandatory.

The position is open to candidates with Ph.D and habilitation or equivalent achievement in  Classical or Mediterranean archaeology.

The University of Cologne is an equal opportunities employer. Preference will be given to suitably qualified women or persons with disabilities, all other considerations being equal.

For further information please contact: Prof. Michael Heinzelmann (email: michael.heinzelmann(at)uni-koel.de).

Letter of application, CV,  list of publications, list of given lectures and diplomas (please do not send any original documents) to be sent to

Den Dekan der Philosophischen Fakultät der Universität zu Köln,
Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Köln.

Closing date is June 30th, 2013.

Digital.Humanities @ Oxford Summer School

June 10th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Noted on the Digital Classicist list:

The Digital.Humanities @ Oxford Summer School (DHOxSS) is an annual event for anyone working in the Digital Humanities. This year’s Summer School will be held on 8 – 12 July, at the University of Oxford. If you are a researcher, project manager, research assistant, or student of the Humanities, this is an opportunity for you to learn about the tools and methodology of digital humanities, and to make contact with others in your field. You will be introduced to topics spanning from creating, managing, analysing, modelling, visualizing, to publication of digital data for the Humanities. Visit http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/2013/ for more information.

With the DHOxSS’s customisable schedule, you book on one of our five-day workshops, and supplement this by booking several guest lectures from experts in their fields.

The main five-day training workshops this year are:

1. Cultural Connections: exchanging knowledge and widening participation in the Humanities
2. How to do Digital Humanities: Discovery, Analysis and Collaboration
3. A Humanities Web of Data: publishing, linking and querying on the semantic web.
4. An Introduction to XML and the Text Encoding Initiative
5. An Introduction to XSLT for Digital Humanists

There are a variety of evening events including a peer-reviewed poster session to give delegates a chance to demonstrate their work to the other delegates and speakers. The Thursday evening sees an elegant drinks reception and three-course banquet at historic Queen’s College, Oxford! (Well worth it!)

DHOxSS is a collaboration for Digital.Humanities @ Oxford between the University of Oxford’s IT Services, the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC), the Bodleian Libraries, and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities.

If you have questions, then email us at courses@it.ox.ac.uk for answers.
More details at: http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/2013/

James Cummings,
Director of DHOxSS

CFP: Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions

June 7th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Noted on the Antiquist list:

CALL FOR PAPERS
Practical Experiences with CIDOC CRM and its Extensions (CRMEX)

http://www.ontotext.com/CRMEX

26th September 2013 in Valetta, Malta

A workshop affiliated with the 17th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL 2013)

http://www.tpdl2013.info/

Background and Objectives

The CIDOC CRM (international standard ISO 21127:2006) is a conceptual model and ontology with a fundamental role in many data integration efforts in the Digital Libraries and Cultural Heritage (CH) domain. It has spawned various CRM-compliant extensions, such as:

  • Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBRoo) for works and bibliographic data -
  • CRM Digitization (CRMdig) for digitization and provenance
  • CRM for English Heritage (CRMEH) for archaeology
  • British Museum Ontology (BMO) for museum objects
  • Sharing Ancient Wisdoms (SAWS) for medieval gnomologia (collections of wise sayings)
  • PRESSoo, a FRBRoo extension for serial publications Read the rest of this entry »

CFP: CAA2014 Paris Conference

June 4th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Seen on the Antiquist list:

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

You are warmly invited to take part in the CAA2014 Paris Conference, which will be held at the “Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne – Institut d’art et d’archéologie” 3 rue Michelet, 75006 Paris, France, from 22th to 25th April 2014.

The CAA (Computers Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology) is an international congress which has taken place every year for 40 years, the last being in Australia. This conference usually brings together hundreds of participants and works on the principle of parallel sessions and workshops or roundtables. Read the rest of this entry »

Seminar: Hestia 2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

June 4th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Via Leif Isaksen on the Digital Classicist list:

Dear all,

The AHRC-funded Hestia project is pleased to announce “Hestia2:
Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources”, a one-day seminar
on spatial network analysis and linked data in Classical studies,
archaeology and cultural heritage.

The seminar will be held at The University of Southampton on 18 July.
Registration for this event is free, but we do recommend registering
as early as possible since the number of available places is limited.
More information, including abstracts and registration, can be found
via the following link: http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/hestia-2013/

We are looking forward to welcoming you to Southampton!

Elton Barker, Stefan Bouzarovski, Leif Isaksen and Tom Brughmans Read the rest of this entry »

Open Book Digital Humanities Series

June 4th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Via Roberto Rosselli Del Turco on the Digital Classicist list:

Open Book Publishers is proud to announce the launch of a Digital Humanities Series. The series is overseen by an international board of experts and its books subjected to rigorous peer review. Its objective is to encourage and support the development of experimental monographs, edited volumes and collections that extend the boundaries of the field and help to strengthen its interrelations with the other disciplines of the arts, humanities and beyond. We are also interested in introductory guides for non-specialists, best practices guides for practitioners and “state of the art” surveys. The Series will offer digital humanists a dedicated venue for high-quality, Open Access publication.

Proposals in any area of the Digital Humanities are invited. For further details and instructions on how to submit please see
http://www.openbookpublishers.com/section/29/1/digital-humanities

Editorial Board

Paul Arthur, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Julia Flanders, Gary Hall, Brett
Hirsch, Matthew, L. Jockers, John Lavagnino, Willard McCarty, Roberto
Rosselli Del Turco and Elke Teich.

Open Book Publishers

Open Book is an independent academic publisher, run by scholars who are committed to making high-quality research available to readers around the world. We publish monographs and textbooks in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and offer the academic excellence of a traditional press, with the speed, convenience and accessibility of digital publishing. All our books are available to read for free online. To date we have 30 books in print, over 215,000 visits to these books via the Web and readers from over 125 countries. See http://www.openbookpublishers.com/ for more information.

Lecture: Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models

June 4th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Via Simon Mahony:

The first of this Summer’s Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies seminars is this Friday.

Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton)
‘Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models’

Friday June 7 at 16:30
Room G37, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Are lines of sight between Roman towns important for explaining their location? Through a case study on visibility patterns between urban settlements in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain, this paper will discuss how Exponential Random Graph Models (ERGM) can help explore hypothetical past processes of interaction and site location. With these models the frequency of certain subnetworks in random networks and the empirically attested network is compared, to examine the probability that the subnetworks might have emerged through random processes. This paper will critically evaluate the potential and limitations of such an approach for archaeology.

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

All are welcome

The full 2013 programme is at <http://digiclass.cch.kcl.ac.uk/wip/wip2013.html>

Job: British Library paid internship: digital mapping and medieval cartography

June 4th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Seen on the Antiquist list:

Date: Fri, 31 May 2013 16:29:52 +0100
From: KC Kowal <kckowal@GOOGLEMAIL.COM>
Subject: Internship: Virtual Mappa Research Associate

A part-time, 12-month, paid internship opportunity is available at the British Library. It would be ideal for a graduate student interested equally in digital mapping technologies for humanities research and medieval cartography.

Funded by a Digital Humanities Implementation Grant, DM: From Annotation to Dissemination dm.drew.edu<https://gs10.globalsuccessor.com/britishlibrary/dm.drew.edu>, is an exciting new project combining medieval research with the latest digital tools. The British Library is a partner in this project and is pleased to be able to host a research intern at the London St Pancras site.

In liaison with the Virtual Mappa Project Team, the Research Associate will work within the Cartographic and Topographical Materials section towards development of content and tools. He/she will create metadata and annotations for map and textual content; assist in design of templates and schemas; generate linked data, and identify external web resources (e.g. other digital repositories, database resources, bibliographic items). Working closely with and under the guidance of the Project Team with testing of new functionality, he/she will contribute to producing the project’s public face – a website virtually collecting the core group of maps and displaying various layers of annotations by different users or groups of users.

To read the full job description and to apply please see https://gs10.globalsuccessor.com/fe/tpl_britishlibrary01.asp?newms=sr Note that the closing date for this post is 16 June. Applicants must have the right to work in the UK.

Kimberly C. Kowal
Lead Curator, Digital Mapping
The British Library
96 Euston Rd.
London NW1 2DB
Tel: +44 (0)20 7412 7849