Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3)

May 8th, 2013 by Hugh Cayless

Colleagues:

We are very pleased to announce the creation of the Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3), a new Digital Classics R&D unit embedded in the Duke University Libraries, whose start-up has been generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Duke University’s Dean of Arts & Sciences and Office of the Provost.

The DC3 goes live 1 July 2013, continuing a long tradition of collaboration between the Duke University Libraries and papyrologists in Duke’s Department of Classical Studies. The late Professors William H. Willis and John F. Oates began the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri (DDbDP) more than 30 years ago, and in 1996 Duke was among the founding members of the Advanced Papyrological Information System (APIS). In recent years, Duke led the Mellon-funded Integrating Digital Papyrology effort, which brought together the DDbDP, Heidelberger Gesamtverzeichnis der Griechischen Papyrusurkunden Ägyptens (HGV), and APIS in a common search and collaborative curation environment (papyri.info), and which collaborates with other partners, including Trismegistos, Bibliographie Papyrologique, Brussels Coptic Database, and the Arabic Papyrology Database.

The DC3 team will see to the maintenance and enhancement of papyri.info data and tooling, cultivate new partnerships in the papyrological domain, experiment in the development of new complementary resources, and engage in teaching and outreach at Duke and beyond.

The team’s first push will be in the area of Greek and Latin Epigraphy, where it plans to leverage its papyrological experience to serve a much larger community. The team brings a wealth of experience in fields like image processing, text engineering, scholarly data modeling, and building scalable web services. It aims to help create a system in which the many worldwide digital epigraphy projects can interoperate by linking into the graph of scholarly relationships while maintaining the full force of their individuality.

The DC3 team is:

Ryan BAUMANN: Has worked on a wide range of Digital Humanities projects, from applying advanced imaging and visualization techniques to ancient artifacts, to developing systems for scholarly editing and collaboration.

Hugh CAYLESS: Has over a decade of software engineering expertise in both academic and industrial settings. He also holds a Ph.D. in Classics and a Master’s in Information Science. He is one of the founders of the EpiDoc collaborative and currently serves on the Technical Council of the Text Encoding Initiative.

Josh SOSIN: Associate Professor of Classical Studies and History, Co-Director of the DDbDP, Associate editor of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies; an epigraphist and papyrologist interested in the intersection of ancient law, religion, and the economy.

 

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013

May 2nd, 2013 by Simon Mahony

The programme for the Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2013 is now published (the abstracts will be added very soon). Please circulate this via your networks. We have, for several years, been recording these seminars and making the audio files available on our seminar webpage. This year we will be recording video and so presentation slides, audio and video files will be available after each seminar.

The programme flyer can be downloaded as a PDF.

All seminars are on Fridays at 16:30 at Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU.

  • June 7: Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton) Exploring visibility networks in Iron Age and Roman Southern Spain with Exponential Random Graph Models
  • June 14: Valeria Vitale (King’s College London) An Ontology for 3D Visualization in Cultural Heritage
  • June 21: Tom Cheesman (University of Swansea) Putting Translations To Work: TransVis
  • June 28: Adrian Ryan (University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa) Quantifying stylistic distance between Athenian vase-paintings
  • July 5: Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania) The Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance: a federated platform for discovery and research
  • July 12: 16:30: Eleni Bozia (University of Florida) The Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project
    17:30: Greta Franzini (University College London) A catalogue of digital editions: Towards an edition of Augustine’s City of God
  • July 19: Federico Boschetti ( ILC-CNR, Pisa) & Bruce Robertson (Mount Allison, Canada) An Integrated System For Generating And Correcting Polytonic Greek OCR
  • July 26: Marie-Claire Beaulieu (Tufts University) Teaching with the Perseids Platform: Tools and methods
  • August 2: Neel Smith (College of the Holy Cross) Scholarly reasoning and writing in an automatically assembled and tested digital library
  • August 9: Agnes Thomas, Francesco Mambrini & Matteo Romanello (DAI, Berlin) Insights in the World of Thucydides: The Hellespont Project as a research environment for Digital History

Classical Association 2014: Call for Papers: ‘New Approaches to e-Learning in Classics’

May 1st, 2013 by Bartolo Natoli

Following on from wide interest shown in this topic at the Classical Association 2013 Conference, it is proposed that similar panels on e-Learning be convened for CA 2014. Papers are sought on topics relating to the use of e-learning in Classical subjects, including Latin, Greek, Classical Civilisation and Ancient History. The organisers are keen to encourage the submission of papers presenting the innovative use of new technologies, as well as discussion papers on the current state of theory and practice in e-Learning for Classics. The scope of this panel covers the educational sector as a whole, from Primary level through to Higher Education.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words will need to be submitted for consideration by the end of August. Please contact panel organiser Bartolo Natoli by email (bnatoli@utexas.edu) or tweet/DM (@banatoli) if you would like to be involved.

HESTIA2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

April 25th, 2013 by Simon Mahony

Copied from the Digital Classicist list on behalf of the organisers:

CALL FOR PAPERS

HESTIA2: Exploring spatial networks through ancient sources

University of Southampton 18th July 2013
Organisers: Elton Barker, Stefan Bouzarovski, Leif Isaksen and Tom Brughmans, in collaboration with The Connected Past
http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/

A free one-day seminar on spatial network analysis in archaeology, history, classics, teaching and commercial archaeology.

Spatial relationships are everywhere in our sources about the past: from the ancient roads that connect cities, or ancient authors mentioning political alliances between places, to the stratigraphic contexts archaeologists deal with in their fieldwork. However, as datasets about the past become increasingly large, these spatial networks become ever more difficult to disentangle. Network techniques allow us to address such spatial relationships explicitly and directly through network visualisation and analysis. This seminar aims to explore the potential of such innovative techniques for research, public engagement and commercial purposes.

The seminar is part of Hestia2, a public engagement project aimed at introducing a series of conceptual and practical innovations to the spatial reading and visualisation of texts. Following on from the AHRC-funded “Network, Relation, Flow: Imaginations of Space in Herodotus’s Histories” (Hestia: http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/hestia/ ), Hestia2 represents a deliberate shift from experimenting with geospatial analysis of a single text to making Hestia’s outcomes available to new audiences and widely applicable to other texts through a seminar series, online platform, blog and learning materials with the purpose of fostering knowledge exchange between researchers and non-academics, and generating public interest and engagement in this field.

For this first Hestia2 workshop we welcome contributions addressing any of (but not restricted to) the following themes:

Spatial network analysis techniques
Spatial networks in archaeology, history and classics
Techniques for the discovery and analysis of networks from textual sources
Exploring spatial relationships in classical and archaeological sources
The use of network visualisations and linked datasets for archaeologists active in the commercial sector and teachers
Applications of network analysis in archaeology, history and classics

Please email proposed titles and abstracts (max. 250 words) to:
t.brughmans@soton.ac.uk by May 13th 2013.

Report on Digital Classics panel, Classical Association 2013

April 17th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

(Report by Bartolo Natoli on the digital classics panel, April 6, 2013.)

Last week, I had the privilege of participating in the Classical Association Annual Conference at the University of Reading, UK. One of the panels that I attended struck me as particularly intriguing and important in today’s world of Higher Education: the Digital Classics panel. In fact, at the same time at which the CA Conference was occurring, the first annual Digital Classics Association Conference was happening at the University of Buffalo, a fact that further underlines the growing importance of this emerging side of Classics. Read the rest of this entry »

Report on e-learning panel, Classical Association 2013

April 6th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

(Report by Bartolo Natoli on the e-learning panel, April 5, 2013.)

Earlier today, the Classical Association’s Annual Conference, hosted by the University of Reading, presented two panels on ‘New Approaches to e-Learning’, a topic of growing interest in Classical Studies. The two panels boasted papers full of insights and suggestions for incorporating educational technology into both Latin and Classical Civilization classes. The first panel, consisting of papers by Jonathan Eaton and Alex Smith, focused more on how technology could be employed in classroom instruction on a macro-level. Eaton’s talk provided examples of how Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) could be used to enhance student learning and touched on the controversial topic of massive open online courses (MOOCs). Eaton suggested that VLEs be used to offer resources to students asynchronically, whereas evaluation and direct instruction be employed in a f2f setting: blended learning was a key means of maximizing learning potential. An example of such blended learning was Alex Smith’s discussion of using technology to provide students with collaborative and higher-level learning activities based on synthesis through the creation of a website in eXeLearning that was based on set lines of Latin. Students worked through both Latin content and 21st century, real-world skills such as collaboration and web design. Technology provided the medium, but was not the goal. Read the rest of this entry »

Open Philology Project Announced

April 4th, 2013 by Tom Elliott

Via Marco Büchler, Greg Crane has just posted “The Open Philology Project and Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at Leipzig” at Perseus Digital Library Updates.

Abstract: The Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig sees in the rise of Digital Technologies an opportunity to re-assess and re-establish how the humanities can advance the understanding of the past and to support a dialogue among civilizations. Philology, which uses surviving linguistic sources to understand the past as deeply and broadly as possible, is central to these tasks, because languages, present and historical, are central to human culture. To advance this larger effort, the Humboldt Chair focuses upon enabling Greco-Roman culture to realize the fullest possible role in intellectual life. Greco-Roman culture is particularly significant because it contributed to both Europe and the Islamic world and the study of Greco-Roman culture and its influence thus entails Classical Arabic as well as Ancient Greek and Latin. The Humboldt Chair inaugurates an Open Philology Project with three complementary efforts that produce open philological data, educate a wide audience about historical languages, and integrate open philological data from many sources: the Open Greek and Latin Project organizes content (including translations into Classical Arabic and modern languages); the Historical Language e-Learning Project explores ways to support learning across barriers of language and culture as well as space and time; the Scaife Digital Library focuses on integrating cultural heritage sources available under open licenses.

Details of the project, its components, and rationale are provided in the original post.

Possible Jobs in Digital Humanities at Leipzig

February 16th, 2013 by Simon Mahony

I picked up this announcement from the Perseus Digital Library

Possible Jobs in Digital Humanities at Leipzig

The Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities and Department of Computer Science at the University of Leipzig is looking for candidates for two possible collaborating research groups, one focused on reinventing scholarly communication for Greek and Latin, as a case study for historical languages in general, with the other helping the University Library develop methods to manage and visualize billion of words and associated annotations of many kinds. Details of the funding are being finalized but positions will ideally start in May 2013 and with an initial one year contract that could be extended to a second year that could include one semester residence at a US university. Read the rest of this entry »

Bursaries available for London EpiDoc training, April 2013

February 7th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

A reminder that we are inviting applications for a training event in digital encoding of epigraphy and papyrology at the Institute for Classical Studies, London, April 22-5, 2013 (see full announcement). Thanks to the generosity of the British Epigraphy Society and Society for Promotion of Roman Studies, we now have a limited number of bursaries available to assist students with attending this workshop.

If you would like to apply for financial support in attending the EpiDoc workshop, please note in your application email that you would like to be considered for a bursary, approximately how much you expect the trip to cost you, and what other sources of funding you have. If you have already applied for the training, please just send an additional email asking to be considered, and we’ll add a note to this effect to your application. A decision will be made shortly after the closing date on March 1st.

Digital Classicist London 2013: Call for Papers

January 24th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

The Digital Classicist London seminar series, which provides a forum for research into the ancient world that employs digital research methods, invites submissions for Summer 2013.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, semantics and linguistics, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, information science and serious gaming, although this list is by no means exhaustive. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects and their immediate context, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in ancient studies. Presentations should have an academic research agenda relevant both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information specialists or digital humanists.

The seminars will run on Friday afternoons at 16:30, from June to early August in the Institute of Classical Studies, Senate House, London. There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but please enquire if you’re coming from further afield).

To submit a paper for consideration for the Digital Classicist London Seminars, please email an abstract of 300-500 words to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk, by midnight UTC on March 22nd, 2013.

More information will be found at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2013.html

EpiDoc Workshop, London, April 22-25, 2013

January 11th, 2013 by Gabriel Bodard

We invite applications for a 4-day training workshop on digital text-markup for epigraphic and papyrological editing, to be held in the Institute for Classical Studies, London and supported by the British Epigraphy Society and Society for Promotion of Roman Studies. The workshop will be taught by Gabriel Bodard (KCL), James Cowey (Heidelberg), Simona Stoyanova (KCL) and Charlotte Tupman (KCL). There will be no charge for the teaching, but participants will have to arrange their own travel and accommodation.

EpiDoc (epidoc.sf.net) is a set of guidelines for using TEI XML (tei-c.org) for the encoding of inscriptions, papyri and other ancient documentary texts. It has been used to publish digital projects including the Inscriptions of Aphrodisias and Tripolitania, the US Epigraphy Project, Vindolanda Tablets Online and Curse Tablets from Roman Britain, Pandektis (inscriptions of Macedonia and Thrace), and the Duke Databank of Documentary Papyri. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of XML and markup and give hands-on experience of tagging textual features and object description in EpiDoc as well as use of the tags-free Papyrological Editor (papyri.info/editor).

No technical skills are required to apply, but a working knowledge of Greek or Latin, epigraphy or papyrology and the Leiden Conventions will be assumed. The workshop is open to participants of all levels, from graduate students to professors or professionals.

To apply for a place on this workshop please email gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk with a brief description of your reason for interest and summarising your relevant skills and background, by Friday March 1st, 2013.

Diccionario Griego-Español online

December 21st, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Sabine Arnaud-Thuillier:

The members of the Diccionario Griego-Español project (DGE, CSIC, Madrid) are pleased to announce the release of DGE online (http://dge.cchs.csic.es/xdge/), first digital edition of the published section (α-ἔξαυος) of our Lexicon. Although still in progress, the DGE, written under the direction of Prof. F.R. Adrados, is currently becoming the largest bilingual dictionary of ancient Greek: it already includes about 60,000 entries and 370,000 citations of ancient authors and texts. Simultaneously, we are releasing the edition of LMPG online(http://dge.cchs.csic.es/lmpg/), the digital version of the Lexicon of Magic and Religion in the Greek Magical Papyri, written by Luis Muñoz Delgado (Supplement V of DGE). The digitization of this smaller Lexicon is considered as a successful prototype of this ambitious digitization initiative: further on DGE online will be improved with similar advanced features, such as the implementation of a customized search engine. Any critics and suggestions on that matter will be very welcome. We hope these new open access dictionaries will be of your interest and will become, to some extent, valuable tools for Ancient Greek studies.

Juan Rodríguez Somolinos (Main Researcher) and Sabine Arnaud-Thuillier (responsible for the digital edition)
juan.rodriguez@cchs.csic.es
sabine.thuillier@cchs.csic.es

Workshop on Canonical Text Services: Furman May 19-22, 2013

December 18th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Posted for Christopher Blackwell:

What · With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Furman University’s Department of Classics is offering a workshop on the Canonical Text Services Protocol.

When · May 19 – 22, 2013.

Where · Greenville, South Carolina, (Wikipedia); Furman University.

Who · Applications will be accepted from anyone interested in learning about exposing canonically cited texts online with CTS. We have funds to pay for travel and lodging for six participants.

How · Apply by e-mail to christopher.blackwell@furman.edu by January 31, 2013.

For more information, see http://folio.furman.edu/workshop.html or contact christopher.blackwell@furman.edu

RA Job: The Art of Making in Antiquity (King’s College London)

December 10th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Research Assistant position, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London

The Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London is looking for a highly motivated individual to work on The Art of Making in Antiquity project: www.artofmaking.ac.uk

This research-led project explores the tools, techniques and working practices of Roman stone carvers through a unique set of photographic images alongside new contextual information brought together into an innovative online collection employing cutting edge digital solutions including image annotation. This position is an excellent opportunity for a postgraduate student looking for experience to help them move to more advanced research in ancient visual culture and/or the application of the digital humanities to the classical world.

This is a 6-month position and the closing date for applications is the 1st January 2013.

More details about the position and details of how to apply can be found at: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/pertra/vacancy/external/pers_detail.php?jobindex=12621

For an informal discussion of the post please contact Paul Vetch on 020 7848 1040, or via email at paul.vetch@kcl.ac.uk

Suggestions for new Greek, Latin texts? English translations?

December 6th, 2012 by gregcrane

[Please repost!]

We are preparing for a new set of texts to be entered by the data entry firm with which we work (http://www.digitaldividedata.org/). The next order will be sent in mid December but a more substantial order will be placed early in 2013.

What would you like to see added to the Perseus Digital Library, both for use within the Perseus site and for download as TEI XML under a Creative Commons license? Note that we only enter materials that are in the public domain and that can be freely redistributed for re-use by others.

Some possibilities — but please suggest other things that you find important!

* Scholia of Greek and Latin authors.

* Collections of fragmentary authors

* Sources from later antiquity (esp. Christian sources)

* More English translations

Please think about (1) individual authors and texts and (2) what you would want to see if we could do something big.

If you have individual suggestions, please write gcrane2008@gmail.com. A public discussion via the Digital Classicist would probably be the best.

Let us know what you want!

Digital Humanities developer post at KCL

November 21st, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

The Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London is advertising for a research developer to work on some of the active projects in the department.

The successful candidate for this position will have wide experience in modelling structured data and developing tools to search, query, retrieve and display them using relational databases, RDF, and related technologies; in designing, writing and modifying programs which facilitate content creation; and collaborating in the development of integrated interfaces for web publication.

Experience in creating and manipulating structured data with a range of RDB-related and web-delivery standards and technologies (SQL, SPARQL, Django/ Python, Javascript/ JQuery) is essential. Familiarity with ontologies, text processing techniques and standards-compliant XHTML and CSS is highly desirable, as is experience in the modelling of humanities data, especially that relating to manuscripts and documents.

Among other projects, the appointee is likely to contribute to the Ancient Inscriptions of the Northern Black Sea.

Full job description and application information at http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/pertra/vacancy/external/pers_detail.php?jobindex=12519

Pipiatio Classica, November 15

November 12th, 2012 by Dot Porter

Posted on behalf of José M. Ciordia (http://blog.pompilos.org):

On Thursday [November] 15 will take place a Pipiatio Classica: teachers and students of Classical Languages in Spain will write in Latin and Ancient Greek in their accounts of Twitter, in order to express their opposition to the Law Wert (an educational law detrimental to our studies) as you can read at http://www.chironweb.org/en/pipiatio-classica-2/

Everybody from anywhere is welcome to this initiative.

Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy

September 24th, 2012 by Tom Elliott

Lecture announcement: http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/news/index.html#sep27

September 27, 2012
Lecture: “Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy.” John W. Hessler, Kluge Staff Fellow.
4:00 – 5:00 p.m., LJ-119, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress. Reception to follow.

Abstract

How accurately have culturally fundamental texts from literature, law, science, geography, and philosophy been handed down from ancient Rome and Greece to the present by way of scribal copying in the Middle Ages?  This fundamental question of how various manuscripts from a textual tradition have been transmitted through space and time has been the concern of scholars since at least the founding of the great Library of Alexandria in the third century BC.

Early Medieval scribes recognized that in the process of copying ancient texts mistakes were made, and that these errors became part of the textual tradition, to be passed on through history. They also realized that this process of copying error had a random or chaotic nature, and so they invented the demon Tutivillus, whom they considered to be the error’s source. Throughout the Renaissance scholars, like Erasmus, battled this demon in their attempts to re-construct important Latin and Greek manuscripts descended from antiquity. Later in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries scholars, like Karl Lachmann and Paul Krüger, tried to systematize a method in order to determine which parts of medieval manuscripts were errors, and which were the real readings descended from the original authors.

This paper will highlight a new computational technique to show how modern digital philology is changing the way we think of the transmission of medieval manuscripts through space and time, and is also helping to solve this seemingly simple, but unfortunately, rather complicated problem. Using the notes of the classical philologist Paul Krüger, whose manuscripts were recently rediscovered in the Law Library of Congress, complex three dimensional visualization techniques will be used to show how the medieval manuscripts making up the Codex of Justinian are spatially and temporally related to each other. This talk will also highlight how these new techniques give scholars the tools to postulate what the structure of missing and destroyed manuscripts might have been.  Using these methods, based in lattice theory and information entropy, this paper can be seen as a case study in how digital and computational algorithms are changing the face of even the most traditional of the humanities, classical philology.

The results of this study and my year long Kluge Fellowship will be published in the book  called, Roman Law in Ruins: a Computational Study of the Medieval Transmission of Justinian’s Codex. This has been made possible through a generous grant from the American Academy in Rome and it will be published copyright free both in hardcover and on the web by Franz-Steiner Verlag (Berlin) in February, 2014 as part of their Alte Geschichte Monograph Series.

“Europeana’s Huge Dataset Opens for Re-use”

September 14th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

According to this press-release from Europeana Professional, the massive European Union-funded project has released 20 million records on cultural heritage items under a Creative Commons Zero (Public Domain) license.

The massive dataset is the descriptive information about Europe’s digitised treasures. For the first time, the metadata is released under the Creative Commons CC0 Public Domain Dedication, meaning that anyone can use the data for any purpose – creative, educational, commercial – with no restrictions. This release, which is by far the largest one-time dedication of cultural data to the public domain using CC0 offers a new boost to the digital economy, providing electronic entrepreneurs with opportunities to create innovative apps and games for tablets and smartphones and to create new web services and portals.

Upon registering for access to the Europeana API, developers can build tools or interfaces on this data, download metadata into new platforms for novel purposes, make money off it, perform new research, create artistic works, or anything.

It’s important to note that it’s only the metadata that is being freely released here: I did a search for some Greek inscriptions, and also photographs and transcriptions are available, these are all fiercely copyrighted to the Greek Ministry of Culture: ” As for all monuments of cultural heritage, permission from the Greek Ministry of Culture is required for the reproduction of photographs of the inscriptions.” (According to this same license statement, even the metadata are licensed: “Copyright for all data in the collection belongs to the Institute for Greek and Roman Antiquity of the National Hellenic Research Foundation. These data may be used freely, provided that there is explicit reference to their provenance. ” Which seems slightly at odds with the CC0 claim of the Europeana site; no doubt closer examination of the legal terms would reveal which claim supercedes in this case.)

(It was lovely to be reminded that inscriptions provided by the Pandektis project [like this funerary monument for Neikagoras] have text made available in EpiDoc XML as well as Leiden-formatted edition.)

It would be really good to hear about any implementations, tools or demos built on top of this data, especially if that had a classics component. Any pointers yet? Or do we need to organize a hackfest to get it started….?

BSR conference support scheme

September 13th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Eleanor Murkett:

28 September deadline for proposals for the new BSR Conference Support Scheme Competition 2013-2014

Proposals for 2013-14 are currently being accepted for the BSR’s new Conference Support Scheme. This provides support for promising novel research on Rome and Italy. The scheme reflects the BSR’s longstanding commitment to promoting interdisciplinary research and its main aim is to provide support for genuinely interdisciplinary landmark conferences which will foster collaborative relationships with universities and research centres.

Please make sure your application reaches us by the deadline of 16.00 on Friday 28 September 2012

For further information about the Scheme please go to the BSR Conferences page at http://www.bsr.ac.uk/research/conferences-at-the-bsr/bsr-conference-support-scheme

Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities, U.Houston

September 12th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Casey Dué Hackney (full details at UH website):

Postdoctoral Fellow Application Information

The University of Houston invites applications for a post-doctoral fellowship in Digital Humanities beginning January 16, 2013. The position is available for one year and renewable for a second year at the discretion of the University. We welcome candidates who hold (or will hold by January 2013) a Ph.D. in any humanities discipline, but particularly encourage applications from candidates with expertise and research in digital humanities and/or computational methods. Any applicant should have received his or her Ph.D. no earlier than 2010.

The postdoctoral fellow will be in residence at the main campus of the University of Houston. The fellow will spend 65 percent of the time coordinating the activities of the interdisciplinary Digital Humanities Initiative, including scheduling speakers, organizing and participating in mini-workshops and reading groups, developing grant applications and other funding sources with faculty and graduate students, and other appropriate tasks as assigned. There are no teaching duties but the fellow will help develop DH courses and training programs. For more information on the Digital Humanities Initiative, see http://www.uh.edu/class/digitalhumanities/. The fellow will report directly to the Associate Dean for Faculty and Research in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences. The fellow may spend the other 35 percent of the time on the fellow’s own research.

Applicants should submit their applications electronically to cdue-hackney@uh.edu. Applications should be in a pdf file that includes a cover letter, a description of the applicant’s research program in digital humanities and/or computational methods (no more than 3 single-spaced pages), and a curriculum vitae. Additionally three letters of recommendation should be sent to the same e-mail address. The deadline is October 15, 2012. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Final candidates will be invited for interviews in person or via the Internet.

Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World

September 6th, 2012 by Simon Mahony

This call for papers was picked up from the Digital Classicist mailing list.

Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World

An interdisciplinary conference organized by the Digital Classics Association

University at Buffalo, SUNY
Buffalo, NY 14261, USA

April 5 – 6, 2013

Archaeological GIS, digital historical mapping, literary text mining, and other computational techniques are increasingly shaping how we understand classical antiquity. Digital methods are breaking down sub-disciplinary barriers, allowing literary scholars to more easily explore epigraphical inscriptions, archaeologists to place their findings on digital historical maps, and philosophers to explore style and argument with sophisticated search techniques. Digital tools also offer new ways to explain aspects of classical antiquity in the classroom and to the public at large.

The aim of the inaugural Digital Classics Association (DCA) conference is to provide a survey of current approaches to digital methods of research, teaching, and outreach across classical sub-disciplines, with the goals of further opening inter-disciplinary perspectives and establishing common objectives for digital research and education. Read the rest of this entry »

3 Jobs for DH developers, London

September 4th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

From Jobs.ac.uk:

The Department of Digital Humanities (DDH) is an academic department in the School of Arts and Humanities at King’s College London. Formerly called the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, DDH is an international leader in the application of technology in the arts and humanities, and in the social sciences.

The primary objective of DDH is to study the possibilities of computing for arts and humanities scholarship and, in collaboration with local, national and international research partners across the disciplines, to design and build applications which implement these possibilities, in particular those which produce online research publications.

The department is looking for a number of skilled developers to join its Research and Development team. These posts all involve implementation and functional design work (in collaboration with other members of the R&D team and external partners) across two – three varied and challenging research projects.

(Note that DDH has several active classical projects, including The Art of Making in Antiquity, to which new appointees will probably contribute.)

Editing Athenaeus Hackathon: Berlin/Leipzig, October 10-12

September 1st, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

The Banquet of the Digital Scholars

Humanities Hackathon on editing Athenaeus and on the Reinvention of the Edition in a Digital Space

October 10-12, 2012 Universität Leipzig (ULEI) <http://www.zv.uni-leipzig.de/> & Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (DAI) Berlin <http://www.dainst.org/de/department/zentrale?ft=all>

Co-directors: Monica Berti – Marco Büchler – Gregory Crane – Bridget Almas

The University of Leipzig will host a hackathon that addresses two basic tasks. On the one hand, we will focus upon the challenges of creating a digital edition for the Greek author Athenaeus, whose work cites more than a thousand earlier sources and is one of the major sources for lost works of Greek poetry and prose. At the same time, we use the case Athenaeus to develop our understanding of to organize a truly born-digital edition, one that not only includes machine actionable citations and variant readings but also collations of multiple print editions, metrical analyses, named entity identification, linguistic features such as morphology, syntax, word sense, and co-reference analysis, and alignment between the Greek original and one or more later translations. Read the rest of this entry »

Job: Programmer/Analyst, TLG (Irvine, CA)

August 22nd, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Programmer/Analyst Position at the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae®

The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae Project® (TLG®) at the University of California, Irvine is currently seeking a Programmer/Analyst III to join its team.

The TLG is Digital Library of Greek Literature containing one of the largest collections of electronic text in the world and covering almost all ancient Greek literary texts from Homer (8th c. B.C.) to the 16th c. A.D. As a member of the TLG team the successful applicant will provide support and development on a variety of applications used to search and retrieve the materials comprising the TLG digital library. He/she will assist in the administration of the TLG servers (Unix) and will be responsible for the development and maintenance of security protocols.

Requirements: Working experience in designing and developing programs in high-level languages, especially Java (Javascript, Perl); proven ability to design, write, test and debug computer applications, command language scripts, and application control files; experience in relational databases and web- development tools, preferably in a Unix environment; experience or at least conceptual knowledge of text encoding methods and standards (particularly XML and Unicode); good understanding of electronic information publishing concepts and search engines; proven ability to communicate effectively with technical and non-technical staff both verbally and in writing; ability to work independently, keeping track of continuing problems and requests.

Desirable: Knowledge of Greek; experience using Apache Lucene and Solr.

Salary: Annual $59,676 – $81,162

For more details see http://www.tlg.uci.edu/news/