Suggestions for new Greek, Latin texts? English translations?

December 6th, 2012 by gregcrane

[Please repost!]

We are preparing for a new set of texts to be entered by the data entry firm with which we work (http://www.digitaldividedata.org/). The next order will be sent in mid December but a more substantial order will be placed early in 2013.

What would you like to see added to the Perseus Digital Library, both for use within the Perseus site and for download as TEI XML under a Creative Commons license? Note that we only enter materials that are in the public domain and that can be freely redistributed for re-use by others.

Some possibilities — but please suggest other things that you find important!

* Scholia of Greek and Latin authors.

* Collections of fragmentary authors

* Sources from later antiquity (esp. Christian sources)

* More English translations

Please think about (1) individual authors and texts and (2) what you would want to see if we could do something big.

If you have individual suggestions, please write gcrane2008@gmail.com. A public discussion via the Digital Classicist would probably be the best.

Let us know what you want!

Digital Humanities developer post at KCL

November 21st, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

The Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London is advertising for a research developer to work on some of the active projects in the department.

The successful candidate for this position will have wide experience in modelling structured data and developing tools to search, query, retrieve and display them using relational databases, RDF, and related technologies; in designing, writing and modifying programs which facilitate content creation; and collaborating in the development of integrated interfaces for web publication.

Experience in creating and manipulating structured data with a range of RDB-related and web-delivery standards and technologies (SQL, SPARQL, Django/ Python, Javascript/ JQuery) is essential. Familiarity with ontologies, text processing techniques and standards-compliant XHTML and CSS is highly desirable, as is experience in the modelling of humanities data, especially that relating to manuscripts and documents.

Among other projects, the appointee is likely to contribute to the Ancient Inscriptions of the Northern Black Sea.

Full job description and application information at http://www.kcl.ac.uk/depsta/pertra/vacancy/external/pers_detail.php?jobindex=12519

Pipiatio Classica, November 15

November 12th, 2012 by Dot Porter

Posted on behalf of José M. Ciordia (http://blog.pompilos.org):

On Thursday [November] 15 will take place a Pipiatio Classica: teachers and students of Classical Languages in Spain will write in Latin and Ancient Greek in their accounts of Twitter, in order to express their opposition to the Law Wert (an educational law detrimental to our studies) as you can read at http://www.chironweb.org/en/pipiatio-classica-2/

Everybody from anywhere is welcome to this initiative.

Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy

September 24th, 2012 by Tom Elliott

Lecture announcement: http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/news/index.html#sep27

September 27, 2012
Lecture: “Chasing Krüger’s Dream: Studying the Transmission of Classical and Medieval Manuscripts Using Lattice Theory and Information Entropy.” John W. Hessler, Kluge Staff Fellow.
4:00 – 5:00 p.m., LJ-119, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress. Reception to follow.

Abstract

How accurately have culturally fundamental texts from literature, law, science, geography, and philosophy been handed down from ancient Rome and Greece to the present by way of scribal copying in the Middle Ages?  This fundamental question of how various manuscripts from a textual tradition have been transmitted through space and time has been the concern of scholars since at least the founding of the great Library of Alexandria in the third century BC.

Early Medieval scribes recognized that in the process of copying ancient texts mistakes were made, and that these errors became part of the textual tradition, to be passed on through history. They also realized that this process of copying error had a random or chaotic nature, and so they invented the demon Tutivillus, whom they considered to be the error’s source. Throughout the Renaissance scholars, like Erasmus, battled this demon in their attempts to re-construct important Latin and Greek manuscripts descended from antiquity. Later in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries scholars, like Karl Lachmann and Paul Krüger, tried to systematize a method in order to determine which parts of medieval manuscripts were errors, and which were the real readings descended from the original authors.

This paper will highlight a new computational technique to show how modern digital philology is changing the way we think of the transmission of medieval manuscripts through space and time, and is also helping to solve this seemingly simple, but unfortunately, rather complicated problem. Using the notes of the classical philologist Paul Krüger, whose manuscripts were recently rediscovered in the Law Library of Congress, complex three dimensional visualization techniques will be used to show how the medieval manuscripts making up the Codex of Justinian are spatially and temporally related to each other. This talk will also highlight how these new techniques give scholars the tools to postulate what the structure of missing and destroyed manuscripts might have been.  Using these methods, based in lattice theory and information entropy, this paper can be seen as a case study in how digital and computational algorithms are changing the face of even the most traditional of the humanities, classical philology.

The results of this study and my year long Kluge Fellowship will be published in the book  called, Roman Law in Ruins: a Computational Study of the Medieval Transmission of Justinian’s Codex. This has been made possible through a generous grant from the American Academy in Rome and it will be published copyright free both in hardcover and on the web by Franz-Steiner Verlag (Berlin) in February, 2014 as part of their Alte Geschichte Monograph Series.

“Europeana’s Huge Dataset Opens for Re-use”

September 14th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

According to this press-release from Europeana Professional, the massive European Union-funded project has released 20 million records on cultural heritage items under a Creative Commons Zero (Public Domain) license.

The massive dataset is the descriptive information about Europe’s digitised treasures. For the first time, the metadata is released under the Creative Commons CC0 Public Domain Dedication, meaning that anyone can use the data for any purpose – creative, educational, commercial – with no restrictions. This release, which is by far the largest one-time dedication of cultural data to the public domain using CC0 offers a new boost to the digital economy, providing electronic entrepreneurs with opportunities to create innovative apps and games for tablets and smartphones and to create new web services and portals.

Upon registering for access to the Europeana API, developers can build tools or interfaces on this data, download metadata into new platforms for novel purposes, make money off it, perform new research, create artistic works, or anything.

It’s important to note that it’s only the metadata that is being freely released here: I did a search for some Greek inscriptions, and also photographs and transcriptions are available, these are all fiercely copyrighted to the Greek Ministry of Culture: ” As for all monuments of cultural heritage, permission from the Greek Ministry of Culture is required for the reproduction of photographs of the inscriptions.” (According to this same license statement, even the metadata are licensed: “Copyright for all data in the collection belongs to the Institute for Greek and Roman Antiquity of the National Hellenic Research Foundation. These data may be used freely, provided that there is explicit reference to their provenance. ” Which seems slightly at odds with the CC0 claim of the Europeana site; no doubt closer examination of the legal terms would reveal which claim supercedes in this case.)

(It was lovely to be reminded that inscriptions provided by the Pandektis project [like this funerary monument for Neikagoras] have text made available in EpiDoc XML as well as Leiden-formatted edition.)

It would be really good to hear about any implementations, tools or demos built on top of this data, especially if that had a classics component. Any pointers yet? Or do we need to organize a hackfest to get it started….?

BSR conference support scheme

September 13th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Eleanor Murkett:

28 September deadline for proposals for the new BSR Conference Support Scheme Competition 2013-2014

Proposals for 2013-14 are currently being accepted for the BSR’s new Conference Support Scheme. This provides support for promising novel research on Rome and Italy. The scheme reflects the BSR’s longstanding commitment to promoting interdisciplinary research and its main aim is to provide support for genuinely interdisciplinary landmark conferences which will foster collaborative relationships with universities and research centres.

Please make sure your application reaches us by the deadline of 16.00 on Friday 28 September 2012

For further information about the Scheme please go to the BSR Conferences page at http://www.bsr.ac.uk/research/conferences-at-the-bsr/bsr-conference-support-scheme

Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities, U.Houston

September 12th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Forwarded for Casey Dué Hackney (full details at UH website):

Postdoctoral Fellow Application Information

The University of Houston invites applications for a post-doctoral fellowship in Digital Humanities beginning January 16, 2013. The position is available for one year and renewable for a second year at the discretion of the University. We welcome candidates who hold (or will hold by January 2013) a Ph.D. in any humanities discipline, but particularly encourage applications from candidates with expertise and research in digital humanities and/or computational methods. Any applicant should have received his or her Ph.D. no earlier than 2010.

The postdoctoral fellow will be in residence at the main campus of the University of Houston. The fellow will spend 65 percent of the time coordinating the activities of the interdisciplinary Digital Humanities Initiative, including scheduling speakers, organizing and participating in mini-workshops and reading groups, developing grant applications and other funding sources with faculty and graduate students, and other appropriate tasks as assigned. There are no teaching duties but the fellow will help develop DH courses and training programs. For more information on the Digital Humanities Initiative, see http://www.uh.edu/class/digitalhumanities/. The fellow will report directly to the Associate Dean for Faculty and Research in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences. The fellow may spend the other 35 percent of the time on the fellow’s own research.

Applicants should submit their applications electronically to cdue-hackney@uh.edu. Applications should be in a pdf file that includes a cover letter, a description of the applicant’s research program in digital humanities and/or computational methods (no more than 3 single-spaced pages), and a curriculum vitae. Additionally three letters of recommendation should be sent to the same e-mail address. The deadline is October 15, 2012. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. Final candidates will be invited for interviews in person or via the Internet.

Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World

September 6th, 2012 by Simon Mahony

This call for papers was picked up from the Digital Classicist mailing list.

Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World

An interdisciplinary conference organized by the Digital Classics Association

University at Buffalo, SUNY
Buffalo, NY 14261, USA

April 5 – 6, 2013

Archaeological GIS, digital historical mapping, literary text mining, and other computational techniques are increasingly shaping how we understand classical antiquity. Digital methods are breaking down sub-disciplinary barriers, allowing literary scholars to more easily explore epigraphical inscriptions, archaeologists to place their findings on digital historical maps, and philosophers to explore style and argument with sophisticated search techniques. Digital tools also offer new ways to explain aspects of classical antiquity in the classroom and to the public at large.

The aim of the inaugural Digital Classics Association (DCA) conference is to provide a survey of current approaches to digital methods of research, teaching, and outreach across classical sub-disciplines, with the goals of further opening inter-disciplinary perspectives and establishing common objectives for digital research and education. Read the rest of this entry »

3 Jobs for DH developers, London

September 4th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

From Jobs.ac.uk:

The Department of Digital Humanities (DDH) is an academic department in the School of Arts and Humanities at King’s College London. Formerly called the Centre for Computing in the Humanities, DDH is an international leader in the application of technology in the arts and humanities, and in the social sciences.

The primary objective of DDH is to study the possibilities of computing for arts and humanities scholarship and, in collaboration with local, national and international research partners across the disciplines, to design and build applications which implement these possibilities, in particular those which produce online research publications.

The department is looking for a number of skilled developers to join its Research and Development team. These posts all involve implementation and functional design work (in collaboration with other members of the R&D team and external partners) across two – three varied and challenging research projects.

(Note that DDH has several active classical projects, including The Art of Making in Antiquity, to which new appointees will probably contribute.)

Editing Athenaeus Hackathon: Berlin/Leipzig, October 10-12

September 1st, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

The Banquet of the Digital Scholars

Humanities Hackathon on editing Athenaeus and on the Reinvention of the Edition in a Digital Space

October 10-12, 2012 Universität Leipzig (ULEI) <http://www.zv.uni-leipzig.de/> & Deutsches Archäologisches Institut (DAI) Berlin <http://www.dainst.org/de/department/zentrale?ft=all>

Co-directors: Monica Berti – Marco Büchler – Gregory Crane – Bridget Almas

The University of Leipzig will host a hackathon that addresses two basic tasks. On the one hand, we will focus upon the challenges of creating a digital edition for the Greek author Athenaeus, whose work cites more than a thousand earlier sources and is one of the major sources for lost works of Greek poetry and prose. At the same time, we use the case Athenaeus to develop our understanding of to organize a truly born-digital edition, one that not only includes machine actionable citations and variant readings but also collations of multiple print editions, metrical analyses, named entity identification, linguistic features such as morphology, syntax, word sense, and co-reference analysis, and alignment between the Greek original and one or more later translations. Read the rest of this entry »

Job: Programmer/Analyst, TLG (Irvine, CA)

August 22nd, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Programmer/Analyst Position at the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae®

The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae Project® (TLG®) at the University of California, Irvine is currently seeking a Programmer/Analyst III to join its team.

The TLG is Digital Library of Greek Literature containing one of the largest collections of electronic text in the world and covering almost all ancient Greek literary texts from Homer (8th c. B.C.) to the 16th c. A.D. As a member of the TLG team the successful applicant will provide support and development on a variety of applications used to search and retrieve the materials comprising the TLG digital library. He/she will assist in the administration of the TLG servers (Unix) and will be responsible for the development and maintenance of security protocols.

Requirements: Working experience in designing and developing programs in high-level languages, especially Java (Javascript, Perl); proven ability to design, write, test and debug computer applications, command language scripts, and application control files; experience in relational databases and web- development tools, preferably in a Unix environment; experience or at least conceptual knowledge of text encoding methods and standards (particularly XML and Unicode); good understanding of electronic information publishing concepts and search engines; proven ability to communicate effectively with technical and non-technical staff both verbally and in writing; ability to work independently, keeping track of continuing problems and requests.

Desirable: Knowledge of Greek; experience using Apache Lucene and Solr.

Salary: Annual $59,676 – $81,162

For more details see http://www.tlg.uci.edu/news/

Job: Programmer and Digital Humanist: Buddhist Manuscripts (Munich)

August 20th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Programmer and Digital Humanist (full‐time)
Buddhist Manuscripts from Gandhāra

Unit: Faculty for Cultural Studies (Institute of Indology and Tibetology)
Start Date: 1 October 2012
Application Deadline: 31 August 2012
Salary: TV-L E 13 payscale (between 3,187 and 4,599 euros per month depending on experience)
Term of appointment: until 31 December 2015, with the possibility of renewal

Part‐time employment is possible in principle.

The Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) is one of the most renowned and largest universities of Germany.

Job Description

You will be responsible for the technical maintenance and development of the Dictionary of Gāndhārī database. Read the rest of this entry »

CfP: Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin 2012/2013

August 8th, 2012 by mromanello

(German version below)

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the newly established Digital Classicist Seminar Berlin, which will run for the first time in the Winter Term 2012. This initiative, inspired by and connected to London’s Digital Classicist Work in Progress Seminar, is organised in association with the German Archaeological Institute and the Excellence Cluster TOPOI.

We invite submissions on research which employ digital methods, resources or technologies in an innovative way in order to enable increased understanding of the ancient world at large. Abstracts, either in English or in German, of 300-500 words max. (bibliographic references excluded) should be uploaded by midnight MET on September 14, 2012 using the special submission form.

Themes may include digital text, linguistics technology, image processing and visualisation, linked data and semantic web, open access, spatial and network analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. We welcome seminar proposals addressing the application of these methods to individual projects, and particularly contributions which show how the digital component can lead to crossing disciplinary boundaries and answer new research questions. Seminar content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, as well as information scientists and digital humanists, with an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of these fields.

Seminars will run fortnightly on Tuesday evenings (17:00-18:30) starting in October 2012 in the TOPOI Building Dahlem, hosted by the Excellence Cluster TOPOI. The full programme will be finalised and announced in late September. It is planned to grant an allowance to speakers for travelling and accommodation costs. Further details will be available once the program is finalised. Read the rest of this entry »

London Digital Classicist Seminars

May 8th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Digital Classicist & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar, Summer 2012

Fridays at 16:30 in Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

June 1 Chiara Salvagni (KCL), Digital Critical Editions of Homer G37
June 8 Jari Pakkanen (RHUL), Pattern detection in archaeological data: quantum modelling, Bronze Age Aegean lead weights and Greek Classical Doric architecture G37
June 15 Angeliki Chrysanthi (Southampton), A visitor-sourced methodology for the interpretation of archaeological sites Court Room
June 22 Alejandro Giacometti, Lindsay MacDonald (UCL) & Alberto Campagnolo (University of the Arts), Cultural Heritage Destruction: Documenting Parchment Degradation via Multispectral Imaging G37
June 29 Marco Buchler & Gregory Crane (Leipzig), Historical Text Re-use Detection on Perseus Digital Library G37
July 6 Charlotte Tupman (KCL), Digital epigraphy beyond the Classical: creating (inter?)national standards for recording modern and early modern gravestones G22/26
July 13 Maggie Robb (KCL), Digitising the Prosopography of the Roman Republic G37
July 20 Paolo Monella (Centro Linceo, Rome), In the Tower of Babel: modelling primary sources of multi-testimonial textual transmissions G37

ALL WELCOME

The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact Gabriel.Bodard@kcl.ac.uk, Stuart.Dunn@kcl.ac.uk or S.Mahony@ucl.ac.uk, or see the seminar website at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2012.html

Official Release of the Virtual Research Environment TextGrid

April 27th, 2012 by Mark Lauersdorf

TextGrid (http://www.textgrid.de) is a platform for scholars in the humanities, which makes possible the collaborative analysis, evaluation and publication of cultural remains (literary sources, images and codices) in a standardized way. The central idea was to bring together instruments for the dealing with texts under a common user interface. The workbench offers a range of tools and services for scholarly editing and linguistic research, which are extensible by open interfaces, such as editors for the linkage between texts or between text sequences and images, tools for musical score edition, for gloss editing, for automatic collation etc.

On the occasion of the official release of TextGrid 2.0 a summit will take place from the 14th to the 15th of May 2012. On the 14th the summit will start with a workshop day on which the participants can get an insight into some of the new tools. For the following day lectures and a discussion group are planned.

For more information and registration see this German website:

http://www.textgrid.de/summit2012

With kind regards

Celia Krause


Celia Krause
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Institut für Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaft
Hochschulstrasse 1
64289 Darmstadt
Tel.: 06151-165555

Digital Classicist London 2012: Call for Papers

March 23rd, 2012 by Simon Mahony

This is a reminder of the approaching deadline (April 1st) for abstracts for this summer’s Digital Classicist seminar series.
Full details are on the earlier post and the Digital Classicist website.

CFP: TEI Annual Meeting

March 21st, 2012 by Hugh Cayless

Call for papers and proposals

TEI and the C(r|l)o(w|u)d
2012 Annual Conference and Members’ Meeting of the TEI Consortium
Texas A&M University, Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture

  • Deadline for submissions: May 15, 2012
  • Meeting dates: Wed 7 November to Sat 10 November, 2012
  • Workshop dates: Mon 5 November to Wed 7 November, 2012 (see separate call)

The Programme Committee of the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Text Encoding
Initiative (TEI – www.tei-c.org) Consortium invites individual paper proposals, panel sessions, poster sessions, and tool demonstrations particularly, but
not exclusively, on digital texts, scholarly editing or any topic that applies TEI to its research.

Read the rest of this entry »

Conference on the Use of New Technologies in Archaeology, Puget Sound, Oct. 25-28, 2012

February 21st, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Taking Archaeology Digital

A Conference on the Use of New Technologies in Archaeology

University of Puget Sound, Oct. 25-28, 2012

Technology is changing our world in ways that previous centuries could not have imagined, and it is a constant struggle for us to keep up with these frequent changes and innovations.  While archaeology is a very old practice, only in the later 20th century was it given serious methodological consideration, and now, in the 21st century, this explosion in the availability of technological tools offers the potential to transform the practice of archaeology.  But the mere existence of a new tool, no matter how fun and exciting it might seem, does not necessarily translate into good use of that tool. This is the theme we hope to address in the upcoming Redford Conference in Archaeology at the University of Puget Sound, October 25-28, 2012.

We invite proposals for papers and presentations that explore the question of how archaeologists can best make use of the vast range of possibilities that technology opens up.  We are particularly interested in presentations from people who may have already had some experiences in trying to fit new technologies into archaeological practice. Often those who study the past have had difficulty adapting their practice to the existence of new tools, and one goal is to help us learn from the experiences of others. Read the rest of this entry »

OAPEN-UK focus groups, first report

February 3rd, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

The JISC-funded OAPEN-UK (Open Access Publishing in European Networks) project have published a report on the first round of focus groups, held in the British Library late last year. Various groups of stakeholders (in this case academics who author research material) were brought together to discuss issues surrounding open access monograph publication. The conclusions and recommendations are perhaps less radical (or more practical?) than some discussions of open publication in this venue, but the report still raises some valuable issues. (Full disclosure, I participated in this session.)

The report can be found at: http://oapen-uk.jiscebooks.org/research-findings/y1-initial-focus-groups/authors-readers/

Job: Digital Archivist at ADS

February 2nd, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Particularly appropriate for a digital classicist or archaeologist with an interest in digital preservation and a high level of computer skills (from University of York jobs):

The Archaeology Data Service (ADS) has a vacancy for a Digital Archivist for a fixed term of two years, commencing immediately.

The post will involve accessioning, mounting, and indexing of data collections, validation of data and conversion into preferred formats; curation and migration of digital collections; design and development of user interfaces; and discussion and data audits with data depositors.

You should have a first degree or postgraduate qualification in archaeology and/or computer science, and you should possess an exceptionally high level of ICT skills.

Digital Classicist London 2012: Call for Papers

January 24th, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

The annual Digital Classicist London seminar series on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component will run again in Summer 2012.

We warmly welcome contributions from students as well as from established researchers and practitioners. Themes could include digital text, linguistics technology, imaging and visualization, linked data, open access, geographic analysis, serious gaming and any other digital or quantitative methods. While we welcome high-quality application papers discussing individual projects, the series also hopes to accommodate broader theoretical consideration of the use of digital technology in Classical studies. The content should be of interest both to classicists, ancient historians or archaeologists, and to information scientists or digital humanists, and have an academic research agenda relevant to at least one of those fields.

The seminars will run on Friday afternoons (16:30-18:00) from June to mid-July in Senate House, London, hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (ending early this year to avoid clashing with the Olympic Games). In previous years collected papers from the seminars have been published in a special issue of Digital Medievalist; a printed volume from Ashgate Press; a BICS supplement (in production). The last few years’ papers have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

There is a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

To submit a paper for consideration for the Digital Classicist London Seminars, please email an abstract of 300-500 words to gabriel.bodard@kcl.ac.uk, by midnight UTC on April 8th, 2012.

More information will be found at http://www.digitalclassicist.org/wip/wip2012.html

Guide to Evagrius Ponticus

January 17th, 2012 by Tom Elliott

This just in from Joel Kalvesmaki:

I am pleased to announce the appearance of the Guide to Evagrius Ponticus, a digital-only, peer-reviewed reference work about the fourth-century monastic theologian. Updated quarterly, it provides definitive, integrated lists of Evagrius’s works, of editions and translations of those works, and of studies related to his life and thought. The Guide also includes a sourcebook of key ancient testimonies to Evagrius and his reception, in English translation, as well as a checklist of images from the ancient world.

The Guide takes relatively new approaches to open-access academic publishing in the digital humanities [ed: cc-nc-sa], and so is anticipated to develop over the coming years. Future editions will include a manuscript checklist, images of manuscripts, transcriptions of those manuscripts, and open-source critical editions of Evagrius’s writings.

http://evagriusponticus.net/

(For a more complete experience, read the Guide on a browser other than Internet Explorer.)

Linked Ancient World Data Institute at NYU (Spring 2012)

January 12th, 2012 by Tom Elliott

New York University’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) will host the Linked Ancient World Data Institute (LAWDI) from May 31st to June 2nd, 2012 in New York City. “Linked Open Data” is an approach to the creation of digital resources that emphasizes connections between diverse information on the basis of published and stable web addresses (URIs) that identify common concepts and individual items. LAWDI, funded by the Office of Digital Humanities of the National Endowment for Humanities, will bring together an international faculty of practitioners working in the field of Linked Data with twenty attendees who are implementing or planning the creation of digital resources.

More information, including a list of faculty, and application instructions are available at the LAWDI page on the Digital Classicist wiki.

Working with Text in a Digital Age, RFP

January 3rd, 2012 by Gabriel Bodard

Tufts University invites applications to “Working with Text in a Digital Age”, a three-week NEH Institute for Advanced Technology in the Digital Humanities (July 23-August 10, 2012) that combines traditional topics such as TEI Markup with training in methods from Information Retrieval, Visualization, and Corpus and Computational Linguistics. Faculty, graduate students, and library professionals are encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit proposals by February 15, 2012. Participant proposals must include CVs and statements of purpose (no more than 1,000 words) describing how they will be able to use participation in the Institute to advance their subsequent careers. Participants must be committed to collaborative work and to publication of results from this Institute under a Creative Commons license. Participants should identify source materials with which they propose to work during the Institute and which must be in the public domain or available under a suitable license. In an ideal case, source materials would include both texts for intensive analysis and annotation and one or more larger corpora to be mined and analyzed more broadly. Statements of purpose must describe initial goals for the Institute. For more information or to submit applications, please contact lcerrato@perseus.tufts.edu.

We particularly encourage participants who are committed to developing research agendas that integrate contributions and research by undergraduates, that expand the global presence of the Humanities, and that, in general, broaden access to and participation in the Humanities. Preference will be given to participants who are best prepared not only to apply new technologies but to do so as a means to transform their teaching and research and the relationship of their work to society beyond academia.

Postdoc in Digital Humanities: University of Alabama

November 28th, 2011 by Tom Elliott

The Alabama Digital Humanities Center at the University of Alabama (http://www.lib.ua.edu/digitalhumanities) is pleased to invite applications for a post-doctoral fellowship in Digital Humanities. The fellowship offers the successful candidate a unique platform for professional advancement: financial and material support for independent research combined with the opportunity to play an instrumental role in nurturing the growing digital humanities community at the University of Alabama.

See the full announcement here.