Job vacancy: Research Associate, Centre for e-Research at King’s College London

June 18th, 2011 by Simon Mahony

Saw this job listing publicised on Antiquist and Humanist and copying it here.

Research Associate at King’s College London, Centre for e-Research

The Centre for e-Research is seeking a Research Associate with strong technical and software development skills to work on e-research projects at the Centre. These projects may result in case studies, proofs of concept and pilots as well as in software for operational service, so the post offers an exciting opportunity to contribute both to the development of the digital and research infrastructure at King’s and its collaborators, and to more exploratory development of innovative ideas solutions using cutting edge approaches. The post-holder will be expected to publish the results of research undertaken in relevant journals. Some current and past projects may be found at

Approximately 75% of the post-holder’s work (on average over the 2 years of the appointment) will be dedicated to the SAWS (Sharing Ancient Wisdoms) project, an EU-funded international collaboration that is exploring ways of exploiting the digital environment for creating, publishing and interacting with selected digital collections of manuscripts and texts, specifically Greek and Arabic “wisdom literature”. These anthologies of wise or useful sayings were widely circulated throughout antiquity and the middle ages, and they raise particular challenges at a technical and information modelling level due to the complex network of interrelationships among them and among their component parts. The SAWS project requires an imaginative research associate capable of researching, devising and developing innovative methodologies and tools for creating these complex resources, for expressing relationships between them, and for publishing, visualising and exploring them. The remaining 25% will be spent on other projects at the Centre, depending on ongoing requirements and the interests of the appointee.

The candidate will preferably have an education in information science or computer science, or a humanities degree with a strong technical component. Due to the exploratory nature of the work, the role will require problem-solving ability and a high degree of initiative, as well as flexibility and a keenness to learn. Knowledge of Java, web development technologies (e.g. XML, Django, Ajax) and web service technologies is essential. Experience of linked data/semantic web technologies (e.g. RDF, OWL), and of other programming languages (e.g. Python, Ruby), would be an advantage.

This is a full-time position, initially for a period of 24 months. Salary for the position will be at an appropriate point of Grade 6, currently £33,193 to £39,185 per annum (inclusive of a £2,323 London allowance). Benefits include a contributory final salary pension scheme, subsidised gym membership and 27 days of annual leave, 4 college closure days, plus public holidays.

For more details and an application pack please see Alternatively, please email strand-recruitment[@] All correspondence should clearly state the job title and reference number G6/QLJ/408/11-JT. For an informal discussion of the post please contact Mark Hedges on mark.hedges[@], or 020 7848 1970.

The closing date is: 12 July 2011

Institute of Classical Studies Digital seminars 2011

May 12th, 2011 by Gabriel Bodard

The programme for the summer 2011 Institute of Classical Studies digital seminars has been released.

Fridays at 16:30 in Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

June 3: Kathryn Piquette and Charles Crowther (Oxford), Developing a Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) System for Inscription Documentation in Museum Collections and the Field: Case studies on ancient Egyptian and Classical material (Room 37)

June 10: David Scott and Mike Jackson (Edinburgh University), Supporting Productive Queries for Research (SPQR): Aggregating Classical Datasets with Linked Data (Room 37)

June 17: Charlotte Roueché and Charlotte Tupman (King’s College London), Sharing Ancient Wisdoms: developing structures for charting textual transfer (Room 37)

June 24: Alessandro Vatri (Oxford University), HdtDep: a treebank and search engine for Greek word order study (Court Room)

July 1: Agiatis Benardou (Digital Curation Unit, R.C. “Athena”), Classical Studies facing digital research infrastructures: From practice to requirements (Court Room)

July 8: Timothy Hill (New York University), Semantics and Semantic Constructs in Cultural Comparison: The Case of Late Antiquity (Court Room)

July 15: Elton Barker (Open University) and Leif Isaksen (Southampton), Mine the GAP: Finding ancient places in the Google Books corpus (Court Room)

July 22: Sandra Blakely (Emory), Modeling the mysteries: GIS technology, network models, and the cult of the Great Gods of Samothrace (Court Room)

July 29: Marco Büchler (Leipzig), Bringing Modern Spell Checking Approaches to Ancient Texts: Automatized Suggestions for Incomplete Words (Room 37)

August 5: Daniel Pett (British Museum), The Portable Antiquities Scheme: a tool for studying the Ancient landscape of England and Wales (Room 37)

August 12: Valentina Asciutti and Stuart Dunn (King’s College London), Digital diasporas: remaking cultural heritage in cyberspace (Room 37)


The seminar will be followed by wine and refreshments.

For more information please contact, or The seminars will be podcast shortly after each event; follow the RSS feed.

Digital Classicist panels at the 2011 Classical Association Conference (UK)

April 7th, 2011 by Simon Mahony

The Digital Classicist community are presenting two panels at the coming 2011 Classical Association Annual Conference (UK).

The full programme is available from the conference website.

The 2011 Classical Association Annual Conference will be hosted by Durham University. The conference involves around 50 panels with a distinguished array of international and national speakers, and is attended by several hundred delegates. The conference will run from the evening of Friday 15th April until lunch on Monday 18th April.

The two Digital Classicist panels are:
Ancient Space, Linked Data and Digital Research (chair: Gabriel Bodard, King’s College London)
Teaching and Publication of Classics in the Internet Age (chair: Simon Mahony, University College London).

In addition Durham Classics and Ancient History are hosting a Digital Classicist Training Day on Friday April 15. There will be a morning session on Generic Web Tools, and an afternoon one introducing participants to the Papyrological Editor. Note that attendance at the training day needs to be booked separately.

Workshop on Digital Humanities and the Study of Religion in Antiquity

April 6th, 2011 by Tom Elliott

From Michael Satlow at Brown University. Please direct all questions to him.

FEBRUARY 13-14, 2012

The Program in Judaic Studies in collaboration with the Brown University Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship is pleased to announce plans for a two-day workshop devoted to investigating the ways in which the digital humanities has or can change the study of religion in antiquity. The workshop will take place on February 13-14, 2012, at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

We invite proposals for papers and presentations that explore the intersection of ancient religion and the digital humanities. We are particularly interested in presentations of projects that have the potential to open up new questions and avenues of research. Can digital tools not only allow us to do our work faster and more thoroughly but also enable entirely new kinds of research? How might different digital data (e.g., textual, geographic, and material culture) be used together most productively? The workshop will concentrate primarily on research rather than directly on pedagogy or scholarly communication. One session will be devoted to “nuts and bolts” issues of funding and starting a digital project.

The focus of the workshop will be on the religions of West Asia and the Mediterranean basin through the early Islamic period. Proposals relating to other regions, however, will also be considered.

More and updated information can be found at:

Please submit proposals of up to 300 words by October 31, 2011, to Michael Satlow (

Stoa Consortium Temporary Downtime and Services Outage

April 6th, 2011 by Ryan Baumann

On March 29th, 2011, the main server for suffered a hardware failure. Unfortunately, this led to an extended period of downtime for sites and projects hosted on the Stoa. We have now set up a temporary server, and are working to restore sites and services to it from tape backup, while we also look into a long-term solution for replacing the original server. Please bear with us while we work to restore the site, and thank you for your patience.

Triennial Conference, University of Cambridge

March 28th, 2011 by Dot Porter

Registration open for Triennial Conference, University of Cambridge, 25-28 July 2011

Hosted by the Faculty of Classics, the Celebration of Classics will see a remarkable line up of international scholars brought together in a novel format for such an event. There will, of course, be some very distinguished plenary lecturers, and there will also be two outreach evenings with well-known figures from the media and literary world. But the centre of the event is a set of seminars where leading classicists will be presenting their cutting edge work in a seminar format with extensive opportunities for discussion (each paper will have at least 45 minutes for comment and questions). Each day has only two such seminar slots, leaving plenty of time for debate as well as meeting old and new friends. We are hoping that you will want to come to Cambridge and participate in this event.

For more information about the conference please go to

Professor Stephen Oakley

Chair, Organising Committee

Linking Open Data: the Pelagios Ontology Workshop

March 18th, 2011 by Gabriel Bodard

(To register to attend this workshop, please visit

The Pelagios workshop is an open forum for discussing the issues associated with and the infrastructure required for developing methods of linking open data (LOD), specifically geodata. There will be a specific emphasis on places in the ancient world, but the practices discussed should be equally applicable to contemporary named locations. The Pelagios project will also make available a proposal for a lightweight methodology prior to the event in order to focus discussion and elicit critique.

The one-day event will have 3 sessions dedicated to:
1) Issues of referencing ancient and contemporary places online
2) Lightweight ontology approaches
3) Methods for generating, publishing and consuming compliant data

Each session will consist of several short (15 min) papers followed by half an hour of open discussion. The event is FREE to all but places are LIMITED so participants are advised to register early. This is likely to be of interest to anyone working with digital humanities resources with a geospatial component.

Preliminary Timetable
10:30-1:00 Session 1: Issues
2:00-3:30 Session 2: Ontology
4:00-5:30 Session 3: Methods

Confirmed Speakers:

Johan Alhlfeldt (University of Lund) Regnum Francorum online
Ceri Binding (University of Glamorgan) Semantic Technologies Enhancing
Links and Linked data for Archaeological Resources
Gianluca Correndo (University of Southampton) EnAKTing
Claire Grover (University of Edinburgh) Edinburgh Geoparser
Eetu Mäkelä (University of Aalto) CultureSampo
Adam Rabinowitz (University of Texas at Austin) GeoDia
Sebastian Rahtz (University of Oxford) CLAROS
Sven Schade (European Commission)
Monika Solanki (University of Leicester) Tracing Networks
Humphrey Southall (University of Portsmouth) Great Britain Historical
Geographical Information System
Jeni Tennision (

Pelagios Partners also attending are:

Mathieu d’Aquin (KMi, The Open University) LUCERO
Greg Crane (Tufts University) Perseus
Reinhard Foertsch (University of Cologne) Arachne
Sean Gillies (Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU) Pleiades
Mark Hedges, Gabriel Bodard (KCL) SPQR
Rainer Simon (DME, Austrian Institute of Technology) EuropeanaConnect
Elton Barker (The Open University) Google Ancient Places
Leif Isaksen (The University of Southampton) Google Ancient Places

ISMAR 2011: Call for Participation

February 15th, 2011 by Dot Porter

ISMAR 2011: Call for Participation
Tenth IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality
Oct. 26 – 29, 2011, Basel, Switzerland

The fields of Mixed Reality (MR) and Augmented Reality (AR) seek to interactively combine real and virtual objects and environments in 3D. The basic paradigm enables fascinating new types of user interfaces, and is beginning to show significant impact on industry and society. The field is highly interdisciplinary, and MR/AR concepts are applicable to a wide range of applications.

This year we are proud to present the 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR 2011). The symposium will be held on Oct 26–29, 2011 at Congress Center in Basel, Switzerland. We invite you all to participate in this great event for the exchange of new ideas in this exciting field! ISMAR now invites contributions in two programs: the Science & Technology (S&T) program and a complementary Arts, Media and Humanities (AMH) program.

The 2011 ISMAR Arts, Media and Humanities chairs invite artists, designers, architects, urbanists, and scholars to explore the potential of Mixed and Augmented Reality within their respective fields. We welcome artifacts, musings, probings, discourses, and insights to be presented at ISMAR 2011 in the form of papers, posters, art exhibits and performances, panels, workshops, demos, and tutorials.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, case studies, deployments, prototypes, and evaluations of Mixed and Augmented Reality in:

  • art,media art, performing arts,
  • architecture and urban design,cultural heritage,
  • design research,
  • game design,
  • product design and toys,
  • social media,
  • transhumanism,
  • and advertising and marketing.

Important Deadlines

Paper and Poster Abstracts :    May 11
Paper and Poster Submission :    May 18
Workshop Proposals : June 3
Tutorial Proposals : June 3
S&T Demonstrations : August 15
Art Exhibits: June 3
Tracking Competition: August 15

For further information, please visit the conference website:

BMCR review of Berti/Costa

February 14th, 2011 by Gabriel Bodard

In BMCR 2011-02-24 last week, Alexandra Trachsel reviews:

Monica Berti, Virgilio Costa, La Biblioteca di Alessandria: storia di un paradiso perduto. Ricerche di filologia, letteratura e storia 10. Roma: Edizioni Tored, 2010. Pp. xvi, 279. ISBN 9788888617343. €30.00 (pb).

Of particular interest to Stoans and Digital Classicists is the final section on massive digital libraries such as Google Books and Europeana, and lessons both draw (and should learn) from the ancient Library of Alexandria.

InterFace2011 Call for Talks

February 9th, 2011 by mromanello

InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly hosted by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice.

The symposium aims to foster collaboration and shared understanding between scholars in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method. With a focus on the interests and concerns of Ph.D students and early career researchers, the programme will include networking activities, opportunities for research exposition, and various training and workshop activities.

A core component of the programme will be a lightning talks session in which each participant will make a two-minute presentation on their research. The session will be lively and dynamic. Each presentation must be exactly two minutes long, making use of necessary, interesting, appropriate, or entertaining visual or sound aids, and condensing a whole Ph.D’s worth of ideas and work into this short slot.

Participants will be able to join workshops in:

  • network analysis;
  • bibliographic software;
  • data visualisation;
  • linked data.

There will be talks on:

  • user studies and social research;
  • discourse analysis in science and technology;
  • how to get your work published;
  • how to apply for research funding.

There will also be two keynote talks given by speakers whose work marks the leading edge of technology in scholarship and practice. The speakers will be:

Finally, the symposium will conclude with an unconference; a participatory, collaborative, and informal event in which the form and content is decided on by participants as it unfolds and in which discussion and production is emphasised over presentation and analysis. Participants may wish to share their own skills, learn a new skill, establish and develop a collaborative project, or hold a focused discussion.

We are now seeking applications for participation in InterFace. Applications are encouraged from Ph.D students and early career researchers in all humanities and computing disciplines. The key component of your application will be a 150-word abstract for your proposed lightening talk.

You can submit your application here:

The deadline for applications is Friday 25 February 2011.

The committee will select participants from among the applications received and successful applicants will be informed on Monday 4 April 2011. If your application is accepted, you will then be invited to register. A participation fee will be charged to cover costs of lunches, refreshments, venue, and speakers. This fee will be £35.

Key Dates:

  • Friday 25 February: Deadline for applications
  • Friday 1 April: Notification of successful applications
  • Monday 18 April: Deadline for registration for successful applicants
  • Monday 27 July: InterFace 2011 begins

We look forward to receiving your application.

The InterFace 2011 Committee

PhD Studentship: Digital Resource of Palaeography

January 25th, 2011 by Gabriel Bodard

The Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King’s College London, is pleased to announce a PhD studentship in digital palaeography funded by a European Research Council project, Digital Resource of Palaeography. The studentship is to be held in the CCH as part of a PhD in Digital Humanities.


The aim of Digital Resource of Palaeography is to bringing the methods and resources of digital humanities to bear on palaeographical exploration, citation and teaching. It involves a web resource which will allow scholars to rapidly retrieve digital images, verbal descriptions, and detailed characterisations of the writing, as well as the text in which it is found and the content and structure of the manuscript or charter. It will incorporate different ways of searching, using images, maps, timelines and image-processing as well as conventional text-based browsing and searching. The palaeographical content will focus on a case-study of vernacular English script from the eleventh century, but the project will allow scholars to test and apply new general developments in palaeographical method which have been discussed in theory but which have hitherto proven difficult or impossible to implement in practice. Some further details of the project are available on the KCL news page s.

The studentship

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Cultural Heritage Imaging workshop

January 25th, 2011 by Gabriel Bodard

You are warmly invited to attend
“Digital Transformations: New developments in cultural heritage imaging”
a workshop on digital imaging to be held at the University of Oxford on Friday, 25 February 2011.

The workshop will focus on documentary evidence, from 3D capture techniques to reflectance transformation imaging (RTI). This workshop is part of the collaborative University of Oxford and University of Southampton pilot project “Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) System for Ancient Documentary Artefacts”, supported by the AHRC DEDFI scheme.

Friday, 25 February 2011
Lecture Theatre, The Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, 66 St. Giles’, Oxford OX1 3LU
Time: tbc

For free registration, further details and any queries, please go to:

Best wishes,
The RTISAD Team:
Alan Bowman, Charles Crowther
Jacob Dahl, Graeme Earl
Leif Isaksen, Kirk Martinez
Hembo Pagi, Kathryn E. Piquette

TRAIL 2011: Training and Research in the Archaeological Interpretation of Lidar

January 24th, 2011 by Tom Elliott

From Rachel Opitz:

TRAIL 2011 Training and Research in the Archaeological Interpretation of Lidar
14-16 March 2011, European Research Centre at Bibracte, Glux-en-Glenne, France

The objective of these days is to create a forum for discussion for professionals, researchers and students who have previously worked with LiDAR or are currently involved in the preparatory or active phase of a project using LiDAR. The exchanges at this workshop aim to show the potential of the technology for archaeological applications, to discuss possibilities for coordination, method sharing and to outline research perspectives at the European level.

This workshop will be organized in two phases:

  • Two half-day sessions targeted for archaeologists who are not LiDAR specialists but who are interested in the potential archaeological applications;
  • Two half-day sessions targeting archaeologists already familiar with the technology.

Application forms and more information are available from: .

Please direct any questions to Rachel Opitz at

Digital Classicist Seminar 2011, CFP

January 24th, 2011 by Gabriel Bodard

Call for Papers

The Digital Classicist will once more be running a series of seminars in Summer 2011, on the subject of research into the ancient world that has an innovative digital component. Themes could include, but are by no means limited to, visualization, information and data linking, digital textual and linguistic studies, and geographic information and network analysis; so long as the content is likely to be of interest both to classicists / ancient historians / archaeologists and information scientists / digital humanists, and would be considered serious research in at least one of those fields.

The seminars run on Friday afternoons (16:30 – 19:00) from June to mid-August in Senate House, London, and are hosted by the Institute of Classical Studies (University of London). In previous years collected papers from the Digital Classicist seminars have been published in an online special issue of Digital Medievalist, a printed volume from Ashgate Press, a BICS supplement (in production), and the last three years have been released as audio podcasts. We have had expressions of interest in further print volumes from more than one publisher.

We have a budget to assist with travel to London (usually from within the UK, but we have occasionally been able to assist international presenters to attend, so please enquire).

Please send a 300-500 word abstract to by April 15th, 2011. We shall announce the full programme at the end of April.

(Coörganised by Will Wootton, Charlotte Tupman, Matteo Romanello, Simon Mahony, Timothy Hill, Alejandro Giacometti, Juan Garcés, Stuart Dunn & Gabriel Bodard.)

2011 Latium Vetus Program

January 18th, 2011 by Dot Porter

Posted on behalf of Monica Berti.

The 2011 Latium Vetus Program, as part of a collaborative project between Tufts University and Roma Tor Vergata, will allow students to learn the techniques of modern epigraphic study, including digital transcription and documentation of inscriptions, and they will have the unique opportunity to work on unpublished texts from the huge corpus of inscriptions of Ancient Latium and to contribute to the ongoing project of digitizing and publishing these inscriptions.

As an intensive course of first-hand epigraphic and archaeological site and museum study based at the campus of Tor Vergata University and led by Monica Berti of Roma Tor Vergata and J. Matthew Harrington of Tufts University, this program will combine close study of epigraphic remains with exploration of the archaeological contexts and analysis of relevant Latin sources from the sites of Latium and Campania: Rome, Ostia, Pompeii, Tivoli, Praeneste, Veii, Lanuvium, Albano Laziale, Cerveteri, Herculaneum, Nemi, Anzio, Tusculum, Falerii Novi, Sutri, Tarquinia, Napoli, Paestum, Lucus Feroniae, Boscoreale, Oplontis, and more …
Join us for this exciting summer program!
Application deadline: March 1, 2011

For more information, please visit

Audio-Visual Archaeology seminars

January 7th, 2011 by Gabriel Bodard

The following seminar series will be held on behalf of the Centre for Audio-Visual Studies and Practice in Archaeology at UCL Institute of Archaeology.

All welcome to attend, and drinks follow each seminar. We look forward to seeing you there.

Mondays 4-6pm, IOA 31-34 Gordon Square, London Room 612

10 Jan
Broadcast archaeology
Michael Wood (Story of England, BBC) & Ray Sutcliffe (Chronicle)

17 Jan
Producing archaeology on TV
Charles Furneaux (Kaboom Film and Television)

24 Jan
Archaeology and radio
Ben Roberts (The British Museum)

31 Jan
Using digital technology to visualise the past
Tom Goskar (Wessex Archaeology) and Stuart Eve (UCL)

7 Feb
The Google ancient places prokect
Leif Isaksen (University of Southampton)

21 Feb
Archaeology, television and the public
Tim Schadla-Hall & Chiara Bonacchi (UCL)

28 Feb
Developing digital communities
Andy Bevan and Lorna Richardson (UCL)

7 Mar
The Portable Antiquities Scheme
Dan Pett (The British Museum)

14 Mar
Archaeology, videogames and the public
Andrew Gardner (UCL)

21 Mar
Where do we go from here
Don Henson (Honorary Director of CASPAR)

Enquiries to: Tim Schadla-Hall or Chiara Bonacchi

InterFace 2011: 3rd International Symposium for Humanities and Technology

December 21st, 2010 by Simon Mahony

Posted on behalf of the organisers. I went to the first InterFace at Southampton in 2008 and it was a great event.



With apologies for cross posting.

InterFace 2011 — 27-29 July 2011, University College London

InterFace is a symposium for humanities and technology. In 2011 it is being jointly hosted by colleges across London and will be an invaluable opportunity for participants to visit this active hub of digital scholarship and practice.

The symposium aims to foster collaboration and shared understanding between scholars in the humanities and in computer science, especially where their efforts converge on exchange of subject matter and method. With a focus on the interests and concerns of Ph.D students and early career researchers, the programme will include networking activities, opportunities for research exposition, and various training and workshop activities.

The details of the workshops and training sessions are still in preparation but they are expected to include hands-on work with:

* bibliographic software;
* sound analysis for speech and music;
* data visualisation;
* user studies and social research;
* discourse analysis in the sciences, technology and the humanities;
* applying for research funding;
* getting work published;
* computer modelling.

A core component of the programme will be a lightening talks session in which each participant will make a two-minute presentation on their research. The session will be lively and dynamic. Each presentation must be exactly two minutes long, making use of necessary, interesting, appropriate, or entertaining visual or sound aids, and condensing a whole Ph.D’s worth of ideas and work into this short slot.

Finally, the symposium will conclude with an unconference; a participatory, collaborative, and informal event in which the form and content is decided on by participants as it unfolds and in which discussion and production is emphasised over presentation and analysis. Participants may wish to share their own skills, learn a new skill, establish and develop a collaborative project, or hold a focused discussion.

In January we will be seeking applications for participation in this symposium. An announcement and call for papers will be issued in the New Year.

For any general enquiries related to the symposium please email:

or see the website:

Immediate Opening: Digital Papyrology Programmer

December 13th, 2010 by Tom Elliott

This position, previously announced, has been re-opened for a 12-month tenure, beginning January 2011.

New York University

New York University’s Division of the Libraries seeks a Programmer/Analyst to work on the “Papyrological Navigator” ( and associated systems. is a web-based research portal that provides scholars worldwide with the ability to search, browse and collaboratively edit texts, transcriptions, images and metadata relating to ancient texts on papyri, pottery fragments and other material. The incumbent will work closely with the Project Coordinator and with scholars involved in the project at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, Duke University, the University of Kentucky and the University of Heidelberg, as well as with NYU Digital Library Technology staff.

The incumbent’s initial responsibilities will include: close collaboration with project team members to enhance and extend a robust production environment at NYU for the ongoing ingest and processing of new and updated text transcriptions, metadata and digital images; performing both analysis and programming of any required changes or enhancements to current PN applications.

Candidates should have the following skills:

  • Bachelor’s degree in computer or information science and 3 years of relevant experience or equivalent combination
  • Must include experience developing web applications using Java
  • Demonstrated knowledge of Java, Javascript, Tomcat, Saxon, Lucene, Apache, SQL, XML, XSLT
  • Experience with metadata standards (e.g. TEI, EpiDoc)
  • Experience working in Unix/Linux environments
  • Preferred: Experience with Apache Solr, RDF triple stores (e.g. Mulgara), Clojure
  • Preferred: Experience designing, building, and deploying distributed systems
  • Preferred: Experience working with non-Roman Unicode-based textual data (esp. Greek)
  • Excellent communication and analytical skills

Applicants should submit resume and cover letter, which reflects how applicant’s education and experience match the job requirements.

NYU offers a competitive salary and superior benefit package, which includes tuition benefits for self and eligible family members, generous vacation, medical, dental, and retirement plans. For more information about working at NYU visit our website at:

To apply:

To apply for this position online, visit

NYU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

Plutarch, Athenaeus, Elegy and Iambus, the Greek Anthology, Lucian and the Scaife Digital Library – 1.6 million words of Open Content Greek

December 13th, 2010 by gregcrane

iThe Perseus Digital Library is pleased to publish TEI XML digital editions for Plutarch, Athenaeus, the Greek Anthology, and for most of Lucian. This increases the available Plutarch from roughly 100,000 to the surviving 1,150,000 words. Athenaeus and the Greek Anthology are new within the Perseus Digital Library, with roughly 270,000 and 160,000 words of Greek. The 13,000 words for J.M. Edmonds Elegy and Iambus include both the surviving poetic quotations and major contexts in which these poems are quoted. The 200,000 words of Lucian represent roughly 70% of the surviving works attributed to that author. In all, this places more than 1.6 million words of Greek in circulation.

The Need for Open Content Source Texts

It has been a decade since we published new Greek sources. There is nothing glamorous about digitizing source texts and many other more exciting research projects to explore as Classics in particular and the Humanities in general reinvent themselves within the digital world. Nevertheless, in working with our colleagues, we have come to the conclusion that the most important desideratum for the study of Greek is a library of Greek source texts that can be used and repurposed freely. Machine-readable texts are our Genome. We have therefore undertaken to help fill this vacuum. Support from various sources – including the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Mellon Foundation, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, the UK’s Joint Information Services Council (JISC), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), and the Cantus Foundation – put us in a position where we could begin to contribute new Greek sources. A Digital Humanities Grant from Google helped complete the work published here and will allow us to release more Greek (

Our goal is not simply to provide services such as morphologically aware searching but to provide the field with Greek texts that they can reedit, annotate, and modify as they wish. We offer these texts both because they are useful as they stand but also as raw material on which students of Greek can build. We look forward to seeing versions of these texts in Chicago’s Philologic, the Center for Hellenic Studies’ First Thousand Years of Greek, and many other environments.

Creative Commons License

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Job vacancy in digital palaeography

December 7th, 2010 by Simon Mahony

Seen on Digital Medievalist and posted here.

Vacancy: Research Associate (Digital Palaeography)

The Centre for Computing in Humanities (CCH) at King’s College London seeks a suitably experienced Research Associate for a new four-year project on digital palaeography.

The post holder will be based at CCH, an academic department in the School of Arts and Humanities focusing on research into the possibilities of computing for arts and humanities scholarship. The project, ‘Digital Resource and Database of Palaeography, Manuscripts and Diplomatic’ is funded by the European Research Commission (FP7). Its primary aim is to create an online resource for palaeographical study, discovery and citation, emphasizing the vernacular scripts of eleventh-century England.

The post holder will work closely with the Principal Investigator and others in the project team to work with original manuscripts to compile palaeographical and codicological data, to prepare this data and the associated images for online delivery, to contribute to innovative ideas about the display and interrogation of palaeographical data on line, and to help disseminate the project’s findings through conferences and colloquia.

A PhD or equivalent on a relevant medieval topic involving the study of manuscripts is essential, as is an appreciation of the potentials and limits of humanities computing. A high level of skill in palaeography and codicology is required, as is working knowledge of Old English and Latin. Some experience working with XML, databases and/or digital images is desirable.

The appointment will be made, dependent on relevant qualifications and experience, within the Grade 6 scale, £33,070 inclusive of £2,323 London Allowance, per annum. Benefits include an annual season ticket loan scheme and a final salary superannuation scheme.

This post is fixed term until 30 September 2014.

For informal enquiries please contact Dr Peter Stokes at

Further details and application packs are available on the College’s website at cass-recruitment. All correspondence should clearly state the job title and reference number G6/AAV/629/10-HK

The closing date for receipt of applications is 5 January 2011

Εἰκονοποιία proceedings online

November 18th, 2010 by Gabriel Bodard

I’m delighted to see that the proceedings of last month’s conference on Digital Imaging of Ancient Textual Heritage are now online as an open access PDF.

Download from:

There was an impressive line-up at this important conference, and I was sorry not to be able to attend. This collection of papers will be incredibly useful to anyone working in the imaging of manuscripts and other textual objects. (Now if only I could also have a hardcopy for my bookshelf!)

(Thanks to for pointing this out on Twitter)

Open Access and Citation Impact

November 17th, 2010 by Gabriel Bodard

A recent study published in the Public Library of Science has tested the relationship between Open Access self-archiving of peer-reviewed articles and improved citation impact.

See: Gargouri Y et al. ‘Self-Selected or Mandated, Open Access Increases Citation Impact for Higher Quality Research’ PLoS ONE 5(10)

The correlation between publications that are freely available online and high citation metrics has been established many times before and is unarguable, but some have questioned (in what strikes me as a stretch of reasoning) whether this correlation can be taken to imply causation. (In other words, they argue, “Yeah but, maybe those open access papers are cited more because people would only upload their really good papers to the Web that would be cited a lot anyway!”) Harnad and co. demonstrate pretty conclusively using controlled and tested methods that both voluntarily self-archived papers, and those that are required by funding bodies or institutions to be openly archived, have the same beneficial impact on citation, *and* that this benefit is proportionally even greater for the most high-impact publications.

Like I say, we kind of knew this, but we now have a scientific publication we can cite to demonstrate it even to the skeptics.

Rethinking the Humanities and advancing civilization in a violent world

November 9th, 2010 by gregcrane

As we consider whether or not the Humanities serve a public good and warrant public support, we cannot emphasize enough that ideas are a matter of life and death. At the dawn of the twentieth century, Kabul and Kandahar were almost as remote from New York as the Moon is today. But in the first year of the twenty-first century, we saw that the most remote and geo-politically weak space on earth could strike the centers of global power. Pressing issues such as the anxiety over oil and Israel may be in the foreground, but these are largely accelerants to a deeper intellectual encounter, a war of ideas that have evolved over thousands of years, across thousands of miles, and within thousands of languages.

We need better ways to understand the cultures that drive economic and political systems upon which our biological lives depend. First, we need to understand the connections, often surprising, that bind superficially distinct cultures. Kandahar was in fact founded by Alexander the Great —  one Alexandria among several in his empire. The great translation movement centered in Baghdad from c. 800 to 1000 CE made more Greek Science, Medicine, and Philosophy available in Arabic than has been translated into any modern language since. A second translation movement, with strong centers in Spain and Sicily, amade Arabic scholarship available in Latin – Aristotle re-emerged in the West because Muslim scholars had not only translated his work but had gone far beyond the Greek starting points and provided foundations on which Christian thinkers could build. Western Europe built upon a foundation forged in Greek and Arabic. As Dimitri Gutas, an expert on Greek and Arabic points out, the dense cultural network of which the Europe is a part extends – and has extended for thousands of years — at least until India.

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Digital Humanities in Computer Science

November 3rd, 2010 by gregcrane

Digital Humanities in the Computer Science Department at Tufts University

Computer Science has played a critical role in many areas of inquiry, but nowhere are the potential implications greater than in the Humanities. We are transforming the ways in which we can relate to the past and understand the relationship of that past to the world in which we live. We need a new generation of researchers who can develop new methods from the computational sciences to advance the intellectual life of humanity.

The presence of the Perseus Project ( at Tufts since 1992 has allowed Tufts play a significant role in the emerging field of Digital Humanities. The Tufts Department of Computer Science ( now provides unique opportunities for emerging researchers with an interest in the Digital Humanities to develop those interests within the department of Computer Science, combining rigorous course work with opportunities to develop projects relevant to various areas within the humanities. Tufts can support a wide range of backgrounds and career goals.

Undergraduates at Tufts and elsewhere with an interest in Digital Humanities are encouraged to combine either a major or a minor in Computer Science with another area of the Humanities. Such a combination will provide a foundation for undergraduate research projects of tangible value.

Students who have a strong humanities background and wish to develop a rigorous foundation in Computer Science for subsequent Digital Humanities work are encouraged to consider the Post-Baccalaureate Minor Program in Computer Science ( The Post-Bac CS Minor will enable students either to pursue subsequent graduate work in Computer Science or lay the foundations for Digital Humanities research within a graduate program in the humanities.

More advanced students may consider the Master’s Program in Computer Science. This can either lead to a Phd program in Computer Science or an area within the Humanities but it can also prepare students for work developing the digital infrastructures within libraries, cultural institutions, and major media.

The Tufts Phd Program in Computer Science provides a framework in which students with a strong background in some area of the Humanities can develop research and teaching agendas that bridge the gap between Computer Science and areas within the Humanities. A Phd in Computer Science at Tufts can give you a unique position in revolutionizing the intellectual life of humanity. More information will become available with an update on For more information, students can contact

Digital Papyrology

October 26th, 2010 by Joshua Sosin

The following is a lightly edited version of a talk that I delivered at the 26th Congress of the International Association of Papyrologists, 19 August 2010, in Geneva (program), posted here upon nudging of G. Bodard.

Colleagues. It is a great honor and a privilege to be able to speak with you today. An honor and a privilege that, I hasten to add, I did not seek, but which a number of our colleagues insisted some months back the members of this research team must try to live up to. If I approach this distinguished body with some trepidation it is perhaps because my training as an epigraphist has conditioned me to a tone less attuned to collegiality than that which informs the papyrologists’ discipline. I should add also that am here not to present my own work, but the fruits of a team whose members are in Heidelberg, London, New York, North Carolina, Alabama, and Kentucky, and who have been working heroically for more than three years now.

I shall aim to speak for no more than 40 minutes so that we may at least start discussions, which I know the rest of the team and I will be more than happy to carry on via email, Skype, phone, and separate face to face meetings. I will add also that, since the matters arising from this talk are highly technical in nature, we shall be more than happy to field questions as a team (I and my colleagues Rodney Ast, James Cowey, Tom Elliott, and Paul Heilporn) and in any of the languages within our competence.

First some background. I don’t need to tell you very much about the history of the Duke Data Bank of Documentary Papyri. It was founded in 1983, as a collaboration between William Willis and John Oates of Duke University, and the Packard Humanities Institute. A decade and a half later, around the time, as it happens, that APIS was also starting, the DDbDP decided to migrate from the old CD platform and to the web. John in particular was committed to making the data available for free, to anyone who wanted access. The Perseus Project, from Tufts University, very kindly agreed to host the new online DDbDP, to develop a search interface, to convert the data from old Beta code to a markup language called SGML–all at no cost to us. The DDbDP added a few thousand texts after switching from the Packard CD ROM to Perseus. But the landscape changed dramatically from this point onward, and the DDbDP began to fall behind. The end of the CD ROM meant the end of regular revenues to support data entry and proofreading. And of course, ongoing development of the search interface was not without cost to Perseus, whose generous efforts on our behalf were, as I mention, unremunerated. Within a few years the DDbDP was behind in data entry and the search interface was not able to grow and mature in the ways that papyrologists wanted.

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