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Summary.

Adikia and Dike (Injustice and Justice).

Anangke (Necessity).

Arete (Excellence, Valor).

Basileia (Kingdom, Sovereignty, or Monarchy).

Boule (Council).

Demokratia (Democracy).

Demos (Populace) of Athens.

Demoi of demes.

Demoi of foreign cities.

Eirene (Peace).

→ Eukleia (Good Repute).

Eunomia (Good Order).

Eutaxia (Good Order).

Hellas (Greece).

Harmonia (Harmony).

Nemesis (Retribution).

Homonoia (Concord).

Oligarchia (Oligarchy).

Peitho (Persuasion).

Philia (Friendship).

Phyle/Phylai (Tribe/s).

Soteria (Salvation).

Themis.

(Agathe) Tyche (Good Fortune).

Further Reading.

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Athenian Political Art from the Fifth and Fourth Centuries BCE: Images of Political Personifications 

Amy C. Smith, edition of January 18 2003

page 12 of 26

· Eukleia (Good Repute) ·

Εὔκλεια

Read about the evidence
Sophocles (Soph. Aj.).
Plutarch (Plut. Arist.).
 
Plot on a Map
Boiotia.
Athens.

Discussion: In Greek literature eukleia referred to the personal qualities that brought a person a good reputation, as well as the reputation itself. In earlier Greek literature, eukleia, εὔκλεια , refers to the glory and fame that results from military victories. This is also the meaning of eukleia in mid-fifth century tragedies, e.g. SophoclesAjax (produced in 442 or 441), when Ajax bemoans his bad fortune (Soph. Aj. 462-64). In this and other contexts eukleia, one’s own reputation, is connected with good ancestry, and thus takes on an aristocratic connotation, as the good repute that comes from noble birth. It is perhaps in this regard that Eukleia became involved with marriage preparations, at least in Boiotia, Athens’ neighbor and long-term rival, where she was worshipped as an epithet of Artemis. Plutarch notes that Artemis Eukleia had an altar in each Boiotian agora, and that affianced boys and girls would make sacrifices to her in preparation for their weddings (Plut. Arist. 20). Eukleia’s meaning as the good reputation of private individuals becomes more prominent in the literature of the later fifth century, although it is never personified in Classical Athenian literature.

Read about the evidence
Pausanias (Paus.).
 
Plot on a Map
Plataia.
Marathon.
Boiotia (in text as “Boiotian”).
London.
Leuven.
Athens.

The origin of Eukleia’s cult at Athens is a matter of debate. Perhaps Eukleia was brought over from Boiotia to Athens at the time of the Persian Wars, when Athens was closely allied with Plataia: Pausanias records that a temple to Eukleia was erected on the edge of the Athenian Agora as a thank-offering for the victory over the Persians who landed at Marathon (490) (Paus. 1.15.4). Martin Nilsson has suggested that during this transference of the cult, Eukleia became detached from Artemis Eukleia (only Boiotian sources connect Artemis with Eukleia), and was henceforth worshipped independently at Athens (Nilsson 1955, 494). In her cult at Athens Eukleia may have retained her importance for fiances, since the sophist Antiphon mentions Eukleia in his discussion of marriage in On Concord. A joint cult of Eukleia and Eunomia is not evidenced at Athens in the late fifth century, but is rather inferred on the basis of their appearances together in vase painting, and later attestations of their worship together. Whereas Eunomia appears in several scenes apart from Eukleia, there are only two extant visual sources on which Eukleia may appear without Eunomia. In each of these cases the label identifying Eukleia is lost or incomplete. The first is the Heimarmene Painter’s name vase [10], where Eukleia may represent the good reputation that Helen is about to cast aside. Eukleia may also refer to Helen’s reputation in an illustration of Helen’s bridal bath, on a squat lekythos once in London, in the manner of the Meidias Painter [4]. Eukleia’s relevance in these two instances may also result from her cult significance in bridal preparations. On a plate now in Leuven, attributed to the Meidias Painter, and dated to 420-410 [1], Eukleia is probably the character who joins Eudaimonia (Prosperity/Happiness) in welcoming Asklepios (shown in the arms of Epidauros) to Athens. In this context Eukleia might serve as an indicator of the good pedigree of the Asklepios cult.

Examples (all are certain examples, unless otherwise noted):

Plot on a Map
London.

  1. Leuven KUL-A-1000: a standing female figure, labelled ΕΥ[ΚΛΕΙΑ] , resting on the shoulders of Eukleia, on a plate attributed to the Meidias Painter, ca. 420-410 (shown above).
  2. Berlin F 2705: a standing female figure, labelled ΕΥΚΛ[Ε]ΙΑ , on a squat lekythos (tallboy) attributed to the Painter of the Frankfort Acorn, ca. 410-400, with a representation of Eunomia.
  3. Budapest T 754: a standing female figure, labelled ΕΥΚΛ[Ε]ΙΑ , on an oinochoe in the manner of the Meidias Painter, ca. 410-400, with a representation of Eunomia.
  4. A seated female figure, labelled ΕΥΚΛΕΙΑ , holding a wreath, on a squat lekythos (tallboy), formerly in the Embiricos Collection, London, in the manner of the Meidias Painter, ca. 410-400, with a representation of Eunomia or Peitho.
  5. Naples SA 316: a standing female figure, labelled ΕΥΚΛΕΙΑ , holding fronds, on a lekanis lid, in the manner of the Meidias Painter, ca. 410-400, with representations of Eunomia, Harmonia, and Pannychis (All-night Revel).
  6. Mainz 118: a standing female figure, labelled Ε[Υ]ΚΛΕΙΑ , holding a large box, on a lekanis lid in the manner of the Meidias Painter, ca. 410-400, with representations of Eunomia, and Paidia (Play) shown here.
  7. Ullastret 1486: a standing female figure, labelled ΕΥΚΛΕΑ , holding a necklace out to Nikopolis, on a lekanis lid in the manner of the Meidias Painter, ca. 410-400, with a representation of Eunomia.
  8. New York 09.221.40: a standing female figure, labelled ΕΥΚΛΕΑ , holding a basket, on a pyxis, in the manner of the Meidias Painter, ca. 410-400, with representations of Eudaimonia (Happiness), Eunomia, Hygieia (Health), Paidia (Play), and Peitho.
  9. A seated female figure, labelled [Ε]ΥΚΛΕ[Ι]Α , on a kalpis hydria once in the Hope Collection, ca. 425-400, with representations of Peitho and probably Eunomia.
  10. [Possible example] Berlin 30036: a standing female figure, labelled [Ε]Υ[ΚΛ]Ε[ΙΑ] (which has also been restored as “Tyche”), on the name vase (a pointed amphoriskos) of the Heimarmene Painter, ca. 430-420, with representations of Nemesis, Peitho, Heimarmene, and perhaps Themis.
  11. [Possible example] Kansas City 31.80: a seated female figure holding a bird, on a white-ground squat lekythos attributed to the Eretria Painter, ca. 420-410, with representations of Peitho, Eunomia, and Paidia (Play).

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