Digital Research in the Study of Classical Antiquity

April 16th, 2010 by Simon Mahony

We are happy to announce the publication of the Digital Classicist volume:
Digital Research in the Study of Classical Antiquity

Digital Research in the Study of Classical AntiquityThis collection is based on presentations given at the Digital Classicist seminars in 2007, our various conference panels of that year and some that were specially commissioned.

Digital Research in the Study of Classical Antiquity, edited by Gabriel Bodard (King’s College London, UK) and Simon Mahony (University College London, UK), Ashgate 2010, ISBN 978-0-7546-7773-4 £ 55.00

For full details and the publishers blurb, see:
http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9780754677734

A copy of the publishers’ promotional flyer can be downloaded here, email it to your friends and libraries.

Note: there is a 20% discount until 31st August if you order online and quote the reference on the flyer.

12 Responses to “Digital Research in the Study of Classical Antiquity”

  1. Monte Johnson Says:

    Looks great? Are any of the papers available online?

  2. Gabriel Bodard Says:

    At the moment only the introduction is available to view online (link at the bottom of the Ashgate page given above).

    As and when any of the individual chapters are self-archived elsewhere, we’ll ask the authors to place a note here to that effect. (In the meantime, if you think it would be useful, please ask your library to order a copy!)

  3. Sebastian Heath Says:

    My contribution ‘Diversity and Reuse of Digital Resources for Ancient Mediterranean Material Culture’ is linked from http://sebastianheath.com/publications/ (the direct link is currently http://sebastianheath.com/files/HeathS2010-DigitalResearch.pdf ). With thanks to the editors and to Ashgate for facilitating this.

    -Sebastian

  4. Notis Toufexis Says:

    My contribution ‘One Era’s Nonsense, Another’s Norm: Diachronic study of Greek and the Computer’ can be found here. With thanks to the editors for their magnificent work and Ashgate for allowing self-archiving of contributions.

  5. Melissa Terras Says:

    My Chapter, “The Digital Classicist: Disciplinary Focus and Interdisciplinary Vision” is available at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/infostudies/melissa-terras/research/Chapter_10_Terras.pdf. With thanks to the editors, and to Ashgate.

    – Melissa

  6. Simon Mahony Says:

    The Introduction to this volume is available at:
    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/infostudies/simon-mahony/research/introduction.pdf
    With many thanks to Ashgate publishers for allowing self-archiving of the final pdfs.

  7. Notis Toufexis Says:

    You can read a review by Adam Rabinowitz (July 2011) here

  8. Simon Mahony Says:

    Review by Matteo Romanello at Literary & Linguistic Computing: Lit Linguist Computing (2011) doi: 10.1093/llc/fqr052

  9. Gabriel Bodard Says:

    A nice and very positive review of DRSCA has appeared in Journal of Documentation 67.4 (2011), pp. 742-4, by Clare Thornley. (Not to my knowledge open access, but available at Emerald Insight for those with institutional access.)

  10. Gabriel Bodard Says:

    Another brief but serviceable (and overall approving) review of DRSCA is in the Online Information Review 35,6 (2011), pp. 974-5, by Alireza Isfandyari-Moghaddam. I think I’m pleased by the final line: “It is of value for a much broader audience than it is likely to attract.” (Though I wish we could prove it wrong…)

  11. Simon Mahony Says:

    The Alireza Isfandyari-Moghaddam review is also available on Emerald which, as above, needs an institutional login. One interesting thing is that both reviews are listed under ‘Library and Information Studies’ which is an indication that we are in fact reaching a broader audience (although this of course may result from Ashgate’s marketing strategy) .

  12. Hugh Cayless Says:

    My chapter, “Ktema es aiei: Digital Permanence from an Ancient Perspective” is available at http://philomousos.com/papers/Cayless_DRSCA.pdf.

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